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Coach Nowlin

40 Sec Clock: HERE TO STAY: Thank You Indiana

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17 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Can still cost $ to install and maintain.

So it is a convenience item, not a competitive or safety issue.  Got it.

Should those fields that choose not to have a visible play clock be penalized by the IHSAA in some matter?  Maybe they cannot host tournament games?

 

 

There is a competitive side. If a QB and/or coaches can see the play clock, they can better manage the pace of the game they want to play at; which could mean hurrying the pace, or slowing it down to protect a lead or keep the other team's offense off the field.

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Just now, Irishman said:

There is a competitive side. If a QB and/or coaches can see the play clock, they can better manage the pace of the game they want to play at; which could mean hurrying the pace, or slowing it down to protect a lead or keep the other team's offense off the field.

Meh, again this is children playing a game.  Not adults in the college game or professionals in the NFL.

 

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2 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Meh, again this is children playing a game.  Not adults in the college game or professionals in the NFL.

 

I get it, but your original claim was there was no competitive edge. So, your reply does not address the fact that I had explained that there is an actual competitive edge to having one. Arguing about the necessity of it based on cost is a different point to the discussion.

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27 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Can still cost $ to install and maintain.

So it is a convenience item, not a competitive or safety issue.  Got it.

Should those fields that choose not to have a visible play clock be penalized by the IHSAA in some matter?  Maybe they cannot host tournament games?

 

 

No, because it is not required field equipment under either the NF or the IHSAA rules. Still not getting your point. My observation was that virtually every school in Indiana has them, from the biggest to the smallest. So the financial "burden" is obviously not much of a burden at all.

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Schools in the nation that do not have them will have a worn out Back Judge !!!   Get those arm exercises in!!

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25 minutes ago, Bobref said:

No, because it is not required field equipment under either the NF or the IHSAA rules. Still not getting your point. My observation was that virtually every school in Indiana has them, from the biggest to the smallest. So the financial "burden" is obviously not much of a burden at all.

It may obviously be a burden to the schools that don't have it.  And basically unnecessary.

 

30 minutes ago, Irishman said:

I get it, but your original claim was there was no competitive edge. So, your reply does not address the fact that I had explained that there is an actual competitive edge to having one. Arguing about the necessity of it based on cost is a different point to the discussion.

Only to hyper-competitive individuals like yourself and others, looking for any small edge to destroy the enemy.  In this case an enemy made up of children.

 

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13 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Only to hyper-competitive individuals like yourself and others, looking for any small edge to destroy the enemy.  In this case an enemy made up of children.

Opponent,   You are over-stretching.

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19 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Only to hyper-competitive individuals like yourself and others, looking for any small edge to destroy the enemy.  In this case an enemy made up of children.

Again, not pertinent to the discussion. You made a simple claim; That the clock provided no competitive advantage. I countered it; nothing more. You did not define in any detail what competitive advantage was. So, even if it is miniscule, or even not necessary to some, the fact is there is an advantage to having one.

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Just now, Irishman said:

Again, not pertinent to the discussion. You made a simple claim; I countered it; nothing more.

Yes it is pertinent because it only seems to matter to certain individuals.   I posit that the supposed "edge" you put forth is minimal, especially in a form of the game played by children.

Do you have statistics proving that this "edge" has won or lost a significant amount of high football games over say, the last decade?

 

 

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11 minutes ago, WCGrad92 said:

Opponent,   You are over-stretching.

Football is a game based on warfare.  Your opponent is the enemy, for the duration of the contest. With the hierarchy of command, boot camp-style practices, playbooks, strategy and violence, football is more warlike than any other popular sport.  At its core the game of football is based around either the taking or giving up of territory, just like classic warfare.

 

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Just now, Muda69 said:

Football is a game based on warfare.  Your opponent is the enemy, for the duration of the contest. With the hierarchy of command, boot camp-style practices, playbooks, strategy and violence, football is more warlike than any other popular sport.  At its core the game of football is based around either the taking or giving up of territory, just like classic warfare.

Muda, you know absolutely nothing about WARFARE. Please stop comparing the GAME of football to WAR. Laughable at best.

 

WCGrad92

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1 minute ago, WCGrad92 said:

Muda, you know absolutely nothing about WARFARE. Please stop comparing the GAME of football to WAR. 

How does one get to know something about WARFARE?  

Sorry, I won't.

 

1 minute ago, NLCTigerFan07 said:

@Muda69 Does it ever get tiring finding something to argue in every every thread? I honestly can't imagine putting that much effort to do so. Truly mind boggling.

Every thread?  I don't think so.

