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      Head Coach Openings 2017   10/17/2016

      Frankton: Randy England  Bobby Ryan Promoted  Franklin Community:  Adam Reese  Chris Coll hired from Tri-West Martinsville: Brad Rose  Carter Whitson Hired  Lake Central: Brett St. Germain Tony Bartolomeo Promoted South Bend Clay: Craig Redman  Will Porter Hired from South Vermilion  Boone Grove:  Tony Tinkel   Dan Kukulski Promoted  Mooresville:  Chad Dockery Mike Gillin hired from Indian Creek Wood Memorial:  Caleb Cherry/Archer  Bret Kramer Hired Tippecanoe Valley:  Shriver/Norris   Stephen Moriarty  Hired Corydon Central:  Andrew Smith    Aaron Humphrey Hired Calumet New Tech:  Rik Richards  Rick Good Hired  Winamac:  Tim Roth Craig Barr Hired   Tri-West: Chris Coll Tyler Bruce Promoted North Central (Indy): Kevin Kreinhagen Kevin O'Shea hired from Lafayette Central Catholic Indy Chatard:  Vince Lorenzano Rob Doyle Promoted Paoli: Brian Balsmeyer Jeremy Lowery Promoted Mt. Vernon (Fortville): Doug Armstrong  Neil Kazmierczak  Hired from Lebanon  Bluffton: Randy Hudgins Brett Kunkel Hired Indian Creek: Mike Gillin Brett Cooper Hired Vincennes Lincoln:  Jon Heiden  Levi Salters Promoted  Frankfort:  Joel Sienicki Eric Davis Hired from Tri-County South Vermillion:  Will Porter  Greg Barrett hired from North Putnam Riverton Parke:  Jake Weber Brad Sanders Promoted Elkhart Central:  Levon Johnson Josh Shattuck hired from Seymour Mt. Vernon (Posey) Paul Meirer Cory Brunson hired from Evansville Harrison Richmond:  Matt Holeva  Abe Tawfeek hired from Indy Northwest Lebanon:    Neil Kazmierczak Jeff Smock Hired North White:  Jim Davis Kirk Quasebarth Promoted  North Posey:   Paul Rynkiewich  Waylon Schenk hired from Princeton  Pike Central:  Dustin Powell   Erik Mattingly Hired  John Glenn:  Damon Groves Austin Faust Promoted North Putnam:  Greg Barrett Sam Carnes Hired  Lafayette Central Catholic: Kevin O'Shea Don Coller Promoted  Evansville Harrison: Cory Brunson Lane Oxley Hired Indianapolis Roncalli:  Bruce Scifres Scott Marsh Promoted  Anderson Prep Academy: Jeffrey Dorman Randy Albano Hired Princeton:   Waylon Schenk   Jared Maners Hired Ft. Wayne North:  Mike Cochran Michael Brevard Hired Turkey Run:  Steve Stewart Bruce Scaggs Hired Indianapolis Northwest:   Abe Tawfeek Jonas Williams Promoted Tri-County:  Eric Davis  Sam Zachary Hired Carroll Community:  Mark Brown Kevin Sayler Promoted  Oldenburg Academy:  Wes Gillman  Union County:  Rusty Hensley Joel Hofmann promoted Edgewood: Jerry Bland Brian Rosenburg Hired Seymour:  Josh Shattuck  Michael Kelly Hired Wawasee:  Josh Ekovich Michael Eshbach hired from Eastside Muncie Central:  Adam Morris Scott Pethtel Hired Benton Central:  Ed Roberson  Mike Hammons  Promoted  Western:  Ron Jankovich Alex Stewart Hired New Castle:  Will Ragle  Kyle York Hired Sullivan:  Trent Olson Blaine Powell promoted Northwestern:  Alex Stewart Steve Disler hired  Clinton Central:  Isaac Sturgis Justin Gardiner Hired North Miami:  Mark Lefebvre  Joe Grant Hired from Rochester Spring Valley Justin Scheller Mark Hammond Hired  Edinburgh:  Derrick Ball  Jason Burton Hired Eastside: Michael Eshbach Steve Cooley promoted Rochester: Joe Grant Brian Hooker Hired Cloverdale: Tony Meyer Tom Winder Promoted Hammond Clark: Eric Schreiber  Hammond Noll:  Colin McCullough  Wayne Racine hired Lake Station:  Adam Hudak   South Central:  Eric Stephens Buzz Schoff Hired  Caston:  Brady Jones  Tony Slocum Promoted  
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Nickelbackjack

Tippy valley coach suspended?

