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swordfish

The Democrat's roster for a Trump - beater in 2020

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Cory Booker Is Running for President. Must He Run Away from School Choice?: http://reason.com/blog/2019/02/01/cory-booker-president-school-choice

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When Cory Booker first ran for the U.S. Senate in 2012, he was known as a supporter of school choice. Now Sen. Booker is aiming to be the Democratic Party's presidential nominee. Will he have to run away from education reform to do so?

On Friday, Booker appeared on the front steps of his home in Newark, New Jersey, to take questions from the press. Asked about his long history of support for charter schools, Booker pivoted.

"Our teachers are ridiculously underpaid in America," he said, according to BuzzFeed. "I'm going to run the boldest pro–public school [campaign] there is."

 

Before joining the Senate, Booker served as mayor of Newark, where he took a keen interest in school choice. He enthusiastically supported vouchers and charter schools, he co-founded a pro-charter group called Excellent Education for Everyone, and he served on the board of Democrats for Education Reform. He was seen as a close ally of the reform-minded Betsy DeVos, and he spoke to her group, American Federation for Children, in as 2016.

"I cannot ever stand up and stand against a parent having options because I benefited from my parents having options," he said.

But when President Donald Trump picked DeVos to be secretary of education, Booker voted against her. He later insisted to CNN's Jake Tapper that he hadn't changed his mind about school choice but voted against DeVos because of changes he believed she would make to the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights.

If Booker is downplaying his enthusiasm for school choice, it's obvious why: To capture the Democratic nomination, he thinks he'll need to shed his image as a third-way Democrat and court the left. Still, it's a depressing turn of events. A dozen years ago, being pro–education reform was a tactic for bringing moderates and independents into the Democratic fold. Now it's a liability.

In 2016, Reason's Matt Welch predicted that the next Democratic president "will be terrible on education policy," citing a debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in which neither expressed even the slightest interest in holding bad teachers accountable. Trump's unexpected victory may have delayed this prophecy, but as the energy on the Democratic side moves further left on all sorts of issues—from Medicare for All to the Green New Deal to basic questions like whether capitalism is better than socialism—Welch's prediction might still come true.

Well the obvious solution is the get the federal government of out of the education business entirely.  Until then you will have flip-flopping.  The quest for power trumps principles.

 

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50 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Well the obvious solution is the get the federal government of out of the education business entirely

Vouchers and Charter Schools have shown to be failures. Both financially and educationally. Perhaps that's why he has changed his stance.

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On 1/28/2019 at 11:58 AM, swordfish said:

It would not be like Trump to simply give up.

He gave up on shutting down the government until he got his wall.  Ann Coulter called him a wussie because of how weak he looked.

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On 2/3/2019 at 8:59 AM, gonzoron said:

Vouchers and Charter Schools have shown to be failures. Both financially and educationally. 

Unbiased citations please.

 

 

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On ‎2‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 8:59 AM, gonzoron said:

Vouchers and Charter Schools have shown to be failures. Both financially and educationally. Perhaps that's why he has changed his stance.

Reality is more complicated.  In Indianapolis, some charter schools have done quite well, especially for minority students. 

Vouchers are a different animal. There aren't "voucher schools", vouchers are a mechanism to pay tuition costs at private schools. In a practical sense, the  actual "voucher schools" are the many religiously-based private schools in Indiana, such as several of the grade school-level, parish- and diocesan-supported Catholic schools in Indianapolis, that probably would have closed down by now if Indiana did not have a voucher system.  Those schools generally serve their students as well as other private and public schools. But for many folks, like me, the use of public funds to support these religiously-based schools seems unconstitutional, even if the SCOTUS believes otherwise. 

https://www.wfyi.org/news/articles/two-indianapolis-based-studies-point-to-charter-school-success

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Elizabeth Warren Formally Declares Candidacy, Enters the 2020 Race: http://reason.com/blog/2019/02/09/elizabeth-warren-president-announcement

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) is officially a contender for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. She made her intentions clear during a speech in Lawrence, Massachusetts, Saturday morning. Her campaign kicked off with an endorsement from Rep. Joseph Kennedy (D–Mass.), who introduced her.

"We are here to say enough is enough," said Warren in her remarks. "The man in the White House is not the cause of what is broken. He is just the latest and most extreme symptom of what has gone wrong in America—a product of a rigged system that props up the rich and powerful and kicks dirt on everyone else."

