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Follow the Science? How COVID Authoritarians Get It Wrong


Muda69
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What Old-Time Saloons Tell Us About the Pandemic's Damage

https://reason.com/2022/04/16/bars-are-full-of-good-ideas/

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Just days before the signing of the Constitution, George Washington, not yet America's first president, took his pals out for a night on the town to celebrate the Constitutional Convention's end. They went to Philadelphia's City Tavern, where, if a surviving receipt is to be believed, he and his men consumed more than 100 bottles of wine, more than 30 bottles of beer, eight bottles of whiskey, eight bottles of cider, and seven bowls of punch, for an inflation-adjusted tab of somewhere between $15,000 and $17,000.

This was a big celebration, but it wasn't entirely out of the ordinary. The Founders were drinkers and distillers. Washington produced his own brandy and whiskey at Mount Vernon, and he and his fellow revolutionaries imbibed vast quantities of spirits as they plotted independence and developed the machinery of American governance. Saloons were so heavily associated with revolutionary ideas, in fact, that they became known as "nurseries of freedom."

Saloons were where the ideas that would define America were first hashed out, presumably via the kind of rowdy, unstructured conversation that tends to happen in bars. It is not much of an exaggeration to say that America was imagined, organized, and eventually built over booze consumed in saloons. Without saloons, America—or at least America as we know it—might not exist.

In the century and a half after the founding, saloons continued to be a key social institution, places of business, leisure, and community for many men—until Prohibition wiped them out, destroying in one fell stroke the cultural and economic infrastructure they had long provided.

COVID-19 was the greatest disruption to America's bar scene since Prohibition. Some 110,000 eating and drinking establishments, affecting an estimated 2.5 million jobs, closed either temporarily or permanently during the pandemic, according to the National Restaurant Association. This too represented a great cultural and economic loss.

It wasn't just the bars that went away, and with them the jobs and economic activity directly associated with the business of slinging drinks. There was a dramatic reduction in the casual conversations and fateful meetings these bars hosted, and the potentially valuable ideas those interactions could have generated.

This sort of thing is hard to quantify. How much is any given bar conversation worth? In most cases, probably not all that much. A better question is: How much are all of them worth, in aggregate? That is possible to measure—not by looking at today's pandemic-adjacent bar closures but by looking back to the closest analogue, Prohibition, and the decline in innovation that attended the shuttering of America's saloons.

The cost to innovation was just one of many associated with Prohibition, and it took nearly a century, and some unusually clever data gathering, to pin it down. That in turn provides a strong hint that the costs and consequences of the current pandemic are broader and deeper than we can currently measure or see. They may well take years to fully discover. To begin to understand them, we first have to understand America's long love affair with saloons.

...

The central idea of the saloon was that it was a productive social space—a hangout and a refuge, but also, in the days before Prohibition, a bank and a place to make deals, find work, and organize political campaigns. Yes, there were table games and drinks, but there were also informal or semiformal social functions: Saloonkeepers cashed checks and made loans, and many saloons catered to particular occupations.

As the historian Jon M. Kingsdale noted in a 1973 article for the American Quarterly, "The 'Poor Man's Club': Social Functions of the Working-Class Saloon," some, like The Milkman's Exchange and The Mechanic's Exchange in Chicago, were named for the type of workers they served. Unemployed men might go there to have a drink or play a round of billiards, but they also might stop in to find work. There was no such thing as LinkedIn, so you went to the corner bar instead.

In the decades before Prohibition, saloons were also heavily associated with urban politics, especially in New York and Chicago. "Saloons fitted the needs of the machine politician perfectly," wrote Kingsdale. "Saloons could, and did, easily double as ward clubs, and the type and extent of the saloon-keeper's contact with his neighborhood was a valuable political asset."

These political machinations were sometimes associated with urban corruption, although to some extent the location was incidental. As with the American Revolution, politics happened where the people interested in politics gathered, and that frequently meant saloons.

In the decades before alcohol consumption was outlawed, bars were ubiquitous: In 1897, there were approximately 215,000 licensed saloons in the U.S., plus an estimated 50,000 unlicensed taverns, known as blind pigs or blind tigers. In Chicago alone, prior to Prohibition, the number of saloons was higher than the number of groceries, meat markets, and dry goods stores combined; the total daily attendance at the city's booze-based hangouts was equal to about half the city's population.