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4 hours ago, Coach Ellenwood said:

In some cases, I am sure YES.  At the school I teach at, they hired the LEAST qualified (majority of coaching experience was middle school level) of all the candidates.  One of the candidates was not good enough for this school, but has resurrected a struggling DAC school in Porter County.  But the hfb coach is from this area, where the rest are not.  I do live in the district, but am not from around here.

Not only is he from the area, he married into a VERY prominent local family that holds special value in the community you are referring to. Unfortunately connections like these often get in the way of fair, due process for hiring a coach...and also get in the way of, well, success. 

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2 hours ago, Patch33 said:

Showing excitement by fist pumping and cheering on your players, is not a "Bro Culture". You can be a leader of Young men and Grown men by creating a culture in which kids and people want to be in. It does not mean that you treat them as peers. It means they understand  that you care about them and can rejoice in a moment with them, you aren't afraid to celebrate their successes.  I have found in my years of coaching that I am a much better coach when they know I care, rather then when we have dictitoral type of relationship.  None of this means there is not discipline and order. You all would hate watching Westfield play.  We celebrate with our kids all the time. We even celebrate a turnover and try to be enthusiastic as possible at all times. We have built a team dedicated to family, service and hard work. Our numbers continue to grow from the youth leagues up. Our mission statement is to "make playing football at Westfield one of the most incredible experiences of your life." We take kids to College game, to a haunted house, we host a Special Olympics football camp, we have won the Indiana Blood Drive 3 of the last year, we have raised almost $50.000 for cancer.  Oh and by the way, we won a State Championship and were runner up  once. We won 4 sectionals in a row, won two regionals, won 2 semi-states.  We fist bumped and chest bumped and encouraged all the way in all of these endeavors!  We are in the business of building young men who will be future leaders and what a great forum football is to do that. Building leaders doesn't have to be mean and uncaring. Read the book, " Lead for Gods sake". Read, " The Energy bus".  People will follow those who they know care for them and root for them. The do as I say because I am coach days are over. I for one say " Thank GOD"!

All well and good, but does the head coach wear at least a shirt and tie on the sideline during games? 

 

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1 hour ago, DrivenT said:

Texas high school football gets a lot of airtime on cable tv.  You Tube another hot spot.  

Yes they get a lot of exposure, but so do other non-Texas HS teams.  Maybe not as many from one single state as the TX schools, I'll grant you that.

Might not have been your intention, but I thought it read like like TX coaches were being singled out as the worst.

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2 hours ago, Coach Ellenwood said:

even during his days at KV when he wore overalls?

 

harsh

not altogether unrealistic

I do remember as an assistant for one year during my college days that we always wore the red polo shirts for the games under Prescott. He was a good man and a good coach, glad he has found a home down in Peru. I must say it was also beneficial to have a coach as the assistant principal being the obstinate youngster I was. Is he also in a dual principal/coach role at Peru?

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15 minutes ago, Bonecrusher said:

Yes they get a lot of exposure, but so do other non-Texas HS teams.  Maybe not as many from one single state as the TX schools, I'll grant you that.

Might not have been your intention, but I thought it read like like TX coaches were being singled out as the worst.

They do everything bigger in Texas, including flying chest bumps.  

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I think most of this stuff ultimately comes down to wins and losses. Let’s be honest several hall of fame coaches were not sweet hearts but you can afford to be a jerk as long as you win championships. And on the flip side, you can be a super good guy and get fired for not performing your job. I do know that if I don’t perform my job at an acceptable level that I would be showed the door. I feel the same should be expected in all jobs. We Have a lot of mediocrocy allowed in our schools. Look at Bear Bryant , every player who ever quit his teams hated him for life but those who stuck it out loved him for life. Same guy, treated them all the same but obviously he knew what it took to build a winner

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36 minutes ago, silvertone1696 said:

harsh

not altogether unrealistic

I do remember as an assistant for one year during my college days that we always wore the red polo shirts for the games under Prescott. He was a good man and a good coach, glad he has found a home down in Peru. I must say it was also beneficial to have a coach as the assistant principal being the obstinate youngster I was. Is he also in a dual principal/coach role at Peru?

I wasn't trying to be harsh. That was a serious question. The lore of that story goes round and round in this area. Was just wondering. 

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Newsrooms,

 

The following statement is the final outcome to the news release I sent last Wednesday regarding coach Stephen Moriarty.

