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FooBird

Why isn't Johnny QB getting any college offers?

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FooBird    147

The football off season is boring. Let's shake it up!

 

I've seen multiple posts in this forum along the lines of "...I can't believe [insert Name] from our school isn't being recruited to play [insert Position] in college."

 

Let's take a look at one hypothetical situation, Johnny Q. Bradford is the all-conference quarterback and career passing leader for Gnaw Bone High School. He's a captain of the Football, Basketball and Baseball teams. He led his team to their first sectional win in two decades this year. (Gnaw Bone unfortunately lost a tough Regional matchup against those cheaters from Cardinal Higi HS). Johnny seems like a smart kid and gets mostly A's and B's in school.

 

Every week since the end of the football season, at least a dozen people ask Johnny "Where are you going to play next year, John? I bet the recruiters are knocking down your door!"

 

Even though John is the best Quarterback to come of out Gnaw Bone since Smedley Fenderson (Class of 1928) the odds still aren't good for our boy John.

 

Here are some numbers for your perusal:

 

Number of athletes:

  • There are 1,088,158 athletes playing high school football on 16,047 High School teams.
  • This means that there are roughly 16,047 (or more) starting Quarterbacks in the country
  • About 10,000 of those starting Quarterbacks will graduate this year
  • At least 5,000 of those graduating, starting QBs have some level of interest in playing college football

Availability of positions:

 

  • The average college program has no more than 6 QBs on their roster
  • Only 1 or 2 new athletes (lets call it 1.5) are needed on per team per year to replace exiting athletes
  • Here are the number of football teams at each level of collegiate competition:
    • D1 FBS Teams - 126
    • D1 FCS Teams - 123
    • D2 Teams - 164
    • D3 Teams - 243
    • NAIA Teams - 79
    • NJCAA Teams - 67 (this is "Junior College")
    • Total College Teams: 802
  • Assuming that no more than 1.5 quarterbacks per team are needed, here is an estimate on the number of quarterback athletes needed at each level of competition:
    • D1 FBS - 189
    • D1 FCS - 185
    • D2 - 246
    • D3 - 365
    • NAIA - 119
    • NJCAA - 101
    • Total QB Athletes needed: 1,203
  • There are multiple theories and much wisdom about how to get Johnny recruited.  This post isn't about that. It's about understanding the basic odds that he faces in playing ball at the next level. For this example, let's pretend that every high school has a pretty good quarterback and that college coaches pick their recruits by randomly drawing names out of a hat. In that scenario, here are John's odds of playing QB in college. In each case, the % chance is cumulative and includes that level of football and all levels above it. This reflects the thought that if (for example) John is willing to consider playing at D2 schools, he has 189 D1 FBS + 185 D1 FCS + 246 D2 schools that might make him an offer. Here are the raw odds:
    • Chance of playing QB @ D1 FBS: 3.6%
    • " @ D1 FBS or FCS: 7%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS or D2: 12%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS, D2 or D3: 18%
    • " @ NCAA or NAIA: 21%
    • " @ NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA: 23%
    • For a variety of reasons, the odds are actually worse than this. But let's consider these "best case" or "optimistic" odds

Availability of scholarships:

Here's where the real bummer comes in.

  • In Division 1 FBS not everybody gets a scholarship. There are 105 roster spots and only 85 of those guys get scholarships. Philosophies differ per school, but the difference between the 85 and the 105 number is often unproven underclassmen who work and train (and pay for school and go to class) but have no guarantee of a scholarship down the road.
  • At lower levels there are even fewer scholarships and they are generally partial scholarships. Here are the number of scholarships per team at each level:
    • D1 FBS - 85 Scholarships per team (all full scholarships)
    • D1 FCS - 63 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D2 - 36 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D3 0 Scholarships per team
    • NAIA 12  Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • NJCAA 24 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
  • Expressed another way, here are the average scholarship amounts that a football athlete receives at each level:
    • D1 FBS $17,551
    • D1 FCS $10,882
    • D2 $4,938
    • D3 $-  
    • NAIA $6,577
    • NJCAA $1,920
  • Said another way... some of the D1 athletes will pay for their schooling with football. Most of the rest will pay to play their college to play football. Even at the D1 level, it is estimated the value of the scholarship is worth less than being paid minimum wage for the number of hours that a college athlete will put into their sport.
     
     
    In summary:
    • John's odds are not good to play D1.
    • The scholarships aren't very substantial below D1.
    • Stop asking him where he's going to play college ball.

