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BisonUmpire

40-Second Play Clock

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Indiana has experimented with a 40-second play clock the past couple years along with a couple other states. Based on the rules questionnaire I shared separately it will likely be on the docket again this year. Talking to friends around the country they have no interest in implementing the 40-second play clock and believe their state rules rep is in agreement. They also don't have visible play clocks in most of the rest of the country so that is one barrier. They feel they would need to mandate visible play clocks which is a much more significant expense than just modifying your existing play clock to do 40 or 25.

For coaches and officials, have you preferred the 40/25 clock over the previous 25-second play clock? Were there any issues in your game?

For fans/parents, do you even notice a difference?

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As a coach I like the 40 second clock. I think that it helps with rhythm offensively from a play calling stand point because you have a set amount of time that is constant between each play. In the past, you would have some crews who would be able to set the ball quickly or vice versa and as a coach you would have to adjust like-wise. Now, the spot of the ball is almost an after thought. 

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I love the 40 second clock. I think if some other states adopted it they would quickly see the benefits. I'd like to see it permanent here.

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53 minutes ago, BisonUmpire said:

Indiana has experimented with a 40-second play clock the past couple years along with a couple other states. Based on the rules questionnaire I shared separately it will likely be on the docket again this year. Talking to friends around the country they have no interest in implementing the 40-second play clock and believe their state rules rep is in agreement. They also don't have visible play clocks in most of the rest of the country so that is one barrier. They feel they would need to mandate visible play clocks which is a much more significant expense than just modifying your existing play clock to do 40 or 25.

For coaches and officials, have you preferred the 40/25 clock over the previous 25-second play clock? Were there any issues in your game?

For fans/parents, do you even notice a difference?

As a fan, I loved it and noticed it ... probably though because I was aware of it and looking for the possible changes.  

I could see the argument from a cost perspective of adopting it, but from a purely function aspect to the game, I like it.

50 minutes ago, Coach Nowlin said:

 

 

GIVE ME 40 ALL DAY EVERYDAY and TWICE ON SUNDAYS

Wouldn't that impact your JV quarters? :13_v:

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Like Coach Nowlin said - many of the Evansville schools played in Kentucky week 2.  It was noticeably different in a bad way.  Close games, blowouts, high scoring, low scoring, you name it.  The game is more consistent, has a better flow, and it makes figuring out end of game scenarios much safer and easier to figure out (unless your Southridge... lol).  

I would HATE for Indiana to go away from a 40 second clock.

We may not be able to figure out a playoff system, but at least we can get the game clock management right.   

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40 second play clock is so much better than the 25.  Most play clock operators are good, but there are some in the Northeast quadrant of the state that need some training.

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Love Love Love the 40 second play clock.  Has added soooo much more consistency here in SW Indiana were before there were wildly varying time intervals for whistling the ball ready.  We have the visible play clocks at Gibson Southern.

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From a coaches perspective, I'm not sure I've noticed THAT much of a difference. 

I'd be interested to hear from a official's perspective how they have received the change? I imagine they (officials) would be more apt to side with the old style 25 second clock as it gave them more control over when the play would start and such....?? Don't know though. 

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28 minutes ago, jets said:

From a coaches perspective, I'm not sure I've noticed THAT much of a difference. 

I'd be interested to hear from a official's perspective how they have received the change? I imagine they (officials) would be more apt to side with the old style 25 second clock as it gave them more control over when the play would start and such....?? Don't know though. 

I would disagree I think officials like the 40. One less thing to have to worry a coach complaining about. Blowouts just turn it off or bump it up if need be. Not that hard to handle in those situations 

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24 minutes ago, jets said:

From a coaches perspective, I'm not sure I've noticed THAT much of a difference. 

I'd be interested to hear from a official's perspective how they have received the change? I imagine they (officials) would be more apt to side with the old style 25 second clock as it gave them more control over when the play would start and such....?? Don't know though. 

That’s an interesting point. The 40 second clock provides consistency ... at the expense of flexibility. I can certainly see where a consistent pace to the game would be advantageous, and I have no problem with the change from the 25 sec. clock to the 40. But I can also tell you that there were many, many occasions under the old system where I would hold the ready for play signal an abnormally long time to bleed the game clock in the second half of blowout games. Never had a single complaint from a coach over that.

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From my perspective, don't go back to 25....

Also curious...Officials, what is the biggest change on your end of dealing with "hurry up" types of situations? (i.e. fast tempo offense that wants to snap/freeze count as soon as possible, end of half hurry up situations, etc).

Specifically mechanics, communication

Edited by US 31

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34 minutes ago, US 31 said:

From my perspective, don't go back to 25....

Also curious...Officials, what is the biggest change on your end of dealing with "hurry up" types of situations? (i.e. fast tempo offense that wants to snap/freeze count as soon as possible, end of half hurry up situations, etc).

