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The Coronavirus - a virus from eating bats, an accident or something sinister gone wrong?

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Mnuchin Warns of ‘Permanent Damage’ to Economy if Shutdowns Are Extended

https://www.nationalreview.com/news/mnuchin-warns-of-permanent-damage-to-economy-if-shutdowns-are-extended/

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Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on Tuesday warned that continued lockdowns meant to slow the spread of coronavirus could scar the U.S. economy.

“There is the risk of permanent damage” if the economy stays shut, Mnuchin told lawmakers at a hearing of the Senate Banking Committee. “We’re conscious of the health issues and we want to do this in a safe way.”

Mnuchin was joined by Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell to answer lawmakers’ questions on the use of funds provided in economic relief legislation passed in March and April. Both officials have warned that the U.S. economy faces a challenging period ahead.

“I think the jobs numbers will be worse before they get better,” Mnuchin said. Job losses already total upwards of 36 million, or about 20 percent of the workforce, with an unemployment rate of about 14 percent.

“This is the biggest shock we’ve seen in living memory,” Powell told the senators. Powell suggested that the federal government may need to increase economic aid even further if local governments are unable to balance their budgets: “We have the evidence of the global financial crisis and the years afterward, where state and local government layoffs and lack of hiring did weigh on economic growth.”

Congress and President Trump have already signed off on economic relief packages approaching $3 trillion. Democrats and some Republicans, notably Missouri senator Josh Hawley, have pushed for additional federal aid to Americans laid off from work during the coronavirus pandemic.

However, Senate Republican leadership has cautioned against additional measures until more data can be gathered on the effectiveness of previous legislation.

“We need to assess what we’ve already done, take a look at what worked and what didn’t work, and we’ll discuss the way forward in the next couple of weeks,” Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) told reporters on Tuesday.

 

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Posted (edited)

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Edited by Muda69
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Hoover Institution predicts 125M deaths from starvation as a result of coronavirus economic shut downs.

 

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A completely on point breakdown of the entire situation:

 

The New York Times Recoils at the Predictable Consequences of the Mandatory COVID-19 Precautions It Supports

https://reason.com/2020/05/20/the-new-york-times-recoils-at-the-predictable-consequences-of-the-mandatory-covid-19-precautions-it-supports/

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"Of the 125 people arrested over offenses that law enforcement officials described as related to the coronavirus pandemic, 113 were black or Hispanic. Of the 374 summonses from March 16 to May 5, a vast majority—300—were given to black and Hispanic New Yorkers."

So begins a New York Times editorial that recoils at the predictable consequences of a policy that The New York Times supports. When the government orders people, under the threat of hefty fines, to stop working, stay home except for approved purposes, wear face masks in public, avoid "non-essential gatherings of individuals of any size for any reason," and keep their distance from each other, it charges police with enforcing those edicts. The resulting encounters may lead to criminal charges such as disorderly conduct, unlawful assembly, and obstructing governmental administration. Given the long record of racially skewed law enforcement by the New York Police Department (NYPD), it is not at all surprising that the people who bear the brunt of mandatory social distancing are overwhelmingly black and Latino.

 

The Times does not like that result:

Videos of some of the arrests are hard to watch. In one posted to Facebook last week, a group of some six police officers are seen tackling a black woman in a subway station as her young child looks on. "She's got a baby with her!" a bystander shouts. Police officials told The Daily News the woman had refused to comply when officers directed her to put the mask she was wearing over her nose and mouth.

Contrast that with photographs across social media showing crowds of sun-seekers packed into parks in wealthy, whiter areas of the city, lounging undisturbed as police officers hand out masks….

Without a significant course correction, the [police] department's role in the pandemic may look more and more like stop-and-frisk, the policing tactic that led to the harassment of hundreds of thousands of innocent people, most of them black and Hispanic, while rarely touching white New Yorkers. [Mayor Bill] de Blasio has scoffed at the comparison, though it's not clear why.

The "course correction" suggested by the Times—a "public health corps" consisting of "specially trained civilians" who would "fan out across the neighborhoods and parks, helping with pedestrian traffic control and politely encouraging New Yorkers entering parks to protect one another by wearing masks and keeping their distance"—presents problems of its own. While those specially trained civilians presumably would be less likely than police officers to tackle, beat, and tase people for perceived violations of COVID-19 precautions, the potential for violence would still exist.

