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DrivenT

Coaching Turnover - Heading for an All Time High?

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64 offseason coaching changes is the single annual all time high since The GID started tracking several years ago,

With almost 30 already this short offseason, are we about to see the record broken?

Why all the movement?

Are coaches leaving the profession completely, or just moving on to better jobs?

Potential issues :

* Low stipends

* Long hours

* Too much offseason comittment

* Declining participation

* Entitled, spoiled student athletes

* Declining administrative support

* Poor game attendance - diminishing community involvement

* Aging facilities and equipment

* Concussion - Injury concerns

* Officiating shortage

* Pushback against the advancing "bro culture"

Any others ?

 

 

 

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I only know of 1 coach thus far to leave the profession to the private sector and that was KV's coach.  

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40 minutes ago, DrivenT said:

64 offseason coaching changes is the single annual all time high since The GID started tracking several years ago,

With almost 30 already this short offseason, are we about to see the record broken?

Why all the movement?

Are coaches leaving the profession completely, or just moving on to better jobs?

Potential issues :

* Low stipends-never crossed my mind

* Long hours-never crossed my mind

* Too much offseason comittment-never crossed my mind

* Declining participation-never crossed my mind

* Entitled, spoiled student athletes-witnessing only recently

* Declining administrative support-witnessing only recently

* Poor game attendance - diminishing community involvement-never

* Aging facilities and equipment-never

* Concussion - Injury concerns-maybe

* Officiating shortage-never 

* Pushback against the advancing "bro culture"-seems to be what some schools may want....yes men, as opposed to "bro" culture.

Any others ?

 

 

 

My experiences listed after DT's questions.

Edited by Coach Ellenwood

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48 minutes ago, DrivenT said:

64 offseason coaching changes is the single annual all time high since The GID started tracking several years ago,

With almost 30 already this short offseason, are we about to see the record broken?

Why all the movement?

Are coaches leaving the profession completely, or just moving on to better jobs?

Potential issues :

* Low stipends

* Long hours

* Too much offseason comittment

* Declining participation

* Entitled, spoiled student athletes

* Declining administrative support

* Poor game attendance - diminishing community involvement

* Aging facilities and equipment

* Concussion - Injury concerns

* Officiating shortage

* Pushback against the advancing "bro culture"

Any others ?

 

 

 

I think it's probably just internet trolls driving coaches away.  

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Some of the reasons listed seem unreasonable if a person is quitting coaching because of them.

Your stipend is what it is. You know that going into it. You know as  a coach of the time commitment in-season and out of season. As a parent and a coach, I'm glad there are safety precautions put in place when dealing with concussions. I'm not going quit because of that. Poor attendance or good attendance, I couldn't tell you how many is there during a game. Officiating shortages may affect A.D.'s but not coaches. Definitely not to the point I'd quitting because of lack of officials. Our equipment and facilities aren't great. Others in the area are definitely better/newer but I knew what they were like going into it. It hasn't changed. I've never understood your Bro Culture. If I did, it might make  me want to quit. But I like the kids and most seem to like me. Not having support of the administration would be frustrating I'm sure and might make a coach want to look around if it were really bad. I get that one if it were an issue.

I had noticed that many coaches who have stepped down this year have been coaching a long time. Maybe it was just their time to step away and enjoy other aspects of their life. 

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There is always an exodus of coaches from the game when they hit that 52-55 age range.  I think the exodus is now occurring for many at an even younger age.  The pace of change and the demands on time are accelerating.  Some guys just cant or dont want to keep up.  

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As far as the stipend goes, keep in mind that the Summer rules changed dramatically while many of the veteran coaches were at the helm. Shift from something like weights and conditioning 3 times a week to actual practices and competitions that go all day or even all weekend; and with literally no change in the stipend for coming close to doubling the time commitment. That is a factor, whether anyone wants to accept that or not.