Saloons were everywhere, in other words. They connected communities, giving them grit and character, greasing their economies, and propping up their politics. No one planned it that way. Pre-Prohibition saloons were usually easy to open, with relatively low startup costs and few regulatory hurdles. Many opened, some failed, and some became fixtures of the neighborhood.

....

Yet its social and economic ripple effects likely persisted for decades, in terms of collaborations that never took place and ideas that were forever lost. Informal interactions are, by definition, difficult to study. It took nearly a century for a diligent researcher to suss out the data necessary to measure Prohibition's effect on patenting. But it is probable that the period's disruptions to innovation continue to shape our world. It is also reasonable to assume that there were other costs that remain hidden to us, some of which we may never understand.

And that brings us to today, and the COVID pandemic, and the myriad social upheavals it has wrought.

In March 2020, state and local authorities forcibly shuttered not just bars and restaurants but churches, schools, convention centers, theaters, concert halls, office buildings, and countless other public and private gathering places all across the country. Policies varied by location, but the vast majority of Americans were affected by the initial shutdowns. Over time, some of those restrictions were lifted, especially in states with Republican governors. But in many of the country's most populous urban centers, modified restrictions persisted into 2021. Indoor dining was prohibited or subject to strict capacity limits; movie theaters and concert venues remained closed; conferences were prohibited.

By the start of 2022, most formal restrictions on gathering were gone, but their aftereffects lingered. Many urban office buildings remain empty, in part because of citywide mask -mandates that make professional interactions difficult. The downtown corridors that office workers once populated can feel like ghost towns. Indoor dining has returned, but business is soft and unpredictable, and many establishments have simply shut down.

A January 2022 message from the Portland, Oregon, bar Clyde Common tells the tale. "The length of the Covid pandemic, along with the ongoing decline in our downtown city core, are direct reasons that Clyde is closing for good," the bar's leadership said in an Instagram post. "Indirect reasons include the extreme difficulty in finding people to work, the anemic economic support from both our local government and the federal government, and the sobering reality that it's almost impossible to make a full service restaurant and bar in a high-rent district succeed without the tourism and office worker population required." Clyde Common's bar had a national reputation for innovation; it was the birthplace of barrel-aged Negronis, which ended up on the menus of high-end cocktail joints everywhere. But its fame couldn't save it.

In 2018, Brad Thomas Parsons traveled the country to research his book Last Call: Bartenders on Their Final Drink and Wisdom (Ten Speed Press). That research included a lot of hanging out at pre-pandemic bars at last call as they wrapped up service for the night. "I knew Last Call was going to be a dark book, physically, being shot at night, but emotionally, too," he says. Yet he had no idea how dark it would eventually feel.

"Three months into 2020 every single bar in the book was now closed, and sadly, several [were closed] permanently," he explains. "I wanted nothing more than to be able to casually walk into a bar—any bar—and sit courtside and order a drink." He calls it "the classic situation" of not knowing what you have until it's gone.

Just as some bars have reopened, some in-person events have resumed. But other mass gatherings, such as the Sundance Film Festival and the E3 video game expo, once a massive hub for the industry, are planning fully online experiences for 2022. K-12 schools continue to close sporadically, and while policies differ by institution, some colleges are still imposing strict social distancing requirements on students, effectively outlawing normal out-of-class social lives.

All of which is to say that the pandemic, and the policy responses to it, have disrupted American social life in ways hardly seen since Prohibition. The effects of COVID-19 have arguably been more widespread, reaching into classrooms and churches and other community gathering centers, not just drinking establishments. Opportunities for informal interactions dwindled precipitously at the onset of the pandemic; two years later, many of those opportunities either have yet to return or have come back in altered forms. Think of the difference between a scheduled Zoom meeting and an ad hoc office happy hour: Something is lost, even if it's not precisely clear what.

"Patents," Andrews says, "almost certainly are not capturing all of creativity, much less everything else that makes life worth living." So far, he has no hard data on the toll the pandemic has taken. He hesitates to speculate too much. But he allows that "losing those interactions is going to have some consequences."

