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Muda69

Former NFL player confirmed as 1st diagnosis of CTE in living patient

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http://abcnews.go.com/US/nfl-player-confirmed-1st-diagnosis-cte-living-patient/story?id=51181721

Quote

Researchers in Chicago report that they have detected evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, more commonly known as CTE, in a living patient for the first time.

Currently, CTE, a degenerative brain disease found in those with a history of repetitive brain trauma, can only be formally diagnosed after an autopsy. But a new study indicates researchers may be one step closer to being able to diagnose the disease while a patient is still alive by detecting deposits of tau proteins.

Scans performed on 14 retired NFL players while they were still alive indicated the presence of tau, a type of protein that clumps up over neural cells that have been damaged, according to a study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The protein slowly spreads throughout the brain, killing brain cells, according to the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

When one of the former players died, doctors were able to determine whether the "distinctive CTE pattern" that resulted in his scan actually indicated the presence of the disease.

Once the man's brain was examined after his death, doctors made the official CTE diagnosis, according to the study.

The man was 59 when his brain was scanned, according to the study. Two years later, at age 61, the man's wife noticed that he had been experiencing progressive motor deficits, such as the inability to button his shirts, zip his pants or tie his shoes. Eventually, he was no longer able to feed himself. He had also developed muscle twitching in his arms and decreased muscle mass in his shoulders and arms, the study states, and in addition to what doctors presumed was CTE he also suffered from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often called ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

In the final months of his life, the man was admitted to a nursing home for dehydration, failure to thrive, progressive dysphagia, incontinence, progressive neck and limb weakness, and slurred speech, according to the study.

The man began playing football at 11 years old and continued until he retired from the league at 33, which placed his "cumulative lifetime risk exposure" at 22 years, according to the study.

....

How sad.  Is the very real chance of this happening to your child worth the risk?

 

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Cheese and rice!!!!  Just go get in a car, driver or passenger, your rick is greater of dying than most anything.  I am so sick and tired of people being like Chicken Little.  THE SKY IS FALLING, THE SKY IS FALLING!

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9 minutes ago, Major Reisman said:

Cheese and rice!!!!  Just go get in a car, driver or passenger, your rick is greater of dying than most anything.  I am so sick and tired of people being like Chicken Little.  THE SKY IS FALLING, THE SKY IS FALLING!

Why feed the troll?

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Just out of curiosity... What are the symptoms of Lou Gehrig's Disease?  Are they the same as those listed? If so, how do they know the difference?  Interesting information... just not sure how it figures in to the overall debate.  Do Lou Gehrig's patients usually have signs of CTE... or is this the very first set of tests.  What about the other people tested?  

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1 minute ago, Greene County Coach said:

Just out of curiosity... What are the symptoms of Lou Gehrig's Disease?  Are they the same as those listed? If so, how do they know the difference?  Interesting information... just not sure how it figures in to the overall debate.  Do Lou Gehrig's patients usually have signs of CTE... or is this the very first set of tests.  What about the other people tested?  

The symptoms all listed are for ALS. The symptoms for CTE are.

Difficulty thinking (cognitive impairment)

Impulsive behavior.

Depression or apathy.

Short-term memory loss.

Difficulty planning and carrying out tasks (executive function)

Emotional instability.

Substance abuse.

Suicidal thoughts or behavior.

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1 hour ago, Muda69 said:

http://abcnews.go.com/US/nfl-player-confirmed-1st-diagnosis-cte-living-patient/story?id=51181721

How sad.  Is the very real chance of this happening to your child worth the risk?

 

As a person who starting writing about concussions in 1998 way before all this I still say yes. I started to notice players getting more and more concussions on hit that's shouldn't of caused concussions (see Stan Humpries) and wrote my senior (and last long paper I've written) about multi concussion syndrome. I believe I suffer from it and probably have CTE but never played high school or college football. I suffered multiple concussions either outside playing, at home messing around or on the basketball court. I'd like to see more studies on people who played other sports or who didn't play football as long. 

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