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Realistically, as a head coach I can tell you that time commitment plays a big role in those decisions. For example, and this is without getting too personal, I have kids that do other stuff while I am in football season. So for me, I am going to miss dance classes, sports, and any other activity they may be involved in that doesn't fall on the weekend. I know this going in, and have accepted that. I think for a lot of guys, once they become head coaches, this plays a huge role in longevity. In addition, I think that the off-season demands play a huge role in longevity. This was a popular discussion among a lot of coaches at clinics this year. As a head coach, I do not feel particularly comfortable not being at every in-season and off-season activity. So for me personally, I am making sacrifices not only in-season but out of season as well. Just a few random thoughts. Obviously there are other factors, and each person's decision is unique to him. I can tell you that there are coaches that think the stipends are not where they need to be. I think everyone agrees with that, but we know that going in.
 

Also, I wanted to add that you need a very understanding spouse to do what you love doing. If my wife wasn't as supportive as she is, being a head coach would be a recipe for divorce/marital difficulties. I love doing what I am doing, and I hope to coach forever. None of it is possible without her carting my kids everywhere and being supportive.

Edited by CoachK_75
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Time commitment is relative for a lot of reasons...

Fresh out of college, new teacher young coach....I didn't give a lick about time commitment.  I was at everything, worked as many summer camps as I could....early mornings, long nights....coached more than one sport....etc, etc.  I loved it.  Loved being around the team, the coaches.  Coaches were my social circle. 

Fast forward (more than) a few years.  

I'm married.  I have three kids, they are in their own sports, activities.  Wife and I both work full time.  Now I have commitments well beyond what I had as a single, young coach.  Summers are a much busier time for football than they used to be (for better and worse).

My wife understands, I was a coach when we met.  She is a trooper and shoulders a lot of the burden all fall.  But we are naive to think the time commitment today is the same as it was 15 years ago...maybe even less than 10 years ago.

I (and my family) are very fortunate.  A very understanding Head Coach, who prioritizes our ability to make time for our families, coach our kids teams, get to their games, etc.  And a large staff that can spread the work load.

The pressures for time, are MUCH greater on small/mid-sized staff's where they have less shoulders for that "burden". 

 

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6 minutes ago, US 31 said:

Time commitment is relative for a lot of reasons...

Fresh out of college, new teacher young coach....I didn't give a lick about time commitment.  I was at everything, worked as many summer camps as I could....early mornings, long nights....coached more than one sport....etc, etc.  I loved it.  Loved being around the team, the coaches.  Coaches were my social circle. 

Fast forward (more than) a few years.  

I'm married.  I have three kids, they are in their own sports, activities.  Wife and I both work full time.  Now I have commitments well beyond what I had as a single, young coach.  Summers are a much busier time for football than they used to be (for better and worse).

My wife understands, I was a coach when we met.  She is a trooper and shoulders a lot of the burden all fall.  But we are naive to think the time commitment today is the same as it was 15 years ago...maybe even less than 10 years ago.

I (and my family) are very fortunate.  A very understanding Head Coach, who prioritizes our ability to make time for our families, coach our kids teams, get to their games, etc.  And a large staff that can spread the work load.

The pressures for time, are MUCH greater on small/mid-sized staff's where they have less shoulders for that "burden". 

 

US31 I have three kids as well. It was much easier playing man to man defense when we had two. This zone defense stuff is tough. Ha ha.

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2 hours ago, DrivenT said:

64 offseason coaching changes is the single annual all time high since The GID started tracking several years ago,

With almost 30 already this short offseason, are we about to see the record broken?

Why all the movement?

Are coaches leaving the profession completely, or just moving on to better jobs?

Potential issues :

* Low stipends

* Long hours

* Too much offseason comittment

* Declining participation

* Entitled, spoiled student athletes

* Declining administrative support

* Poor game attendance - diminishing community involvement

* Aging facilities and equipment

* Concussion - Injury concerns

* Officiating shortage

* Pushback against the advancing "bro culture"

Any others ?

 

 

 

What is “bro culture”?