Because so many aspects of our lives have been disrupted in the last two years, we should expect consequences that go beyond a mere deficit in innovation. As with Prohibition, those consequences could prove difficult to see, or at least to measure, in real time. We don't know what we don't know. The upshot of Andrews' research is not just that reductions in informal interactions affect innovation, although they do; it's that they have effects that are both unintended and hidden from view, often for years to come.

But one of the likely consequences is already coming into view: America is in a bad mood, and people are acting out -accordingly.

Many forms of adult antisocial behavior have risen since the shutdowns began. Murder rates are up in most major cities. So are reports of abusive behavior by airline passengers, bar patrons, and restaurantgoers, partly as a result of anger around masking requirements. Car accidents have increased, even though Americans have been driving fewer miles. Psychologists and psychiatrists report dramatic upticks in mental health problems, particularly depression and anxiety. The headline on the most-read article on the New York Times website in 2021 captured the mood of the COVID era: "There's a name for the blah you're feeling: languishing."

For children, whose lives have been disrupted even more than most adults' lives thanks to school closures and quarantine requirements, the negative effects are even more acute. In October 2021, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Children's Hospital Association declared a national emergency in child and adolescent mental health. Masking requirements in schools have created communications difficulties, especially for children with learning disabilities.

Some of the strongest indicators of people's mental health and well-being are the quality and consistency of their social lives—the strength of their connections to family, friends, work, and community. The pandemic and the policy responses to it have drastically interfered with those connections.

Nearly every nonpharmaceutical intervention intended to address the pandemic prescribed some form of social disconnection. Fewer gatherings, smaller gatherings, isolation, social distancing, even masking, which can prevent easy conversation—these are all ways of keeping people apart, of reducing casual, friendly, informal social feedback and exchange. It's no wonder people are languishing.

As with Prohibition, our social connections will probably regrow over time as we adjust and adapt to a COVID-haunted world. Among the conclusions of Andrews' paper is that, "while a given social network may be fragile, people are resilient and find ways to repair or build new networks."

But policy makers have a role to play too, by prioritizing the restoration of communal connection and casual interaction. Andrews is reluctant to propose sweeping policy changes, but he says officials should be aware that "how people interact really matters, and it matters often in subtle ways that are hard to -predict."

The pandemic's toll has been as high as it has been partly because of a sense among public health experts that the costs of lockdowns, distancing, and masking requirements would be negligible. How many times did we hear that staying home for a brief time was a small price to pay for saving some number of lives, that school closures represented no threat to student psyches or learning progress, that masks were an easy, low-cost measure, really just a form of basic politeness?

These responses were predicated on the notion that informal social interactions have little or no value, and thus that disrupting them has minimal costs. That wasn't true of the connections that happened in saloons before Prohibition, and it's not true now. Two years into the pandemic, it's already clear that the costs of COVID-era disruptions have been considerable. And as with Prohibition, we may not know the true toll for many years to come.

 

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SF has done his part supporting local breweries during this pandemic (so long as they offer a dark stout - if you can see through your beer, it ain't beer IMHO).  

Glad to have many of the old local haunts opening back up that survived this plandemic........

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2 hours ago, Muda69 said:

What Old-Time Saloons Tell Us About the Pandemic's Damage

https://reason.com/2022/04/16/bars-are-full-of-good-ideas/

 

This country was built on alcohol. 
 

 

2 hours ago, swordfish said:

SF has done his part supporting local breweries during this pandemic (so long as they offer a dark stout - if you can see through your beer, it ain't beer IMHO).  

Glad to have many of the old local haunts opening back up that survived this plandemic........

For years when IO is out of his geographic home base, I always ask if they have any local brews. 
IO wonders at the science behind brewing/distilling. This past season of Moonshiners Tim Smith took a trip to several Mexican tequila and Mezcal distilleries. Fascinating generations old operations. The mix of science and art is truly amazing. 

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Don't know why I would post a story about a mysterious liver disease in children that just sprung up recently in the Covid thread.......

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-24/mystery-liver-disease-in-children-spurs-urgent-investigation  

April 24, 2022, 12:10 AM EDT
 

One child has died and more than a dozen have undergone liver transplants as a result of a mysterious outbreak of severe acute hepatitis that’s sickened children in the U.K., the U.S. and 10 other countries, the World Health Organization said.