     

    That is all. :)

     

     

    Thoughts?

     

 

  • Upvote 11

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titandad1971    116

It's monday, that made my head spin, alot of information in there. Great post +1.

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MasonAsher    2

What about when you get a guy like Kyle Castner? He is probably in the guys that should despite the throwing motion.

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WCGrad92    410

Does Castner also play Baseball?  That is what his throwing motion reminds me of most is a baseball pitcher. I would say if he does pitch, then Baseball might be the sport you see Mr. Castner playing at the next level or beyond.

 

I am by no means saying he will not be playing football at the college level, I am just stating, that if he does pitch, it might be baseball.

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FooBird    147

I must admit that I don't follow 6A closely and didn't know a lot about Kyle Castner until I read your post and googled him. That's a cool story and he seems like a good kid. I hope that things work out well for him and that he has the opportunity to play at the next level if that's what he want to do. Above all, he seems like a kid who is going to do well after football ends.

 

Now:

There are 324 High School football programs in the State of Indiana.

There are 16,000 High School football programs in the US.

 

Our state has 2% of the starting quarterbacks in the country.

This is a really simple way of looking at it, but "fair share" of the available college quarterback positions might be:

4 D1 FBS positions

4 D1 FCS positions

5 D2 positions

7 D3 positions

2 NAIA positions

2 NJCAA positions

24 positions total

 

Based on the article I read, it sounds like he wants to play D1 or maybe D2 (which would make sense given that those are the levels where the scholarships come with any significant number of $ attached).

 

So then the question becomes, can you identify somewhere between 8 and 13 better quarterbacks in his class?

Here I think you need to be careful to answer that question from perspective of "better" = "more likely to succeed at a college level"

 

He certainly seems to have done very well in league where he's going up against top high school athletes every week.

I didn't see him play this year, so I don't know how to answer that.

I also don't know much about the quarterback position... how does his current skill set translate to the college game.

Edited by FooBird

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Lysander    2,055

FooBird - great posts!

It's great to see someone put it into perspective.

Edited by Lysander

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MarshallCounty    412

How can you say the Smedley Fenderson is the best QB to ever play for the Boners.  How can you leave out the 3 Huckermyer boys from the late '40s and early '50s.  Hank, Huck, and Hack, were the true originators of "Basketball on Grass".  You better read up on your Boner Ball history before you make such a claim.

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BDGiant93    365

Kyle does not pitch currently (though he is an all-around athlete and I believe has played baseball before).  

 

He'll be a success wherever he goes whether he plays football or not.

Edited by BDGiant93

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The football off season is boring. Let's shake it up!

 

I've seen multiple posts in this forum along the lines of "...I can't believe [insert Name] from our school isn't being recruited to play [insert Position] in college."

 

Let's take a look at one hypothetical situation, Johnny Q. Bradford is the all-conference quarterback and career passing leader for Gnaw Bone High School. He's a captain of the Football, Basketball and Baseball teams. He led his team to their first sectional win in two decades this year. (Gnaw Bone unfortunately lost a tough Regional matchup against those cheaters from Cardinal Higi HS). Johnny seems like a smart kid and gets mostly A's and B's in school.

 

Every week since the end of the football season, at least a dozen people ask Johnny "Where are you going to play next year, John? I bet the recruiters are knocking down your door!"

 

Even though John is the best Quarterback to come of out Gnaw Bone since Smedley Fenderson (Class of 1928) the odds still aren't good for our boy John.

 

Here are some numbers for your perusal:

 

Number of athletes:

  • There are 1,088,158 athletes playing high school football on 16,047 High School teams.
  • This means that there are roughly 16,047 (or more) starting Quarterbacks in the country
  • About 10,000 of those starting Quarterbacks will graduate this year
  • At least 5,000 of those graduating, starting QBs have some level of interest in playing college football

Availability of positions:

 