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28 minutes ago, CoachK_75 said:

US31 I have three kids as well. It was much easier playing man to man defense when we had two. This zone defense stuff is tough. Ha ha.

It's amazing, playing man-to-man with kids, how many things slip through the seams just like you are playing zone.

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1 minute ago, foxbat said:

It's amazing, playing man-to-man with kids, how many things slip through the seams just like you are playing zone.

When grandparents are in town we go two deep, man under...that helps a lot. :02_v:

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6 minutes ago, FormerColtsFan said:

What is “bro culture”?

Something DT insists runs rampant in an occupation he's not a part of. 

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37 minutes ago, Veechy63 said:

Something DT insists runs rampant in an occupation he's not a part of. 

Its not hard to see Veechy63.  Its all over TV at every level  High school/college/pro

https://www.google.com/search?q=flying+chest+bump&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=9QVM7xE0BY2sUM%3A%2C7Rb1JXEOVHY8SM%2C_&usg=__tp9xUkwTcrRWvxZ3MEwkfXP-zIQ%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi3-a33joXYAhVQkeAKHfScA8cQ9QEIKzAA#imgrc=yKSpcVDRLhIeFM:

 

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4 minutes ago, DrivenT said:

I hardly see enthusiasm as "bro culture". Maybe our age differences change our viewpoints on this. To me "bro culture" has more to do with interaction outside the game and off of the field. 

Edited by Veechy63

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1 minute ago, Veechy63 said:

I hardly see enthusiasm as "bro culture". Maybe our age differences change our viewpoints on this. To me "bro culture" has more to do with interaction outside the game and off of the field. 

Noted

 

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8 hours ago, DrivenT said:

I think the exodus is now occurring for many at an even younger age.  The pace of change and the demands on time are accelerating.  Some guys just cant or dont want to keep up.  

Id wager turnover rates in print media are way higher.  

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7 hours ago, FormerColtsFan said:

What is “bro culture”?

Something an older person finds to criticize a younger person for.  Darn kids.  

I think this was the most discussed topic by older coaches at the last clinic.....or maybe not

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56 minutes ago, DrivenT said:

Flying chest bumps do not remove the respect between players and coaches.  Are high five's ok?  Are handshakes ok?  Are pats on the head ok?  People have different opinions on what is acceptable.  These are a norm in society now. 

Are you just assuming that since they are doing this, they must be disrespecting coaches outside the lines?  Are you assuming the coaches are just pandering to the players?

I've watched you talk about Bro Culture for a while now, and like Veechy, I don't understand.  If you were talking about coaches' relationships with players getting too friendly or "broing out" after practice, I would understand.  But you keep referring to just the chest bump thing.  Many find it refreshing to see coaches getting enthusiastic.  I simply don't see the issue with it.

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Different strokes . . . but "bro culture" seems to be working out for some people

 

 

Edited by El Tigre
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Where is the line between Coach and 'bro drawn?

 

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2 hours ago, Von2Rov said:

Flying chest bumps do not remove the respect between players and coaches.  Are high five's ok?  Are handshakes ok?  Are pats on the head ok?  People have different opinions on what is acceptable.  These are a norm in society now. 

Are you just assuming that since they are doing this, they must be disrespecting coaches outside the lines?  Are you assuming the coaches are just pandering to the players?

I've watched you talk about Bro Culture for a while now, and like Veechy, I don't understand.  If you were talking about coaches' relationships with players getting too friendly or "broing out" after practice, I would understand.  But you keep referring to just the chest bump thing.  Many find it refreshing to see coaches getting enthusiastic.  I simply don't see the issue with it.

I lament the loss of proper decorum between coach and player, at all levels.  Too much physical "bro" interaction breaks down the lines of authority and responsibility between the two, in my opinion.  Every time I see a retirement announcement of a Pat Parks, Phil Jensen, Rick Streiff, etc, these lines get further blurred.  It is a passing of the torch that denigrates the game and its overall decorum, rather than enhancing it.  

Edited by DrivenT

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