Health authorities are trying to determine the source of the liver-inflaming disease that’s afflicted at least 169 children, ages 1 month to 16 years, as of April 21, the WHO said in a statement Saturday. Typical causes of viral hepatitis have been  excluded.

The United Nations agency was notified on April 5 of 10 cases among previously healthy children across central Scotland with jaundice, diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Three days later, 74 cases had been identified in the U.K.

As of April 21, the U.K. had 114 cases followed by 13 in Spain, 12 in Israel, nine in the U.S. and 21 more scattered among Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Italy, Norway, France, Romania and Belgium. Many were infected with a strain of adenovirus, a family of viruses that cause a range of illnesses including the common cold.

“It is not yet clear if there has been an increase in hepatitis cases, or an increase in awareness of hepatitis cases that occur at the expected rate but go undetected,” WHO said. “While adenovirus is a possible hypothesis, investigations are ongoing for the causative agent.”

Seventeen children, or about 10% of cases, have required a liver transplant and at least one death has been reported, the Geneva-based agency said. With more extensive searching, it’s “very likely that more cases will be detected before the cause can be confirmed and more specific control and prevention measures can be implemented,” it said.

Symptoms include liver inflammation, with markedly high liver enzymes, and jaundice, preceded by abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. The common viruses that cause acute viral hepatitis -- hepatitis viruses A, B, C, D and E -- haven’t been detected in any of the cases, WHO said.

International travel or links to other countries haven’t revealed any clues yet either. Toxicology and additional microbiological testing is underway in affected countries, which have also initiated enhanced surveillance activities. 

Adenovirus was detected in more than 40% of cases. Of virus samples that underwent molecular testing, 18 were identified as F type 41, WHO said. Nineteen cases were found to have a SARS-CoV-2 and adenovirus co-infection.

“Due to enhanced laboratory testing for adenovirus, this could represent the identification of an existing rare outcome occurring at levels not previously detected that is now being recognized due to increased testing,” the agency said.

More than 50 types of adenoviruses can cause infections in humans, according to the WHO. Usually a cause of self-limited communicable infections, they most commonly cause respiratory illness. Depending on the type, they can also cause other illnesses such as gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis and bladder infection. 

Adenovirus type 41, the strain implicated in the liver-disease outbreak, typically causes diarrhea, vomiting, and fever, often accompanied by respiratory symptoms. Even though adenovirus is being investigated as a possible cause of the outbreak, it doesn’t fully explain the severity of the symptoms, WHO said.

“While there have been case reports of hepatitis in immunocompromised children with adenovirus infection, adenovirus type 41 is not known to be a cause of hepatitis in otherwise healthy children,” it said.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, swordfish said:

Don't know why I would post a story about a mysterious liver disease in children that just sprung up recently in the Covid thread.......

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-24/mystery-liver-disease-in-children-spurs-urgent-investigation  

 
April 24, 2022, 12:10 AM EDT
 

One child has died and more than a dozen have undergone liver transplants as a result of a mysterious outbreak of severe acute hepatitis that’s sickened children in the U.K., the U.S. and 10 other countries, the World Health Organization said.

Health authorities are trying to determine the source of the liver-inflaming disease that’s afflicted at least 169 children, ages 1 month to 16 years, as of April 21, the WHO said in a statement Saturday. Typical causes of viral hepatitis have been  excluded.

The United Nations agency was notified on April 5 of 10 cases among previously healthy children across central Scotland with jaundice, diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Three days later, 74 cases had been identified in the U.K.

As of April 21, the U.K. had 114 cases followed by 13 in Spain, 12 in Israel, nine in the U.S. and 21 more scattered among Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Italy, Norway, France, Romania and Belgium. Many were infected with a strain of adenovirus, a family of viruses that cause a range of illnesses including the common cold.

“It is not yet clear if there has been an increase in hepatitis cases, or an increase in awareness of hepatitis cases that occur at the expected rate but go undetected,” WHO said. “While adenovirus is a possible hypothesis, investigations are ongoing for the causative agent.”