  • The average college program has no more than 6 QBs on their roster
  • Only 1 or 2 new athletes (lets call it 1.5) are needed on per team per year to replace exiting athletes
  • Here are the number of football teams at each level of collegiate competition:
    • D1 FBS Teams - 126
    • D1 FCS Teams - 123
    • D2 Teams - 164
    • D3 Teams - 243
    • NAIA Teams - 79
    • NJCAA Teams - 67 (this is "Junior College")
    • Total College Teams: 802
  • Assuming that no more than 1.5 quarterbacks per team are needed, here is an estimate on the number of quarterback athletes needed at each level of competition:
    • D1 FBS - 189
    • D1 FCS - 185
    • D2 - 246
    • D3 - 365
    • NAIA - 119
    • NJCAA - 101
    • Total QB Athletes needed: 1,203
  • There are multiple theories and much wisdom about how to get Johnny recruited.  This post isn't about that. It's about understanding the basic odds that he faces in playing ball at the next level. For this example, let's pretend that every high school has a pretty good quarterback and that college coaches pick their recruits by randomly drawing names out of a hat. In that scenario, here are John's odds of playing QB in college. In each case, the % chance is cumulative and includes that level of football and all levels above it. This reflects the thought that if (for example) John is willing to consider playing at D2 schools, he has 189 D1 FBS + 185 D1 FCS + 246 D2 schools that might make him an offer. Here are the raw odds:
    • Chance of playing QB @ D1 FBS: 3.6%
    • " @ D1 FBS or FCS: 7%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS or D2: 12%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS, D2 or D3: 18%
    • " @ NCAA or NAIA: 21%
    • " @ NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA: 23%
    • For a variety of reasons, the odds are actually worse than this. But let's consider these "best case" or "optimistic" odds

Availability of scholarships:

Here's where the real bummer comes in.

  • In Division 1 FBS not everybody gets a scholarship. There are 105 roster spots and only 85 of those guys get scholarships. Philosophies differ per school, but the difference between the 85 and the 105 number is often unproven underclassmen who work and train (and pay for school and go to class) but have no guarantee of a scholarship down the road.
  • At lower levels there are even fewer scholarships and they are generally partial scholarships. Here are the number of scholarships per team at each level:
    • D1 FBS - 85 Scholarships per team (all full scholarships)
    • D1 FCS - 63 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D2 - 36 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D3 0 Scholarships per team
    • NAIA 12  Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • NJCAA 24 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
  • Expressed another way, here are the average scholarship amounts that a football athlete receives at each level:
    • D1 FBS $17,551
    • D1 FCS $10,882
    • D2 $4,938
    • D3 $-  
    • NAIA $6,577
    • NJCAA $1,920
  • Said another way... some of the D1 athletes will pay for their schooling with football. Most of the rest will pay to play their college to play football. Even at the D1 level, it is estimated the value of the scholarship is worth less than being paid minimum wage for the number of hours that a college athlete will put into their sport.
     
     
    In summary:
    • John's odds are not good to play D1.
    • The scholarships aren't very substantial below D1.
    • Stop asking him where he's going to play college ball.

     

    That is all. :)

     

     

    Thoughts?

     

 

 

 

 

 

This pretty much sums it all up

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Coach_G    649

That's all logical until it's your kid.  

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takkle4    188

It's a dog eat dog world out there!  College football is big business and coaches jobs depend on the talent level of their recruits.  It'd be hard to roll the dice on a kid that is marginal, especially if you don't know him or his family.  I think the most underrated part of being recruited is relationships... both player with college coach, but also high school coach with college coach. 

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Irishman    1,640

It's a dog eat dog world out there!  College football is big business and coaches jobs depend on the talent level of their recruits.  It'd be hard to roll the dice on a kid that is marginal, especially if you don't know him or his family.  I think the most underrated part of being recruited is relationships... both player with college coach, but also high school coach with college coach. 

Well said....add to it that if a marginal kid does show up in a program based on what a recruiting service, 7 on 7 coach said, or what a coach said to promote the kid and it does not pan out, guess what happens when these people actually do have a kid that is a legitimate D-1 prospect? That school that too the kid who did not pan out is not going to be interested. Other college coaches are going see that the kid did not pan out and are going to hesitate as well in looking at kids from those programs in the future.

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FooBird    147

It's a dog eat dog world out there!  College football is big business and coaches jobs depend on the talent level of their recruits.  It'd be hard to roll the dice on a kid that is marginal, especially if you don't know him or his family.  I think the most underrated part of being recruited is relationships... both player with college coach, but also high school coach with college coach. 

 

This next comment is a little off topic from my original post, but I'm also reminded by something surprising that I was told once by a legitimate college recruiter:

Most college coaches are liars. It is 100% to their benefit to promise more scholarships than they have available and to talk kids into preferred walk-on, (regular) walk-on or "grey shirt" offers. None of these are a scholarship offer and athletes should be very skeptical of anything that isn't any official offer in writing.

 

I've also heard:

 - In most programs, less than 1 out of every 100 kids that try to walk on will get a roster spot.

 - Of those who do successfully walk on, less than 20% will become scholarship players.