The senator accused rich people of waging class warfare against the working class for years, and vowed to fight back.

 

"Our fight is for big structural change," Warren continued. "This is the fight of our lives."

She also vowed to break up monopolies, promised to invest in education and child care, and praised the Green New Deal.

Warren, a progressive populist, is arguably the furthest-left-leaning candidate in the race—at least until Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–VT) makes his candidacy official. Sanders and Warren differ in some respects: Most notably, Sanders would like to replace the capitalist system, whereas Warren only aspires to reform it. But like Sanders, Warren is primarily fixated on wealth inequality as the most pressing problem facing Americans—and her strategy for addressing it is to take money away from wealthy people.

How much money? Warren's proposal would tax the assets of the very wealthy at 2 percent annually, meaning they would pay it again and again every year. But if such a policy became law, most rich people would probably find ways to avoid it. The plan is best described as "a symbolic declaration of opposition to the existence of outsized wealth, irrespective of how it was obtained," wrote Reason's Peter Suderman in his negative appraisal.

Warren is also a staunch opponent of school choice reform: She opposed a statewide ballot initiative that would have allowed more charter schools to open in Massachusetts. (The initiative was defeated in 2018.) Warren's fealty to the teachers unions, a powerful group within the Democratic Party, positions her to run well to the left of rival Sen. Cory Booker (D­–NJ), who has a history of supporting education reform.

There's one officially in the ring.

Stuff like this will may do here in though:

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Another one jumps into the ring for the Democrat side of the uni-party: http://reason.com/blog/2019/02/10/sen-amy-klobuchar-announces-2020-run

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In front of a snow-drenched crowd on Boom Island, Minnesota, Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar announced her 2020 presidential intentions. "I am running for this job for every person who wants their work recognized and rewarded" and "every parent who wants a better world for their kids," said Klobuchar. "I am running for every American." And no matter what, "I'll lead from the heart."

She went on to call for a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United, for passing a law that automatically registers Americans to vote at age 18, for universal background checks for gun owners, for "sweeping" legislation addressing climate change, and for "net neutrality for all."

"If you don't know the difference between a hack and Slack, it's time to get off the digital highway," said Klobuchar in a cringe-worth line apparently meant to demonstrate her tech savvy.

 

The 56-year-old, three-term senator has received less national attention than fellow Democratic senators like Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), both of whom have already announced their 2020 candidacies. Klobuchar could benefit from that if it means she's seen as having less baggage, too. But that reputation suffered last week with the release of several stories describing her as a terror to work for.

Klobuchar "demeaned and berated her staff almost daily, subjecting them to bouts of explosive rage and regular humiliation within the office, according to interviews and dozens of emails reviewed" by Buzzfeed. Her office had the highest staff turnover rate in the Senate between 2001-2016, according to Politico. And then there's this, from HuffPost:

Talked to a Franken staffer who had an odd experience with a Klobuchar staffer... https://t.co/yc7giMOIFcpic.twitter.com/SG3hzQWZd2

— Amanda Terkel (@aterkel) February 8, 2019

Liberal pundits have rallied around Klobuchar anyway, with many dismissing the idea that how a senator treats subordinates should matter when assessing her fitness for office. Some suggested it was only an issue because she's a woman.

But in general, and especially with Klobuchar campaigning as the nice Midwestern anti-Trump, her temperament behind the scenes matters. Blowing up at staff and driving them away at high rates don't suggest "Minnesota nice," nor someone who may handle presidential pressure well. More so than being a member of Congress even, head of state is a position that requires restraint and good people skills to do well.

....

 

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18 minutes ago, TrojanDad said:

It seems your party forgives its own.....just doesn't extend forgiveness to non-Dems.....

https://wtvr.com/2019/02/11/black-leaders-call-for-forgiveness-second-chance-for-northam/

 

“your party”????

Use of blackface isn’t a political issue. It’s a human issue. In my opinion and the opinion of many others, it shouldn’t be used. Period. Nor should it be excused or condoned.