 

“Jeff Shriver will assume all head coaching responsibilities at Tippecanoe Valley High School for the remainder of the 2017 football season.  Stephen Moriarty will return this week as a member of the coaching staff.”

 

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On ‎10‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 9:30 AM, NRRaider2001 said:

this isn't just a coach/student relation problem, it's a parent/kid problem too....too many parents/coaches would rather be friends with their kids than the one that holds them accountable.  But my statement stands, if everyone that thought this way were to sign up and coach, it would work wonders for changing this "bro" culture.

^^^^ THIS ^^^^  ALL OF IT

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1 hour ago, Patch33 said:

Showing excitement by fist pumping and cheering on your players, is not a "Bro Culture". You can be a leader of Young men and Grown men by creating a culture in which kids and people want to be in. It does not mean that you treat them as peers. It means they understand  that you care about them and can rejoice in a moment with them, you aren't afraid to celebrate their successes.  I have found in my years of coaching that I am a much better coach when they know I care, rather then when we have dictitoral type of relationship.  None of this means there is not discipline and order. You all would hate watching Westfield play.  We celebrate with our kids all the time. We even celebrate a turnover and try to be enthusiastic as possible at all times. We have built a team dedicated to family, service and hard work. Our numbers continue to grow from the youth leagues up. Our mission statement is to "make playing football at Westfield one of the most incredible experiences of your life." We take kids to College game, to a haunted house, we host a Special Olympics football camp, we have won the Indiana Blood Drive 3 of the last year, we have raised almost $50.000 for cancer.  Oh and by the way, we won a State Championship and were runner up  once. We won 4 sectionals in a row, won two regionals, won 2 semi-states.  We fist bumped and chest bumped and encouraged all the way in all of these endeavors!  We are in the business of building young men who will be future leaders and what a great forum football is to do that. Building leaders doesn't have to be mean and uncaring. Read the book, " Lead for Gods sake". Read, " The Energy bus".  People will follow those who they know care for them and root for them. The do as I say because I am coach days are over. I for one say " Thank GOD"!

Patch, 

First, I've read "Lead for Gods Sake." It's a great book and learning lesson for young coaches. I loved it. But you're misreading what us 'old school' coaches are saying. Raising money for cancer, blood drives, college games, etc are all great things to do with your kids. No one is going to deny that. Seriously, those things are awesome! But that tells me nothing about blurring the line between coach and 'bro.'

I'm not a fist bump or flying chest bump kind of guy. I think it's rather amateur. But a head coach giving those fist and chest bumps doesn't really show that you 'care' about a kid. To me, that's more of a 'bro' thing and a kid isn't going to gain more respect from you because of those things. I had coaches who screamed and yelled and were simply the "Do as a I say and not as I do" who I hated. I also had coaches who screamed and yelled but would talk to me afterward and do other little things that meant a lot to me as a player that really showed he cared about me. When players look back today, I don't believe they're going to say, "Man, that coached loved me because he gave me a flying hip bump after I scored all my TD's." It's those other little things that will make a difference to the kid.  

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A fist bump is not in any way different than a pat on the back or helmet. No one would argue that a coach patting a player on the back is "bro culture". 

If you're going to coach them hard during the week at practice (old school I guess??), you dang sure better find a way to celebrate their success and effort during the game on a Friday night. It's an investment and withdrawal thing. Hand shake, fist bump, pat on the back, bear hug, it's all the same. It's not about "bro" anything. 

 

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55 minutes ago, Canoe Fest Charlie said:

Patch, 

First, I've read "Lead for Gods Sake." It's a great book and learning lesson for young coaches. I loved it. But you're misreading what us 'old school' coaches are saying. Raising money for cancer, blood drives, college games, etc are all great things to do with your kids. No one is going to deny that. Seriously, those things are awesome! But that tells me nothing about blurring the line between coach and 'bro.'

I'm not a fist bump or flying chest bump kind of guy. I think it's rather amateur. But a head coach giving those fist and chest bumps doesn't really show that you 'care' about a kid. To me, that's more of a 'bro' thing and a kid isn't going to gain more respect from you because of those things. I had coaches who screamed and yelled and were simply the "Do as a I say and not as I do" who I hated. I also had coaches who screamed and yelled but would talk to me afterward and do other little things that meant a lot to me as a player that really showed he cared about me. When players look back today, I don't believe they're going to say, "Man, that coached loved me because he gave me a flying hip bump after I scored all my TD's." It's those other little things that will make a difference to the kid.  