Seventeen children, or about 10% of cases, have required a liver transplant and at least one death has been reported, the Geneva-based agency said. With more extensive searching, it’s “very likely that more cases will be detected before the cause can be confirmed and more specific control and prevention measures can be implemented,” it said.

Symptoms include liver inflammation, with markedly high liver enzymes, and jaundice, preceded by abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. The common viruses that cause acute viral hepatitis -- hepatitis viruses A, B, C, D and E -- haven’t been detected in any of the cases, WHO said.

International travel or links to other countries haven’t revealed any clues yet either. Toxicology and additional microbiological testing is underway in affected countries, which have also initiated enhanced surveillance activities. 

Adenovirus was detected in more than 40% of cases. Of virus samples that underwent molecular testing, 18 were identified as F type 41, WHO said. Nineteen cases were found to have a SARS-CoV-2 and adenovirus co-infection.

“Due to enhanced laboratory testing for adenovirus, this could represent the identification of an existing rare outcome occurring at levels not previously detected that is now being recognized due to increased testing,” the agency said.

More than 50 types of adenoviruses can cause infections in humans, according to the WHO. Usually a cause of self-limited communicable infections, they most commonly cause respiratory illness. Depending on the type, they can also cause other illnesses such as gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis and bladder infection. 

Adenovirus type 41, the strain implicated in the liver-disease outbreak, typically causes diarrhea, vomiting, and fever, often accompanied by respiratory symptoms. Even though adenovirus is being investigated as a possible cause of the outbreak, it doesn’t fully explain the severity of the symptoms, WHO said.

“While there have been case reports of hepatitis in immunocompromised children with adenovirus infection, adenovirus type 41 is not known to be a cause of hepatitis in otherwise healthy children,” it said.

 

 

yeah, but for the past 2 years, we were told not to post these types of things here.  Hell.  I even got a suspension.

and one of those people like to spout off on how intellectually superior they think they are.

notice those people are all REAL quiet.  They will give us some bull sh** excuse, but that fact remains, they were wrong and we were correct and silenced.

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Imagine that an entire story about this liver disease in both Bloomberg and the New York Times never once mentions or references this case report titled "A Case of Hepatotoxicity After Receiving a COVID-19 Vaccine." easily accessible using a quick google search.....Hmmmmm.  Seems like someone doesn't really want the truth to get out maybe.....

https://www.cureus.com/articles/80149-a-case-of-hepatotoxicity-after-receiving-a-covid-19-vaccine

Conclusions

This is a case of hepatotoxicity in a 14-year-old patient that occurred after receiving the second dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. The exhaustive clinical and laboratory evaluation failed to establish any other plausible etiology besides the vaccine. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness of this uncommon but potentially life-threatening side effect.

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3 hours ago, DE said:

yeah, but for the past 2 years, we were told not to post these types of things here.  Hell.  I even got a suspension.

and one of those people like to spout off on how intellectually superior they think they are.

notice those people are all REAL quiet.  They will give us some bull sh** excuse, but that fact remains, they were wrong and we were correct and silenced.

Liar
Post HERE all you want. You have never had a post deleted in this forum.....where these posts belong. You were told to keep it off the main football forum. You refused to do that.... and posted multiple times. It had absolutely NOTHING to do with the facts you posted. It was COMPLETELY about where they were posted. I have said the exact same thing God knows how many times. I am not sure why you cannot comprehend it. 

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14 minutes ago, Irishman said:

Liar
Post HERE all you want. You have never had a post deleted in this forum.....where these posts belong. You were told to keep it off the main football forum. You refused to do that.... and posted multiple times. It had absolutely NOTHING to do with the facts you posted. It was COMPLETELY about where they were posted. I have said the exact same thing God knows how many times. I am not sure why you cannot comprehend it. 

No dude, you are the liar.  It had to do w/ covid and school FOOTBALL.  How dare I say that some schools handled covid better than others?

Stop letting this "power" get to your head.

And yes, I tried to block you, but your little algorithm you have set, won't allow me.

 

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1 minute ago, DE said:

No dude, you are the liar.  It had to do w/ covid and school FOOTBALL.  How dare I say that some schools handled covid better than others?

Stop letting this "power" get to your head.

And yes, I tried to block you, but your little algorithm you have set, won't allow me.