 

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2 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Sorry, I won't.

So you are saying you do know what WAR is like?  I highly doubt it,  you dont strike me as the type of person who would actually sign a dotted line to sacrifice your own life for country. I have a feeling if you did, you would still be the first person running to the back.

On this topic you truly have no clue what you are talking about when comparing a GAME to something far worse.

Have a wonderful day Sir.  Your sore attitude could use it.

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I’d like to talk a little bit about Baseball and Football. Starting with Baseball; Baseball is different from any other sport in a lot of different little ways. For instance, in most sports, you score points or you score goals. In Baseball, you score runs.

In most sports, the ball or the object is put in play by the offensive team. In Baseball, the defense puts the ball in play, and only the defensive team is allowed to touch the ball. In fact in Baseball, if an offensive player touches the ball intentionally, he’s out. Also, most sports, the team is run by a coach. In Baseball, the team is run by a manager. And only in Baseball, does the manager or the coach, have to wear the same uniform the players do. Can you picture Bill Parcells in his New York Giants uniform?

Now Baseball and Football are different from one another in other kind of interesting ways I think. First of all, Baseball is a 19th century pastoral game. Football is a 20th century technological struggle. Baseball is played on a diamond in the park, the Baseball Park. Football is played on a gridiron in a stadium, sometimes called Soldier Field or War Memorial Stadium.

Baseball begins in the spring, the season of new life. Football begins in the fall, when everything is dying. In Football, you wear a helmet. In Baseball, you wear a cap. Football is concerned with downs. What down is it? Baseball is concerned with ups. Who’s up? Are you up? I’m not up. He is up. In Football, the specialist comes in to kick. In Baseball, the specialist comes in to relieve someone. In Football, you receive a penalty. In Baseball, you make an error. Whoops!

Football has hitting, clipping, spearing, blocking, piling on, late hitting, unnecessary roughness and personal fouls. Baseball has the sacrifice. Football is played in any kind of weather, rain, sleet, snow, hail, mud, can’t read the numbers on the field, can’t read the yard markers, can’t read the players numbers, the struggle will continue.

In Baseball, if it rains, we don’t come out to play. “I can’t come out to play. It’s raining out.” Baseball has a 7th inning stretch. Football has the two minute warning. Baseball has no time limit. We don’t know when it’s gonna end. We might have extra innings.

Football is rigidly timed and it will end even if we have to go to sudden death. In Baseball, during the game in the stands, there is kind of a picnic feeling. Emotions may run high or low, but there’s not that much unpleasantness. In Football, in the stands, during the game you can be sure that at least 27 times you are perfectly capable of taking the life of a fellow human being, preferably a stranger.

And finally the objectives of the two games are totally different. In Football, the object is for the quarterback, otherwise known as the field general, to be on target with his aerial assault riddling the defense by hitting his receivers with deadly accuracy in spite of the blitz even if he has to use the shotgun. With short bullet passes and long bombs, he marches his troops into enemy territory, balancing his aerial assault with a sustained ground attack, which punches holes in the forward wall of the enemies’ defensive line. In Baseball, the object is to go home, and to be safe. I hope I’ll be safe at home, safe at home.   - George Carlin

2 minutes ago, WCGrad92 said:

So you are saying you do know what WAR is like?  I highly doubt it,  you dont strike me as the type of person who would actually sign a dotted line to sacrifice your own life for country. I have a feeling if you did, you would still be the first person running to the back.

On this topic you truly have no clue what you are talking about when comparing a GAME to something far worse.

Have a wonderful day Sir.  Your sore attitude could use it.

From a personal experience level, no I do not know what WAR is like.  Doesn't make my opinion on this topic any less valid. Are you a military veteran WCGrad92?

 

 

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1 minute ago, WCGrad92 said:

I am

I thought so. Thank you for your service.

 

 

https://www.seeker.com/football-shaped-by-military-discovery-news-1765639631.html

Quote

The military played a major role in turning football from an elite college sport into an American pastime.

The military both popularized football and developed rules to make it safer.

During World War II, West Point's football team recruited athletes with the understanding that they could escape the draft.

War-speak pervades football, and military institutions use high school and college games as recruiting opportunities.

You might want to pause during this year's Super Bowl half-time show to give a nod to the military, which is closer to your Sunday night viewing experience than you probably realize.

The armed forces, according to recent research, played a major role in turning football from an elitist college sport into an American pastime.

In the early 20th century, military institutions also helped popularize and develop regulations for the sport. And today, military influences linger in the language used to describe football strategy. As you watch, listen for phrases like "trench warfare" and "field generals." Even terms like "sacking" and "blitzing" have roots in war-speak.