 

I don't mean to sound pessimistic here. I think we are inspired by athletes because they prepare and compete to overcome odds. You just hope that parents and kids are a little realistic about the level of challenge.

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BuckLateral    61

Great stuff, FooBird.  How do those odds bear out for say, offensive linemen?  

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FooBird    147

Great stuff, FooBird.  How do those odds bear out for say, offensive linemen?  

I think the odds are probably worse at most positions... most positions don't have as many backup players for every starter.

 

There is some good information here:

http://www.scholarshipstats.com/football.html

 

That site has the total number of high school football athletes listed as being a little higher.... 1.1 million.

Their (extensive) data shows that there are about 89,000 total college football athletes.

American football (unlike soccer or even basketball) is a sport where we don't have much foreign competition for college team spots, so the vast majority of the 89,000 athletes will come from the pool of 1.1 million american high school students.

 

About 8% of current high school football players will play in college (at any level junior college through D1).

1% will play D1 FBS

Another 1% will play D1 FCS.

About 1.5% will play D2 and about 2% will play D3.

The remainder will come from NAIA, NJCAA and other divisions.

 

Now... this doesn't necessarily mean that a kid who wants to play in college has an 8% chance.

Many high school kids who play won't be eligible or interested.

 

If you have athletic talent, good grades, good attitude and work ethic you have a decent (20% ?) chance to play at some level.

In most cases, that will mean paying tuition in order to continue playing football (oh yeah... and getting an education)

 

If you have your heart set on D1 (or a specific D1 school) your odds aren't very good.

Even if you are a great high school player.

 

For high school kids, I think it's also good to look at that web site above and compare the tuition and room/board costs to the "average athletic aid" column. Then for some real fun, compare the "average athletic aid" to a year of working part time at minimum wage.

Edited by FooBird

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Meat Wagon    12

This is an interesting breakdown of the numbers, but it doesn't address the academic portion of playing college football. Some kids simply aren't cut out for higher education. I would say a significant percent of schools look at academic achievements when considering athletes(I'll let someone else determine what "significant" is)...thus limiting opportunities as well.

The football off season is boring. Let's shake it up!

 

I've seen multiple posts in this forum along the lines of "...I can't believe [insert Name] from our school isn't being recruited to play [insert Position] in college."

 

Let's take a look at one hypothetical situation, Johnny Q. Bradford is the all-conference quarterback and career passing leader for Gnaw Bone High School. He's a captain of the Football, Basketball and Baseball teams. He led his team to their first sectional win in two decades this year. (Gnaw Bone unfortunately lost a tough Regional matchup against those cheaters from Cardinal Higi HS). Johnny seems like a smart kid and gets mostly A's and B's in school.

 

Every week since the end of the football season, at least a dozen people ask Johnny "Where are you going to play next year, John? I bet the recruiters are knocking down your door!"

 

Even though John is the best Quarterback to come of out Gnaw Bone since Smedley Fenderson (Class of 1928) the odds still aren't good for our boy John.

 

Here are some numbers for your perusal:

 

Number of athletes:

  • There are 1,088,158 athletes playing high school football on 16,047 High School teams.
  • This means that there are roughly 16,047 (or more) starting Quarterbacks in the country
  • About 10,000 of those starting Quarterbacks will graduate this year
  • At least 5,000 of those graduating, starting QBs have some level of interest in playing college football
Availability of positions:

 

  • The average college program has no more than 6 QBs on their roster
  • Only 1 or 2 new athletes (lets call it 1.5) are needed on per team per year to replace exiting athletes
  • Here are the number of football teams at each level of collegiate competition:
    • D1 FBS Teams - 126

    • D1 FCS Teams - 123

    • D2 Teams - 164

    • D3 Teams - 243

    • NAIA Teams - 79

    • NJCAA Teams - 67 (this is "Junior College")

    • Total College Teams: 802

  • Assuming that no more than 1.5 quarterbacks per team are needed, here is an estimate on the number of quarterback athletes needed at each level of competition:

