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Muda69

School Choice Is a Noble Cause

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http://reason.com/archives/2019/01/23/school-choice-is-a-noble-cause

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It's School Choice Week.

School choice is a noble cause. In much of America, parents have little or no control over where their kids attend school. Local governments assign schools by ZIP code.

Having choice is better. Whether it's vouchers, scholarships, charters, private schools, or just having options among public schools, choice makes some schools better because educators have to compete for parents' trust. Competition makes most everything better.

So we need competition among ideas, too.

There isn't a lot of that in America's schools.

In many places, every kid is taught:

—America is largely cruel and unfair, especially to minorities.

—Political leaders must manage most of life.

—Under capitalism, rich people prosper by exploiting the poor.

To give students another perspective, I started a charity that offers teachers free study guides, sample lessons, and videos that introduce students to free market ideas: Stossel in the Classroom.

Most of the videos are versions of my reporting for Stossel TV, Fox, and ABC News, specially edited for students.

In these videos, kids hear from people in parts of the world where markets are not as free and people suffer because of it. After watching, one high school student told us that he now understood that America is "the rare place where you can write the script of your own life."

That idea is important to kids, who don't always feel that they're in control of their lives.

One student, Gabriel Miller, told us, "When I originally went to school, it was all taught from one side: This country is horrible; because you are a minority you can't make it. It made me dislike the country. But after the videos were shown, I felt ashamed for what I initially believed."

He then enlisted in the National Guard. "I wanted to give back for, not only giving my family so much opportunity, but also to protect, defend and serve the people in the United States."

"We never really thought like this before," his classmate Diony Perez told us. "We're taught that the government is... responsible for us and we have to trust them in doing everything for us."

After watching videos about entrepreneurs, Perez decided he didn't want government to take charge of his life. Instead, he started his own business. His company delivers cars to customers without them having to step foot in a dealership.

Students say certain ideas in the videos stand out because they are different from the anti-market messages they usually hear in school.

One that stuck with many was "unintended consequences"—the idea that laws meant to protect people often end up harming them instead.

A higher minimum wage, for example. Most Americans support that idea, and it does raise some workers' pay. But a minimum also prices young and marginal workers out of jobs by making it illegal for them to get starter experience at lower pay.

Every law, every regulation is announced with the loftiest of intentions—making the poor richer, protecting the environment, guaranteeing food safety—but again and again, the laws not only fail to achieve their stated objectives but also make things worse by limiting choices and making it harder for businesses and customers to find mutually satisfying solutions.

Few students understand that. In fact, these days most are more pro-government, even socialist, than their millennial, generation X and boomer predecessors.

Watching these videos in class will help many students open their minds.

One student told us the video series "contradicts all these beliefs about how socialism is great."

I would hope so. Socialism is definitely not great.

Fortunately, about 10 million students will watch these videos in class this year. Some will change their minds.

"I went to my mom. I was like, 'Do you know who's really paying for all this government stuff?'" said Diony.

If you know teachers who might want to use the videos in their classrooms, please tell them about SITC.org. All our resources are free.

School Choice Week isn't just about letting kids and parents choose where they go to school. It also means being able to choose what ideas they learn—including the concept of choice itself.

Kudos to Mr. Stossel.

 

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10 minutes ago, DanteEstonia said:

Are you sure about that?

Sure about what?

 

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2 minutes ago, DanteEstonia said:

 

Every point you have made.

If there is a point you want to dispute then dispute it, and stop wasting time by playing childish games.

 

Edited by Muda69

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“Choose what ideas to learn”?

Shouldnt they learn all ideas and then decide?

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11 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

“Choose what ideas to learn”?

Shouldnt they learn all ideas and then decide?

Show me a government school that requires their students learn ALL ideas in all required subject matters.  Isn't that what approved teaching curriculum are for?   

Shouldn't I as a parent have a choice in what ideas are presented to my children?  Isn't that one of the reasons many parents home school or send their children to religious-affiliated schools?

 

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4 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Shouldn't I as a parent have a choice in what ideas are presented to my children?

Yes, if you want to suppress your children's education.

 

4 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Isn't that one of the reasons many parents home school or send their children to religious-affiliated schools?

If it is, they are choosing home schooling for the wrong reasons imho

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1 minute ago, gonzoron said:

Yes, if you want to suppress your children's education.

And again, government schools requires their students learn ALL ideas in all required subject matters?  Is so do you have links to the relevant legislation?