 

Nope; you are still the liar here.......you were asked to stick to JUST the football. Regardless of feelings about how schools handled it; it was something we were dealing with. You could not do that. Posting just covid stats resulted in multiple back and forth replies among people who were not going to agree that bogged down every single new topic started; so we asked to keep it off the main page and stick to cancellations and rescheduled games; period. That was not the type of thing people wanted to see here. They get it on every other social media platform. 
 

Not a power thing at all; but keep telling yourself that.

You mean block like you had ron blocked? lol 

The block thing will work just fine; if you give up the martyr BS that you keep posting on here. Blame me for some BS on your part, and I will respond. Stop doing it, and I don't respond; it's that simple. 

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4 minutes ago, Irishman said:

Nope; you are still the liar here.......you were asked to stick to JUST the football. Regardless of feelings about how schools handled it; it was something we were dealing with. You could not do that. Posting just covid stats resulted in multiple back and forth replies among people who were not going to agree that bogged down every single new topic started; so we asked to keep it off the main page and stick to cancellations and rescheduled games; period. That was not the type of thing people wanted to see here. They get it on every other social media platform. 
 

Not a power thing at all; but keep telling yourself that.

You mean block like you had ron blocked? lol 

The block thing will work just fine; if you give up the martyr BS that you keep posting on here. Blame me for some BS on your part, and I will respond. Stop doing it, and I don't respond; it's that simple. 

Spin it however you want.  JUST football.  Dude, just STFU (yes I said it NOW) with this crap.  You literally allowed it all over.  You just didn't like the facts that went against your ways.  Weak ass.

No martyr here.  Proving what a hypocritical liar you are, yes.

 

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31 minutes ago, DE said:

Spin it however you want.  JUST football.  Dude, just STFU (yes I said it NOW) with this crap.  You literally allowed it all over.  You just didn't like the facts that went against your ways.  Weak ass.

No martyr here.  Proving what a hypocritical liar you are, yes.

 

You will actually not find any place where I disputed the facts you posted about covid. I also deleted the responses to your posts; yet you continually act like you are some sort of victim. I did not allow anything near what you think I did. And if I did; prove it. Those posts would still be visible. Not a single other person has spent so much time with their panties in a wad about their posts being deleted as you have. In fact; you are the ONLY one who has whined. Add to it you have not had one single post deleted from here about covid or anything related to it.

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kamala tests positive for the covie yet is fully vaxxed and boosted.

thought the vaccines were supposed to work?

😂

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Published in July of 2021 from the NIH - Why is the WHO and the CDC still claiming this liver injury is a "Mystery"?  THIS IS A SIDE EFFECT to the Phizer Covid vaccine in someone with comorbidities - Pure and simple.  It's not that difficult to understand.

FTA - 

Conclusions

In summary, we presented a case of liver injury after the COVID-19 vaccine. We attributed the cause of liver injury to the COVID-19 vaccine, given no other cause in our patient after extensive work-up. There are reports of drug-induced liver injury and abnormal liver function analysis from the spontaneous reports from patients who received Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in the UK. The purpose of this manuscript is to raise awareness of potential side effects; it should not alter the recommendation of healthcare providers regarding vaccinations.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8372667/#:~:text=Although it is rare with,mild elevation in the transaminases.

Drug-induced hepatotoxicity leads to nearly 10% of all cases of acute hepatitis and more than 50% cases of liver failure [18]. It is one of the common reasons for the withdrawal of medications from the market and modification of use [19]. It can be either type A (predictable), dose-related and short latent period in days, or type B (idiosyncratic), dose-independent, unpredictable, and variable latency [20,21]. Based on population-based studies, drug-induced liver injury incidence varies between 13.9 and 19.1 cases per 100,000 people per year [22,23]. Patients have either hepatocellular injury (three times upper limit of transaminase in comparison to ALP), cholestatic injury (three times increase in ALP comparison to transaminase), or mixed pattern (where both ALP and aminotransferase are three times upper limit) [24-26]. Most patients improve spontaneously after the removal of the offending drug. If acute liver failure (ALF) is suspected, early liver transplant referral is important due to high ALF mortality [25,27]. From the spontaneous reports from patients who received Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA in the UK between 9/12/20 and 26/05/2021, there are reports of 45 patients having abnormal liver function analysis and three patients having drug-induced liver injury [28].