 

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4 minutes ago, TrojanDad said:

It seems your party forgives its own.....just doesn't extend forgiveness to non-Dems.....

https://wtvr.com/2019/02/11/black-leaders-call-for-forgiveness-second-chance-for-northam/

 

Actually, that's more specific to Black Virginians.  A related poll shows Virginians split 47-47 with Democrats at 40% to resign and 57% not to resign and Republicans at 56% to resign with 42% not to resign.  I would not consider 57% as indicative that the party forgives its own given that, if you ask about other issues facing Democrats, the numbers end up in the 70s, 80s, and maybe even 90s.  For example, only 30% of Democrats approved of Trump's SOTU ... which is only 10% difference than those that think that Northam should resign.  In another words, 10% more Virginia Democrats think Northam should resign than Democrats who liked Trump's SOTU speech.

In related news, that of Virginia  Lt. Gov Fairfax, that issue of forgiveness doesn't seem to have foundation as Democrats both inside and outside the state are pushing for Fairfax to resign.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/08/politics/dems-justin-fairfax-resign/index.html

FTA:

But now that a second woman, Meredith Watson, has accused the Virginia lieutenant governor of rape, prominent Virginia and national Democrats are not holding back and are roundly calling on the 39-year old African-American politician to resign.

He lost a major bloc of support Friday night when the Democratic members of the Virginia House of Delegates and state Senate issued a joint statement calling on him to step down.

"Due to the serious nature of these allegations, we believe Lieutenant Governor Fairfax can no longer fulfill his duties to the Commonwealth," the statement read. "He need to addess this as a private citizen. The time has come for him to step down."

And in another major moment about an hour later, the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus wrote that its members "believe it is best for Lt. Governor Fairfax to step down from his position."

"While we believe that anyone accused of such a grievous and harmful act must receive the due process prescribed by the Constitution, we can't see it in the best interest of the Commonwealth of Virginia for the Lieutenant Governor to remain in his role," the group added.

Late Friday night, both of Virginia's powerful Democratic US senators -- Tim Kaine and Mark Warner -- called on Fairfax to resign in separate statements.

...

National Democrats also had held off calling for Fairfax to step down after Tyson's allegations. But, like their Virginia counterparts, they have now called on him to leave office.

Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey had described Tyson's allegations as "deeply disturbing" and said they "should be thoroughly investigated." But he did not call for Fairfax to step down.

After Watson stepped forward, however, Booker ratcheted up his call.

"The multiple detailed allegations against the Lt. Gov. of Virginia are deeply troubling," he tweeted. "They are serious, credible, and corroborated by others. It is no longer appropriate for him to serve. He should resign."

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, after calling for an investigation into Tyson's allegations, said the accusation by Watson was "sickening and horrendous" and should end Fairfax's time as lieutenant governor.

"I believe Meredith Watson and Dr. Tyson, and it was extremely brave for them to come forward," she said. "Mr. Fairfax should resign and no longer serve the Commonwealth of Virginia."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat, echoed her colleagues' calls.

"These credible and troubling allegations from Dr. Vanessa Tyson and Meredith Watson make it clear that Lt. Gov Fairfax should resign. My heart goes out to these brave women and their families," Warren said on Twitter.

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a prospective 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, also joined the calls for Fairfax to step down.

"The Governor feels Lt Governor Fairfax should resign. These allegations are deeply disturbing," said his spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt.

Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro said Fairfax should resign, and reiterated that Gov. Ralph Northam also must go.

He tweeted, "Last Friday I called on Gov. Northam to resign immediately. Two days ago I stated that I believe the claim regarding Lt. Governor Fairfax. Tonight, I call on both of them to step aside and allow the great state of Virginia to heal and move forward."

California Sen. Kamala Harris joined the call for Fairfax to resign. The Democratic presidential candidate said on Twitter, "The allegations by Dr. Vanessa Tyson and Meredith Watson are corroborated, painful stories of sexual assault and rape. It's clear Virginia Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax should resign his office."

Sen. Bernie Sanders, a Vermont independent and a likely Democratic presidential candidate, also urged Fairfax to step down. He tweeted, "I agree with the joint statement from the Virginia House and Senate Democrats. Very serious and credible allegations have been made by two women against Lieutenant Governor Fairfax. He needs to resign."

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1 hour ago, gonzoron said:

“your party”????

Use of blackface isn’t a political issue. It’s a human issue. In my opinion and the opinion of many others, it shouldn’t be used. Period. Nor should it be excused or condoned.

Either should whiteface, or yellowface, or redface, or greenface....................

 

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One Cheer for Kamala’s Cannabis Candor: http://reason.com/archives/2019/02/13/one-cheer-for-kamalas-cannabis-candor

Quote

How much credit should a politician get in 2019 for admitting that she smoked pot in college? Not much, especially if she only recently came around to the view that people should not be arrested for doing what she did.