    • D1 FBS - 189

    • D1 FCS - 185

    • D2 - 246

    • D3 - 365

    • NAIA - 119

    • NJCAA - 101

    • Total QB Athletes needed: 1,203

  • There are multiple theories and much wisdom about how to get Johnny recruited.  This post isn't about that. It's about understanding the basic odds that he faces in playing ball at the next level. For this example, let's pretend that every high school has a pretty good quarterback and that college coaches pick their recruits by randomly drawing names out of a hat. In that scenario, here are John's odds of playing QB in college. In each case, the % chance is cumulative and includes that level of football and all levels above it. This reflects the thought that if (for example) John is willing to consider playing at D2 schools, he has 189 D1 FBS + 185 D1 FCS + 246 D2 schools that might make him an offer. Here are the raw odds:
    • Chance of playing QB @ D1 FBS: 3.6%
    • " @ D1 FBS or FCS: 7%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS or D2: 12%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS, D2 or D3: 18%
    • " @ NCAA or NAIA: 21%
    • " @ NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA: 23%
    • For a variety of reasons, the odds are actually worse than this. But let's consider these "best case" or "optimistic" odds
Availability of scholarships:

Here's where the real bummer comes in.

  • In Division 1 FBS not everybody gets a scholarship. There are 105 roster spots and only 85 of those guys get scholarships. Philosophies differ per school, but the difference between the 85 and the 105 number is often unproven underclassmen who work and train (and pay for school and go to class) but have no guarantee of a scholarship down the road.
  • At lower levels there are even fewer scholarships and they are generally partial scholarships. Here are the number of scholarships per team at each level:
    • D1 FBS - 85 Scholarships per team (all full scholarships)

    • D1 FCS - 63 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)

    • D2 - 36 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)

    • D3 0 Scholarships per team

    • NAIA 12  Scholarships per team (mostly partial)

    • NJCAA 24 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)

  • Expressed another way, here are the average scholarship amounts that a football athlete receives at each level:

    • D1 FBS $17,551

    • D1 FCS $10,882

    • D2 $4,938

    • D3 $-  

    • NAIA $6,577

    • NJCAA $1,920

  • Said another way... some of the D1 athletes will pay for their schooling with football. Most of the rest will pay to play their college to play football. Even at the D1 level, it is estimated the value of the scholarship is worth less than being paid minimum wage for the number of hours that a college athlete will put into their sport.

     

     

    In summary:

    • John's odds are not good to play D1.
    • The scholarships aren't very substantial below D1.
    • Stop asking him where he's going to play college ball.
     

    That is all. :)

     

     

    Thoughts?

     

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I've also heard:

 - In most programs, less than 1 out of every 100 kids that try to walk on will get a roster spot.

 - Of those who do successfully walk on, less than 20% will become scholarship players.

You keep spitting your logic, I'll just keep watching Rudy, the story of a hobbit from Juliet, IL to make on to the field for Notre Dame.

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FooBird    147

You keep spitting your logic, I'll just keep watching Rudy, the story of a hobbit from Juliet, IL to make on to the field for Notre Dame.

 

Oh... I forgot one important stat:

 

- Of those who walk on at major Catholic universities and are later portrayed as the antagonist in a TriStar Pictures movie, 100% will be charged with securities fraud by the SEC.

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FooBird    147

This is an interesting breakdown of the numbers, but it doesn't address the academic portion of playing college football. Some kids simply aren't cut out for higher education. I would say a significant percent of schools look at academic achievements when considering athletes(I'll let someone else determine what "significant" is)...thus limiting opportunities as well.

 

 

Agreed:

"Many high school kids who play won't be eligible or interested" (in college football)

 

I don't know where you would get stats for that, but my own wild guess is that 50% of high school kids fall into that category.

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Irishman    1,640

You keep spitting your logic, I'll just keep watching Rudy, the story of a hobbit from Juliet, IL to make on to the field for Notre Dame.

While Rudy was a great story, he actually fits perfectly into the stats foo provided. But with the smaller population at ND compared to other D-1 schools, and the lower scholarship numbers, it was more likely for a walk on to make a squad.

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Meat Wagon    12

Agreed:

"Many high school kids who play won't be eligible or interested" (in college football)

I clearly read right over that line.

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Meat Wagon    12

As someone who played at the D3 level, if a kid really wants to play, I believe he can find an opportunity. Whether or not he makes a team is a different story, but I believe that the opportunity is available.

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LilUrb    82

 

The football off season is boring. Let's shake it up!

 

I've seen multiple posts in this forum along the lines of "...I can't believe [insert Name] from our school isn't being recruited to play [insert Position] in college."

 

Let's take a look at one hypothetical situation, Johnny Q. Bradford is the all-conference quarterback and career passing leader for Gnaw Bone High School. He's a captain of the Football, Basketball and Baseball teams. He led his team to their first sectional win in two decades this year. (Gnaw Bone unfortunately lost a tough Regional matchup against those cheaters from Cardinal Higi HS). Johnny seems like a smart kid and gets mostly A's and B's in school.