  I can assure you that our staff is included in many aspects of our athletes lives outside of football. I will not go into the  things each of us does to ensure that our players know we love and care about them, but I assure you they know. Each of us is very involved with our kids off the field as well as on.  Again, when we say we are family here, it is not just a saying. I'm also not saying there is not a place for yelling and getting after it, but for anyone to say that because you get excited for your players and show emotion creates a "Bro" culture is just silly. Coaching for me is very personal, and I try to coach other peoples children as I want my sons coached. I want them pushed outside of their comfort zones constantly, physically and mentally so they can discover what their best is.     (This is the essence of great coaching) I want them held accountable when their effort or focus is less then their potential.   How often do we really get pushed in our daily endeavors to find out what we are truly capable of?  However, I think we can challenge and prod a lot harder if kids know you care and love them.  If you are going to get after them hard when they make mistakes, it only makes sense to celebrate when they do something extraordinary.       

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31 minutes ago, Patch33 said:

  I can assure you that our staff is included in many aspects of our athletes lives outside of football. I will not go into the  things each of us does to ensure that our players know we love and care about them, but I assure you they know. Each of us is very involved with our kids off the field as well as on.  Again, when we say we are family here, it is not just a saying. I'm also not saying there is not a place for yelling and getting after it, but for anyone to say that because you get excited for your players and show emotion creates a "Bro" culture is just silly. Coaching for me is very personal, and I try to coach other peoples children as I want my sons coached. I want them pushed outside of their comfort zones constantly, physically and mentally so they can discover what their best is.     (This is the essence of great coaching) I want them held accountable when their effort or focus is less then their potential.   How often do we really get pushed in our daily endeavors to find out what we are truly capable of?  However, I think we can challenge and prod a lot harder if kids know you care and love them.  If you are going to get after them hard when they make mistakes, it only makes sense to celebrate when they do something extraordinary.       

RACK IT   

TIMES 2 

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1 hour ago, Patch33 said:

  I can assure you that our staff is included in many aspects of our athletes lives outside of football. I will not go into the  things each of us does to ensure that our players know we love and care about them, but I assure you they know. Each of us is very involved with our kids off the field as well as on.  Again, when we say we are family here, it is not just a saying. I'm also not saying there is not a place for yelling and getting after it, but for anyone to say that because you get excited for your players and show emotion creates a "Bro" culture is just silly. Coaching for me is very personal, and I try to coach other peoples children as I want my sons coached. I want them pushed outside of their comfort zones constantly, physically and mentally so they can discover what their best is.     (This is the essence of great coaching) I want them held accountable when their effort or focus is less then their potential.   How often do we really get pushed in our daily endeavors to find out what we are truly capable of?  However, I think we can challenge and prod a lot harder if kids know you care and love them.  If you are going to get after them hard when they make mistakes, it only makes sense to celebrate when they do something extraordinary.       

I'm sure everyone here is very impressed with the extra curricular activities you and your ballclub perform for the community at large.

That's not the issue.

Coaches need to draw the line between "coach" and "bro" with their players.

That line has been breached.   It's unprofessional behavior.  All those with a modicum of maturity can see that.

 

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3 hours ago, Canoe Fest Charlie said:

Patch, 

First, I've read "Lead for Gods Sake." It's a great book and learning lesson for young coaches. I loved it. But you're misreading what us 'old school' coaches are saying. Raising money for cancer, blood drives, college games, etc are all great things to do with your kids. No one is going to deny that. Seriously, those things are awesome! But that tells me nothing about blurring the line between coach and 'bro.'

I'm not a fist bump or flying chest bump kind of guy. I think it's rather amateur. But a head coach giving those fist and chest bumps doesn't really show that you 'care' about a kid. To me, that's more of a 'bro' thing and a kid isn't going to gain more respect from you because of those things. I had coaches who screamed and yelled and were simply the "Do as a I say and not as I do" who I hated. I also had coaches who screamed and yelled but would talk to me afterward and do other little things that meant a lot to me as a player that really showed he cared about me. When players look back today, I don't believe they're going to say, "Man, that coached loved me because he gave me a flying hip bump after I scored all my TD's." It's those other little things that will make a difference to the kid.  

In some places it matters. In some places, they only care about themselves, the player, in the ultimate team game. 

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5 hours ago, DrivenT said:

I'm sure everyone here is very impressed with the extra curricular activities you and your ballclub perform for the community at large.

That's not the issue.

Coaches need to draw the line between "coach" and "bro" with their players.