But Kamala Harris did say something noteworthy when she was asked about marijuana during a radio interview on Monday. She acknowledged the importance of fun, a point that should be made more often in discussions of drug policy.

"Have you ever smoked?" Charlamagne tha God, cohost of the syndicated radio show The Breakfast Club, asked Harris, a California senator who last month announced that she is seeking the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. "I have," Harris replied. "And I inhaled."

 

Charlamagne was impressed by this revelation: "See, I like stuff like that. That's a real honest answer." Harris also seemed to think it was a big deal. "I just broke loose!" she exclaimed.

Please. The behavior that Harris admitted is normal for people of her generation. Harris is 54. Survey data indicate that 52 percent of Americans her age have tried marijuana; allowing for an estimated underreporting rate of 20 percent, the true figure is probably more like 62 percent.

Nor was Harris breaking ground by being honest about her cannabis consumption. Fifteen years ago, several Democratic presidential contenders, including both of the men who ended up on the 2004 ticket, readily admitted they had used marijuana.

Even the senator's reference to Bill Clinton's weaselly 1992 response to the question is old hat. "When I was a kid," Barack Obama, then a U.S. senator, told an interviewer in 2006, "I inhaled—frequently. That was the point."

Congratulating Harris for her cannabis candor seems especially inappropriate given her evasive response to a question about legalization during the same interview. "They say you oppose legalizing weed," Charlamagne said. "That's not true," Harris replied. "Half of my family is from Jamaica. Are you kidding me?"

Based on that exchange, listeners might be surprised to learn that Harris did not come out in favor of legalization until a year ago and did not sign onto a bill that would repeal the federal ban until last May. By that point, two-thirds of Americans (and three-quarters of Democrats) had turned against pot prohibition.

.....

More political flip-flopping.  *yawn*

 

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1 minute ago, Impartial_Observer said:

More importantly did she inhale?

Did you actually read the article? Apparently not:

Quote

"I have," Harris replied. "And I inhaled."

 

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28 minutes ago, Impartial_Observer said:

More importantly did she inhale?

You might ask the Governor.......

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50 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Did you actually read the article? Apparently not:

 

No, because I'm sure she's not the only person in the world who smoked a little weed in college. 

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On 2/12/2019 at 12:36 PM, gonzoron said:

“your party”????

Use of blackface isn’t a political issue. It’s a human issue. In my opinion and the opinion of many others, it shouldn’t be used. Period. Nor should it be excused or condoned.

 

Not sure where you are going.  No one ever said blackface should be used, condoned or excused.

My point is that it seems the Dems (aka your party) seems to be more forgiving when their own party members have judgment errors in this regard, as opposed to non-party members.  In addition to the VA governor lately, seems not much of an issue is being made of Joy Behar's past....at least not much by ABC.

So yea...hypocrisy can certainly be a political issue.

Edited by TrojanDad

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3 hours ago, TrojanDad said:

No one ever said blackface should be used, condoned or excused

Not true.

3 hours ago, TrojanDad said:

Dems (aka your party)

Not my party. I'm unaffiliated with any political party.

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3 hours ago, TrojanDad said:

hypocrisy can certainly be a political issue

Agreed. Use of blackface, however, as I originally stated, is not a political issue.

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23 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Not true.

Not my party. I'm unaffiliated with any political party.

Only one person I know who stated blackface should have been worn....and your comment sure seems political to me.

My comment was about selective accountability......that's not political....that's real.

image.png.71306869c53e2ffd45c13d1f83c77358.png

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On 2/13/2019 at 9:58 AM, Impartial_Observer said:

No, because I'm sure she's not the only person in the world who smoked a little weed in college. 

What makes her special IO is that she smoked her weed while listening to Snoop Dog and Tupac....even through graduating in 1986 was years before they both released their first songs.  She is indeed special....

 

26 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Agreed. Use of blackface, however, as I originally stated, is not a political issue.

image.png.fdaf55972038695d135e3073096ff464.png

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On 2/10/2019 at 9:30 AM, gonzoron said:

She should have just worn blackface. No problems then. 

 

43 minutes ago, TrojanDad said:

..and your comment sure seems political to me.

I'm sorry your sarcasm detector is broken. Hope you can get that fixed.

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