 

Every week since the end of the football season, at least a dozen people ask Johnny "Where are you going to play next year, John? I bet the recruiters are knocking down your door!"

 

Even though John is the best Quarterback to come of out Gnaw Bone since Smedley Fenderson (Class of 1928) the odds still aren't good for our boy John.

 

Here are some numbers for your perusal:

 

Number of athletes:

  • There are 1,088,158 athletes playing high school football on 16,047 High School teams.
  • This means that there are roughly 16,047 (or more) starting Quarterbacks in the country
  • About 10,000 of those starting Quarterbacks will graduate this year
  • At least 5,000 of those graduating, starting QBs have some level of interest in playing college football

Availability of positions:

 

  • The average college program has no more than 6 QBs on their roster
  • Only 1 or 2 new athletes (lets call it 1.5) are needed on per team per year to replace exiting athletes
  • Here are the number of football teams at each level of collegiate competition:
    • D1 FBS Teams - 126
    • D1 FCS Teams - 123
    • D2 Teams - 164
    • D3 Teams - 243
    • NAIA Teams - 79
    • NJCAA Teams - 67 (this is "Junior College")
    • Total College Teams: 802
  • Assuming that no more than 1.5 quarterbacks per team are needed, here is an estimate on the number of quarterback athletes needed at each level of competition:
    • D1 FBS - 189
    • D1 FCS - 185
    • D2 - 246
    • D3 - 365
    • NAIA - 119
    • NJCAA - 101
    • Total QB Athletes needed: 1,203
  • There are multiple theories and much wisdom about how to get Johnny recruited.  This post isn't about that. It's about understanding the basic odds that he faces in playing ball at the next level. For this example, let's pretend that every high school has a pretty good quarterback and that college coaches pick their recruits by randomly drawing names out of a hat. In that scenario, here are John's odds of playing QB in college. In each case, the % chance is cumulative and includes that level of football and all levels above it. This reflects the thought that if (for example) John is willing to consider playing at D2 schools, he has 189 D1 FBS + 185 D1 FCS + 246 D2 schools that might make him an offer. Here are the raw odds:
    • Chance of playing QB @ D1 FBS: 3.6%
    • " @ D1 FBS or FCS: 7%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS or D2: 12%
    • " @ D1 FBS/FCS, D2 or D3: 18%
    • " @ NCAA or NAIA: 21%
    • " @ NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA: 23%
    • For a variety of reasons, the odds are actually worse than this. But let's consider these "best case" or "optimistic" odds

Availability of scholarships:

Here's where the real bummer comes in.

  • In Division 1 FBS not everybody gets a scholarship. There are 105 roster spots and only 85 of those guys get scholarships. Philosophies differ per school, but the difference between the 85 and the 105 number is often unproven underclassmen who work and train (and pay for school and go to class) but have no guarantee of a scholarship down the road.
  • At lower levels there are even fewer scholarships and they are generally partial scholarships. Here are the number of scholarships per team at each level:
    • D1 FBS - 85 Scholarships per team (all full scholarships)
    • D1 FCS - 63 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D2 - 36 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • D3 0 Scholarships per team
    • NAIA 12  Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
    • NJCAA 24 Scholarships per team (mostly partial)
  • Expressed another way, here are the average scholarship amounts that a football athlete receives at each level:
    • D1 FBS $17,551
    • D1 FCS $10,882
    • D2 $4,938
    • D3 $-  
    • NAIA $6,577
    • NJCAA $1,920
  • Said another way... some of the D1 athletes will pay for their schooling with football. Most of the rest will pay to play their college to play football. Even at the D1 level, it is estimated the value of the scholarship is worth less than being paid minimum wage for the number of hours that a college athlete will put into their sport.
     
     
    In summary:
    • John's odds are not good to play D1.
    • The scholarships aren't very substantial below D1.
    • Stop asking him where he's going to play college ball.

     

    That is all. :)

     

     

    Thoughts?

     

 

Is there a parent forum we can post this in.....

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Coach_G    649

I gave all my incoming parents ( for the last several years) a multiple page packet every year at our spring meeting breaking down the reality (much like above) and explaining what should be occurring in and out of the season if getting a scholarship was a goal.  It's an important part of the HC's job to educate and be honest about the process.  Explain the role of the coach, the player, and the parent in the process long before a single down of varsity football is played.   Saves tons of time and energy on the back end.  

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