That line has been breached.   It's unprofessional behavior.  All those with a modicum of maturity can see that.

 

Starting to approach an Andy Kaufman vs Jerry Lawler relationship here.

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Honest to God...unless some of these posts are some "insider" code about why this coach was suspended (which the rest of you know and I have no idea about) I just don't get anything in the last 2 or 3 pages. 

Do we need a "Coach v. Bro" thread?  Did the dude get demoted because he was a "bro" v. a "coach"?  I'm hoping that is the case.

Or should we just move along and argue the "coach"/"bro" thing in a new thread? I'm happy to open that new thread.

Honestly, when a coach or teacher "thing" keeps hanging around I'm thinking the worst. 

What am I missing?  Perhaps time to move on? Start that "Coach v Bro'" thread?

 

Edited by Lysander

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16 hours ago, DrivenT said:

I'm sure everyone here is very impressed with the extra curricular activities you and your ballclub perform for the community at large.

That's not the issue.

Coaches need to draw the line between "coach" and "bro" with their players.

That line has been breached.   It's unprofessional behavior.  All those with a modicum of maturity can see that.

 

You just don't get it. To lump it all in one ball is irresponsible. You really have not read anything I have written, if that is all you have taken from the posts. I am done.  I am not sure what qualifies you to decide what is professional or not in this profession.  I am sure however you spent at least a few days with all these men you are judging and actually saw how they interacted with their student athlete at practice and in school. Young coaches, learn your craft and don't stop learning, coach with energy and excitement, love your players, hold them accountable, push them and do your thing.  Be true to yourselves and only worry about results and relationships. Sometimes you just have to remove the Energy Vampire from the BUS! 

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14 minutes ago, Patch33 said:

I am not sure what qualifies you to decide what is professional or not in this profession.  

Do you wear a shirt and tie on the sideline during a game?  Why or why not?

 

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22 minutes ago, Patch33 said:

You just don't get it. To lump it all in one ball is irresponsible. You really have not read anything I have written, if that is all you have taken from the posts. I am done.  I am not sure what qualifies you to decide what is professional or not in this profession.  I am sure however you spent at least a few days with all these men you are judging and actually saw how they interacted with their student athlete at practice and in school. Young coaches, learn your craft and don't stop learning, coach with energy and excitement, love your players, hold them accountable, push them and do your thing.  Be true to yourselves and only worry about results and relationships. Sometimes you just have to remove the Energy Vampire from the BUS! 

Let me try to sum it up in this way.

I dont watch the NFL anymore.  I have gradually pulled away over the past several years, as the Bears have downtended and the game has morphed into a giant hip hop/bro culture party that I care not to attend.

My interest in football is as follows :

1. High School

2. College

3. Pro

So naturally, the interest in Pro Football would be the first on the chopping block for me in terms of interest and viewership.

A few weeks ago, I was flipping thru the channels on a Sunday and I came upon the Fox Sunday NFL Pregame Show.  These shows have become unwatchable for me, as they are basically a brofest where ex players wear tight fitting suits to show off their "guns" and announcers enable the ghetto/bro culture that has engulfed the game.

The crowning jewel of this pre game fiasco occurred when portly Terry Bradshaw started dancing with the ex players as if they were under a disco ball at a club on a Saturday night.  Some would say this is entertaining.  To me, its clickbait.  I switched the channel, which is what millions of other ex NFL fans are doing in increasing numbers .

This NFL ghetto/bro culture is seeping down now into the college and high school level.  While it attracts youth viewership and interest, it repels the casual fan who was a regular consumer of the NFL for decades.

This is the direction we are heading in.

Its a generational thing.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by DrivenT
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1 minute ago, Muda69 said:

Do you wear a shirt and tie on the sideline during a game?  Why or why not?

 

I absolutely wear a shirt on the sideline every week. Going shirtless would absolutely be unprofessional.  Never do I wear a tie. The norm today is to wear a coaching polo sans tie. Not sure what a tie has to do with coaching ability (NICK SABAN).  I do always wear slacks though, never shorts. But I do not care if others wear shorts, just not my deal. Some traditions have just changed. Most people don't dress for church anymore either. Not sure it lessons their commitment to worshiping though.

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1 hour ago, Patch33 said:

 Never do I wear a tie. The norm today is to wear a coaching polo sans tie. 

Unprofessional.  Look classy, be classy.

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4 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Unprofessional.  Look classy, be classy.

Soooooooooo a tie makes you a classy person? That is the measuring stick? Hitler wore a tie every day.  Class guy.

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