What would a member of this public health corps do if a parkgoer says he intends to keep his distance from other people but is not willing to wear a mask, since he (correctly) views the risk of virus transmission in an uncrowded, open-air environment as negligible? (Fun fact: In New York, a masked person who "congregates" in a public place with "other persons so masked" is guilty of loitering, a violation punishable by up to 15 days in jail.)

The Times says "the Police Department would play only a minimal role in this approach." But if cops serve as a backstop in responding to recalcitrant pedestrians, we are back to a situation in which social distancing rules are enforced by blatantly violating them through the physical contact and close proximity required to arrest, book, and jail people (which puts them in an environment where the risk of catching COVID-19 is especially high).

We also have to allow for the possibility that disputes between social distancing encouragers (who may not be as polite as they are supposed to be) and uncooperative targets (some of whom will be indignant and perhaps belligerent) will escalate into physical altercations. That danger is by no means theoretical.

The Times cannot have it both ways. If COVID-19 precautions are mandatory, they must at some point be legally enforced, with all the risks that entails, including violence and racial discrimination. The public health payoff might justify those risks in certain contexts—if a dense crowd happens to gather in Central Park, for instance, or if subway riders refuse to wear masks (although that was the situation in the video that the Times cites as evidence of overkill). But the risks cannot be eliminated if voluntary compliance is less than perfect, as it always will be.

Police officers charged with enforcing mask-wearing and social distancing requirements have to constantly weigh the costs of forcible intervention against the likely benefits. As the Times notes, it is not a task they welcome. "This situation is untenable," says Patrick Lynch, president of the New York City Police Benevolent Association. "The NYPD needs to get cops out of the social distancing enforcement business altogether."

But that effectively means mandates will become recommendations. And while most people probably will follow those recommendations, out of concern for their own welfare if not out of consideration for others, some won't. The Times can't will away that tradeoff by pretending it does not exist.

 

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So Indiana is now moving to phase 3.  On Friday.  It should have been Friday all along - originally it was this coming Monday......Memorial Day......So Campgrounds were planning on being closed during a weekend where many of them make 50% of their annual revenue.......Today many campground owners are literally buried in phone calls from people RE-reserving sites they had to cancel......and scrambling to ready the parks fro a huge opener.......SF is glad the Governor pulled the trigger for this weekend, but, Again - Should have been Friday all along......

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https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/494301-elizabeth-warrens-oldest-brother-dies-of-covid-19-in-oklahoma

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) eldest brother, Donald Reed Herring, has died from complications related to the novel coronavirus, the senator confirmed. He was 86.

“My oldest brother, Don Reed, died from coronavirus on Tuesday evening,” Warren said in a tweet on Thursday morning. “He joined the Air Force at 19 and spent his career in the military, including five and a half years off and on in combat in Vietnam.”

“He was charming and funny, a natural leader,” she added.

 

Warren told The Boston Globe, which was first to report the news on Thursday morning, that she is “grateful to the nurses and other front-line staff who took care of my brother, but it is hard to know that there was no family to hold his hand or to say ‘I love you’ one more time.”

“And now there’s no funeral for those of us who loved him to hold each other close,” she added. “I will miss my brother.”

According to the newspaper, Herring’s death came three weeks after he first tested positive for the virus that has killed more than 45,000 people in the U.S., the latest John Hopkins University data show.

During his time in the Air Force, Herring reportedly carried out hundreds of combat missions, served as a B-52 squadron pilot and later lieutenant colonel until he retired from his decades-long military career.

He was one of Warren’s three older brothers, each of whom served in the military. All three were featured in a campaign ad earlier this year before Warren dropped out.

In the ad, her brothers, only one of which is a Democrat, discussed how even though they differ with their sister on certain policy issues, the siblings were still united in their common values: “fighting for their families and their communities."

According to The Boston Globe, Herring’s family said he was admitted to a hospital in February after contracting pneumonia. His family said that years ago he had a battle with cancer.

The family told the newspaper that he had been recovering from his fight with pneumonia at a facility before contracting the coronavirus. They said he died days after being placed in intensive care.

 

Not to make a person's death anything less, but .......He had battled cancer for years and was recovering from pneumonia when he contracted this and 86 years old.....