"The study of the history of college football has frequently been focused on particular players and coaches and not on the country's interest in the game as a whole," said Paul Vasquez, a social scientist at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. "A lot of people don't realize how it has become the phenomenon it has, and how the military's role played a part in that story."

In its infancy, football was a violent sport that was played only at elite Northeastern colleges. After the first official college game, between Yale and Harvard in 1869, football began to spread westward and southward.

Football first met the armed forces in 1882, Vasquez reported in the journal Armed Forces & Society. That year, the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., adopted the sport as an important part of a military education. the United States Military Academy at West Point followed in 1890. Both institutions used football to keep cadets fit in and prepare them for the strategies of warfare.

The game proved popular. By 1892, according to Vasquez' research, football was played on at least 19 army bases across the country.

In those early years, military teams often played against college teams, and that occasionally caused problems. In 1894, for example, two separate games were scheduled to be played on Thanksgiving Day in Indiana, even though the tradition was for just the state's top two teams to play that day.

The president of Purdue University, which was slated for a Thanksgiving game against Depaw University, grew upset when he heard of Butler's scheduled game with the Indianapolis Light Artillery. So, he began sending letters to other college presidents expressing a number of complaints.

Among them, he suggested that maybe college teams should stop playing military teams -- not just because simultaneous games threatened ticket sales, but also because soldiers tended to be bigger, stronger and older than college students. He worried about both the safety of his players and the purity of the college game.

The group that met to address those concerns ended up forming the first collegiate athletic conference, now know as the "Big 10." The NCAA, likewise, emerged from concerns that the game was too violent and caused too many serious injuries and deaths. Captain Palmer Pierce, the coach of the West Point team, became the president of that institution, originally called the Inter Collegiate Athletic Association, which put regulations in place to make the game less brutal and bloody.

Major wars were important turning points in the popularization of the game. During World War I, football turned out to be a great diversion for soldiers, keeping them out of trouble during down times and helping build teamwork. With more men mobilized on military camps and bases, the number of people playing football rose. At the same time, a growing number of civilians gained exposure to football as they visited bases to watch games, and that helped create a national taste for the sport.

"The most striking thing to me was how, in World War I, the military helped democratize football," said Patricia Shields, a political scientist at Texas State University in San Marcos. "Back in the 1800s, there was a big division in class between people who went to college and people who didn't, and people who didn't go to college didn't necessarily care about college sports."

"As common people throughout the country began to understand the game -- and it's not that easy to understand, but you understand it by playing and enjoying it -- that made it more interesting," she added. "Who knows, maybe football wouldn't be what it is today without the military."

...

 

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5 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Doesn't make my opinion on this topic any less valid

Well, i guess i cannot tell you that your opinion is wrong, since it is YOUR opinion. I can just disagree with your opinion.  

Hopefully for your own sake, you never see or know what WAR is,  YOUR opinion might actually change.

 

Again, Have a Great Day!!

2 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Thank you for your service.

Thank you for saying that, and You are most definitely welcome

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3 minutes ago, WCGrad92 said:

Hopefully for your own sake, you never see or know what WAR is,  YOUR opinion might actually change.

I hope I don't either.  However you cannot deny the general nomenclature of American tackle football is steeped in military jargon and themes.

 

1 minute ago, Coach Nowlin said:

I do love some George Carlin, however, he is an entertainer 

 

What is fundamentally untrue about this statement by Mr. Carlin?:

Quote

In Football, the object is for the quarterback, otherwise known as the field general, to be on target with his aerial assault riddling the defense by hitting his receivers with deadly accuracy in spite of the blitz even if he has to use the shotgun. With short bullet passes and long bombs, he marches his troops into enemy territory, balancing his aerial assault with a sustained ground attack, which punches holes in the forward wall of the enemies’ defensive line

 

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Carlin was great at figurative language such as:

Hyperbole 

that is what makes it entertaining

 

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1 hour ago, Coach Nowlin said:

Schools in the nation that do not have them will have a worn out Back Judge !!!   Get those arm exercises in!!

yikes.....🤐

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1 hour ago, Coach Nowlin said:

Carlin was great at figurative language such as:

Hyperbole 

that is what makes it entertaining

 

I can hear the late John Facenda, voice of NFL Films, saying pretty much the same thing.......................

 

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I think your point is moot Muda, at least in Indiana. It has been years since I've been to a HS that didn't have play clocks. 

I'm down though, in those blowout games you whine about, I'm all for removing all play clocks as well as game clocks, we'll keep it on the field, NO PROBLEM!

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