 

1 minute ago, gonzoron said:

If it is, they are choosing home schooling for the wrong reasons imho

What are the right reasons for home schooling, in your opinion?  The right reasons for a religious-affiliated school, in your opinion?

 

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1 minute ago, Muda69 said:

And again, government schools requires their students learn ALL ideas in all required subject matters?

Please point out at what spot in one of my previous posts I asserted that.

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2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Please point out at what spot in one of my previous posts I asserted that.

Your quote:

Quote

Shouldnt they learn all ideas and then decide?

 

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Just now, Muda69 said:

Your quote:

 

I don't see any mention of Government schools in my quote. Sorry, try again.

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2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

I don't see any mention of Government schools in my quote. Sorry, try again.

Then what exactly did you mean by your statement, in the context of school choice made by Mr. Stossel in the initial post of this thread?  His statement was:

Quote

It also means being able to choose what ideas they learn—including the concept of choice itself.

 

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1 minute ago, Muda69 said:

Then what exactly did you mean by your statement, in the context of school choice made by Mr. Stossel in the initial post of this thread?  His statement was:

 

Being able to "choose what ideas to learn" isn't education. Imho, it's the suppression of education. 

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2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Being able to "choose what ideas to learn" isn't education. Imho, it's the suppression of education. 

So how do traditional government schools supposedly eliminate that suppression?  Don't "educational professionals" get to choose what ideas to teach to their captive audiences?

 

 

 

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Just now, Muda69 said:

So how do traditional government schools supposedly eliminate that suppression?  Don't "educational professionals" get to choose what ideas to teach to their captive audiences?

I've also never said government schools teach all ideas. You seem to be fixated on government schools.

Are parents of government school students incapable of teaching their children ideas they may not learn about in those schools?

Does the government school prevent parents from teaching their children different ideas at home? I haven't been arrested for it yet, but I can only speak from personal experience.

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6 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

I've also never said government schools teach all ideas. You seem to be fixated on government schools.

Yes, because I firmly believe that that government school edifice needs to be dismantled.  This school choice movement is a means to that end.

  

6 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Are parents of government school students incapable of teaching their children ideas they may not learn about in those schools?

Depends.  Some here on the GID believe you shouldn't present any ideas to your children unless you are a subject matter expert in the field those ideas are a part of.  

 

6 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Does the government school prevent parents from teaching their children different ideas at home? I haven't been arrested for it yet, but I can only speak from personal experience.

In a way yes.   Say you teach your child one way to perform simple multiplication, and your government school teaches another.    Your child takes a test where they not only have to provide the correct answer but also "show their work".  Your child receives a substandard grade because his "work" was your method, and not the state approved method.  

 

Edited by Muda69
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26 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Your child receives a substandard grade because his "work" was your method, and not the state approved method.

Did you give him a passing grade at home if he used the state approved method?

28 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Yes, because I firmly believe that that government school edifice needs to be dismantled. 

So you believe there should be fewer choices for schooling children?

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2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Did you give him a passing grade at home if he used the state approved method?

No.  Did you?

2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

So you believe there should be fewer choices for schooling children?

If government schools is one of those choices, then yes.

Let the free market rule.

 

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33 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

I've also never said government schools teach all ideas. You seem to be fixated on government schools.

Are parents of government school students incapable of teaching their children ideas they may not learn about in those schools?

Does the government school prevent parents from teaching their children different ideas at home? I haven't been arrested for it yet, but I can only speak from personal experience.

What a novel concept....parents being involved in the education process......I guess I never made the connection.

 

 

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Just now, Impartial_Observer said:

What a novel concept....parents being involved in the education process......I guess I never made the connection.

Isn't that the ultimate expression of homeschooling, parents being involved in the education process?

 

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31 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Yes, because I firmly believe that that government school edifice needs to be dismantled.  This school choice movement is a means to that end. 

 

 

1 minute ago, Muda69 said:

 

If government schools is one of those choices, then yes.

Let the free market rule.

 

So which is it? You want it to be dismantled, or you want it to be one of the choices?

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1 minute ago, gonzoron said:

 

So which is it? You want it to be dismantled, or you want it to be one of the choices?

I want it to be dismantled.  

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28 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Did you give him a passing grade at home if he used the state approved method?

 

26 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

No.  Did you?

So tell me again why you think home schooling is better? Were you or any of your children home schooled in lieu of "government schooling"?

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29 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Isn't that the ultimate expression of homeschooling, parents being involved in the education process?

 

No! As I've stated a thousand times your kid's education is YOUR responsibility. Regardless of where they attend school. 

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