 IMG_2902.jpeg?w=720&ssl=1&fbclid=IwAR3JjlmJWQaoiJMj1g3O_D7-e8wKAtXA92XMGzoozxH2YIFP8f9BsxEn5a8

 

 

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Democrats are politicizing the coronavirus. That is their new hoax. - Donald Trump

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8 minutes ago, Howe said:

Amy Klobuchar admits her husband took Hydroxychloroquine when he was diagnosed with the coronavirus. Klobuchar mocked President Trump for taking Hydroxychloroquine.

 

https://www.siriusxm.com/clips/clip/a9914a41-78d6-4402-8150-b8f14a44945b/901557a6-04a5-4cd7-ae3a-5b14482c68fa

Why is Trump taking a preventative drug if it’s a hoax?

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Why Those COVID-19 Models Aren't Real Science

https://mises.org/wire/why-those-covid-19-models-arent-real-science

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Since the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, Americans have been told countless times that public policy was based on Science (with a capital S) and that the public should just obey the scientists.

But the accuracy of their predictions and the consequent appropriateness of policies seems to have been little better than Ask Dr. Science and the 0 percent accuracy rate of its answers.

In fact, the massive errors in measurement that have been part and parcel of the scientific COVID Kops show should bring us back to what Lord Kelvin said about science and measurement: “If you cannot measure it, then it is not science” and “your theory is apt to be based more upon imagination than upon knowledge.”

To get an idea of how serious the COVID measurement problems are, one need only look to the two medical experts most commonly appearing on our TV screens. Dr. Anthony Fauci recently testified his belief that its death toll is “almost certainly higher” than reported, because “there may have been people who died at home who did have COVID, who were not counted as COVID because they never really got to the hospital.” In contrast, the Washington Post recently reported that Deborah Birx believes that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) accounting system is double counting some cases, boosting case and mortality measurements “by as much as 25 percent.” And what could be a clearer statement of the measurement problems than Birx’s assertion that “there is nothing from the CDC that I can trust”?

The mangled measurements have been with us from the beginning of the COVID crisis.

Mild cases were (and still are) frequently undetected. That means that we have undercounted how many people have (or have had) the disease. It also means that we have overestimated the risk of contagion, which is perhaps the most crucial determinant of COVID’s risk to others.

Early on, there were a very limited number of tests and many of the first ones were faulty. So, as increasing numbers are being tested, especially systematically, rather than just targeting those who are already suspected of having COVID, we must disentangle the portion of the uptick of reported cases, and the implied downward adjustment of the odds of death and the risk of spread, caused by testing more of the population to determine whether there is an increasing incidence of the disease. When tests for COVID antibodies started to be done, it also suggested that more had already been exposed, changing the critical numbers again. And then there are questions about herd immunity, including whether sheltering at home actually undermines its development. Similarly, the constantly updated numbers of COVID cases in particular areas overstated the risk to others, since those who have gotten better and are not a potential source of contagion are still included in those counts.

This continuing evolution of what Science tells us reveals that what we are being told at any given time is highly likely to be revised, if not reversed, soon, and perhaps repeatedly. That should make us leery of all claims, including forecasts, premised on the truth of current Science. And if that weren’t bad enough, even the accuracy of the basic data has been compromised.

In some places, reported COVID deaths have included everyone who has it when they die, overstating (to a degree that we can’t know without more detailed information than we now have, and may ever have, for many cases) COVID risks. The director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, illustrated the problem when she said, “if you were in hospice and had already been given a few weeks to live, and then you also were found to have COVID, that would be counted as a COVID death….[E]ven if you died of clear alternative cause, but you had COVID at the same time, it’s still listed as a COVID death.” Further, the miscounting is often not due to judgments about shades of gray. For instance, Colorado counted a man who died of acute alcohol poisoning (his blood alcohol content (BAC) was 0.55, when 0.30 is considered lethal) as a COVID death. And when the state recounted to include only deaths caused by COVID, its total fell from 1,150 to only 878.

New York has also counted as COVID deaths cases involving flulike symptoms, even when postmortem COVID tests have been negative. CDC guidance explicitly advises that “suspected” cases, even in the absence of test evidence, can be reported as COVID deaths. That is why the New York Times could report that on April 21 the city death toll was augmented by “3,700 additional people who were presumed to have died of the coronavirus but had never tested positive.”

Then there is also lots of evidence that bears on appropriate COVID policy. For instance, Charles Murray has demonstrated that “The relationship of population density to the spread of the coronavirus creates sets of policy options that are radically different in high-density and low-density areas,” so that “too many people in high places, in government and the media, have been acting as if there is a right and moral policy toward the pandemic that applies throughout America. That’s wrong.”