Specifically mechanics, communication

From my perspective the 40-second clock doesn't affect that at all. We still move with the same urgency we did under the 25-second clock throughout the game (a little quicker in end of half situations). The only difference is with the 25-second clock they can snap the ball when the whistle blows and with a 40-second clock they can snap the ball when the U backs away. Both should be very similar.

The 40-second clock is not about allowing a team to snap the ball quicker. It's about a consistent pace between dead ball and end of play clock. Now it's the same amount of time regardless of time it takes to get the ball spotted or pace of starting the RFP (faster or slower).

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We use 40 second in Texas.  As a parent-fan I thought it made the game smoother, but there's probably a trade-off for that somewhere else.

All the schools/stadiums we have played at have visible play clocks.

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I have to admit that I was not in favor of the 40 second clock.  I am a little old school when it comes to things.  However, I do think the 40 second clock has worked well.  The offense I watch on a weekly basis is not a hurry up.  As I watch the play clock, I figure they are snapping the ball about the same time they would if we were still using a 25 second clock.  I do think it has helped timekeepers be more consistent with the play clock.  I see no reason to go back to a 25 second clock now.

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I would hate to go back to the 25 second clock. It would be like trading a sports car for a mini-van. I LOVE the 40 second clock.

On 12/6/2017 at 1:57 PM, bobref said:

But I can also tell you that there were many, many occasions under the old system where I would hold the ready for play signal an abnormally long time to bleed the game clock in the second half of blowout games. Never had a single complaint from a coach over that.

Good point. On the other side of it, as a coach, I love being able to bleed the 40 second play clock down in those situations. It is has also been used in my area for kind of a "stall ball" game plan with some success. 

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On 12/6/2017 at 12:57 PM, bobref said:

That’s an interesting point. The 40 second clock provides consistency ... at the expense of flexibility. I can certainly see where a consistent pace to the game would be advantageous, and I have no problem with the change from the 25 sec. clock to the 40. But I can also tell you that there were many, many occasions under the old system where I would hold the ready for play signal an abnormally long time to bleed the game clock in the second half of blowout games. Never had a single complaint from a coach over that.

As an official which would you rather have - the blow out game scenario you mention or -

Team B uses its last time out, trailing by 4 points.  Team A has the ball on 3rd and 10, and the game clock has anywhere between 35 - 45 seconds.  Team A is going to take a knee on 3rd down.  

This is why I think the 40 clock results in much safer and consistent end game scenarios.  Yes, it takes the clock out of the official's hands.  But it also takes the uncertainty of a defensive player trying to jump the snap or a QB who says he is taking a knee, then backs up and waits 2-3 seconds before actually doing it.  I hate seeing a close game marred by some kind of Schiano-like move at the end. 

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6 minutes ago, oldtimeqb said:

As an official which would you rather have - the blow out game scenario you mention or -

Team B uses its last time out, trailing by 4 points.  Team A has the ball on 3rd and 10, and the game clock has anywhere between 35 - 45 seconds.  Team A is going to take a knee on 3rd down.  

This is why I think the 40 clock results in much safer and consistent end game scenarios.  Yes, it takes the clock out of the official's hands.  But it also takes the uncertainty of a defensive player trying to jump the snap or a QB who says he is taking a knee, then backs up and waits 2-3 seconds before actually doing it.  I hate seeing a close game marred by some kind of Schiano-like move at the end. 

The counter to your argument is let's say that snap was taken with 48 seconds left. The 40-second play clock would likely start with about 45 seconds left and the offense would have to snap the ball one more time resulting in another potential Schanio-like move. With a 25-second clock the umpire could have to deal with a "very wet ball" that would delay the ball being placed. Then the referee waits until the play clock reaches 23 to start it. No more snap required. Crews could burn 50-60 seconds per play at the end of obvious blowouts. Sometimes that would start in the 3rd quarter! Of course this would not be done if the game is within 1 score, because there is still the possibility of a muffed snap when a team is taking a knee.

Where it does help end of game is the officials can't affect the amount of time an offense can burn if there is any delay in starting the 25-second clock. It starts when the previous play ends so it will be consistent.

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I think we're saying the same thing in a different way.  In a one score game, I will take KNOWING that you have to kill 6-7 seconds when there are 48 seconds left.  That means an immediate kneel down will result in one more snap - which both teams are aware.  

Otherwise with a 25 second, you have the losing team screaming "Blow it in!" and a winning team screaming "Don't set the ball!"  

Then again as officials, maybe fans and coaches screaming is something you're used to.  LOL

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It was good they listened to a small number of teams complaining about a very small % of games that were actually effected by a close out come and probably has inconsistent R's blowing it in at the end of a close game. The avg margin of victory in Indiana is 25 points and growing. When do they address the games that are 35-0 in the first quarter?

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As a fan I love the 40 second clock and don't want to see it changed back to 25 seconds.

 

Now if only basketball would get out of the early 20th century and add a shot clock.

Edited by Alduflux

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