Randal O’Toole has also cited studies finding that “mass transportation systems offer an effective way of accelerating the spread of infectious diseases,” that “people who use mass transit were nearly six times more likely to have acute respiratory infections than those who don’t,” that New York City subways were “a major disseminator—if not the principal transmission vehicle—of coronavirus infection,” and that there is “a strong state‐by‐state correlation between transit and coronavirus,” to ask why mass transit systems were not shuttered to stop the harm. Elsewhere, he noted that “The head of New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority was infected by the virus and the head of New Jersey Transit actually died from it.”

All this evidence reveals that the COVID Science and conclusions Americans were supposed to follow unquestioningly have been incredibly incomplete or wrong, with the stability of quicksand. Such Science is too frail a reed to depend on in making policies with multitrillion dollar price tags. What it does support is much more humility, reflecting Kelvin’s recognition that:

When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely, in your thoughts advanced to the stage of science.

 

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Had this in the meme thread, but after that post from Muda, SF thinks it applies here......

Image may contain: text that says 'BREAKING: 66 people died in Chicago yesterday from COVID-1 -19-related gunshot wounds- but they will be voting by mail!'

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1 hour ago, swordfish said:

 

Hilarious.

 

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Doctors in Northern California say they have seen more deaths from suicide than they’ve seen from the coronavirus during the pandemic.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/california-doctors-say-theyve-seen-more-deaths-from-suicide-than-coronavirus-since-lockdowns

“The numbers are unprecedented,” Dr. Michael deBoisblanc of John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, California, told ABC 7 News about the increase of deaths by suicide, adding that he’s seen a “year’s worth of suicides” in the last four weeks alone.

DeBoisblanc said he believes it’s time for California officials to end the stay-at-home order and let people back out into their communities.

"Personally, I think it's time," he said. "I think, originally, this was put in place to flatten the curve and to make sure hospitals have the resources to take care of COVID patients. We have the current resources to do that, and our other community health is suffering."

Kacey Hansen, a trauma center nurse at John Muir Medical Center for more than 30 years, says she’s worried not only about the increased suicide attempts but also about the hospital’s ability to save as many patients as usual.

"What I have seen recently, I have never seen before," Hansen said. "I have never seen so much intentional injury."

Businesses across California have started defying stay-at-home orders imposed by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, and hundreds of protesters have hit the streets, making the argument that the orders were only meant to flatten the curve of the virus’s spread, which Newsom himself said was achieved in mid-April.

Suicide has been an increasingly significant problem across the country as the coronavirus outbreak caused stay-at-home orders that led to unemployment and stress.

By late March, more people had died in just one Tennessee county from suicide than had died in the entire state directly from the virus.

A study published in early May suggested that the coronavirus could lead to at least 75,000 deaths directly brought on by anxiety from the virus, job losses, and addiction to alcohol and drugs.

Another study conducted by Just Facts around the same time computed a broad array of scientific data showing that stress is one of the deadliest health hazards in the world and estimated that the coronavirus lockdowns will destroy 7 times as many years of human life than strict lockdowns can save.

Earlier this week, more than 600 doctors signed their names on a letter to President Trump, referring to the continued lockdowns as a “mass casualty incident” and urging him to do what he can to ensure they come to an end.

 

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5 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

The haircuts, or the flag desecration?

As if....

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Posted (edited)

I just recieved the following text from my sister who is an elementary teacher in suburban Los Angeles.                          

  “As the momentum to open up the country grows and grows, the Libtards are literally writhing in despair! It's like throwing Holy Water on a possessed person. They scream louder as each lockdown restriction is lifted! I absolutely love it!”

Edited by Howe
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2 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

HVAC-Talk: Heating, Air & Refrigeration Discussion

The perfect term to describe those who suffer from Trump Derangement Syndrome.

I have a bunch of siblings and we are all pretty successful in our careers. We all use the term to describe lunatics.

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Howe said:

The perfect term to describe those who suffer from Trump Derangement Syndrome.

I have a bunch of siblings and we are all pretty successful in our careers. We all use the term to describe lunatics.

What does Trump Derangement Syndrome have to do with States deciding to reopen? Trump isn't in control of each individual State's policies regarding Covid19. A bunch of your siblings must not know how our Government works.

Edited by gonzoron
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