In this case, the review of medications and history did not reveal any other reason for hepatotoxicity. She also denied the use of any over-the-counter medications or supplements. Although it is rare with vaccination, the COVID-19 vaccine is likely the cause of hepatotoxicity in our patient based on a diagnosis of exclusion. In this case, the patient had a cholestatic pattern with elevated ALP and bilirubin with mild elevation in the transaminases.

Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA trial included only 0.6% (217/37,706) patients with liver disease. Among patients with liver disease, 214 were with mild liver disease and only three with moderate to severe liver disease. This patient has underlying fatty liver disease. It is unclear if that was a likely risk factor for hepatotoxicity in this case [5].  Although only a small number were included in trials for Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA, Moderna mRNA-1273, and the AstraZeneca/University of Oxford ChAdOx1-nCoV-19 chimpanzee adenovirus vector vaccine, both the American Association for Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of Liver recommend vaccination against SARS-COV-2 with these highly effective and safe vaccines, given a greater risk of health consequences from SARS-COV-2 infection in these patients [29,30].

Hepatotoxicity can occur with vaccines, even though it is more common with prescription and nonprescription drugs. So, the clinician should be watchful in patients showing clinical signs and symptoms after a vaccine.

Conclusions

In summary, we presented a case of liver injury after the COVID-19 vaccine. We attributed the cause of liver injury to the COVID-19 vaccine, given no other cause in our patient after extensive work-up. There are reports of drug-induced liver injury and abnormal liver function analysis from the spontaneous reports from patients who received Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in the UK. The purpose of this manuscript is to raise awareness of potential side effects; it should not alter the recommendation of healthcare providers regarding vaccinations.

 

 

 

 

 

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But wait. There’s more…

Still waiting on you folks to wake up. 
 

And it’s football related. Would get Zucked on other threads. 
 

 

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Herbstreit has NOTHING to do with high school football, dumbass. Is it REALLY that hard to figure out? A blood clot is about football? What a load of bull shit. 

Post it on the next level forum....I do NOT care. But if you somehow think this is ok for the main HS forum, well, then I have been giving you more credit than I should have. 

As far as being :"zucked"......get the F over it and move on. You are STILL the only one whining like a bitch about it. 

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7 minutes ago, Irishman said:

Herbstreit has NOTHING to do with high school football, dumbass. Is it REALLY that hard to figure out? A blood clot is about football? What a load of bull shit. 

As far as being :"zuckered"......get the F over it and move on. You are STILL the only one whining like a bitch about it. 

Where did DE say Mr. Herbstreit had something to do with high school football?  

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24 minutes ago, DE said:

And it’s football related. Would get Zucked on other threads. 

 

Just now, Muda69 said:

Where did DE say Mr. Herbstreit had something to do with high school football?  

 

2 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Where did DE say Mr. Herbstreit had something to do with high school football?  

I did clarify my statement after you quoted me though
"Post it on the next level forum....I do NOT care. But if you somehow think this is ok for the main HS forum, well, then I have been giving you more credit than I should have."

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"football related" <> "high school football related", Irishman.  Everybody who follows football at practically any level knows Mr. Herbstreit is primarily a college football analyst/announcer/etc.    

And sorry, I don't know what "Zucked" means.  I assume it has something to do with the founder of Facebook, but I don't have and never will have a Facebook account.

 

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3 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

"football related" <> "high school football related", Irishman.  Everybody who follows football at practically any level knows Mr. Herbstreit is primarily a college football analyst/announcer/etc.    

And sorry, I don't know what "Zucked" means.  I assume it has something to do with the founder of Facebook, but I don't have and never will have a Facebook account.

 

That is what he means with that term. He did say "forums"...implying that it fits on any forum on the site. The ONLY forum his comments, along with many others, were deleted was on the high school forum. So I clarified that too. 

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1 hour ago, Muda69 said:

"football related" <> "high school football related", Irishman.  Everybody who follows football at practically any level knows Mr. Herbstreit is primarily a college football analyst/announcer/etc.    

And sorry, I don't know what "Zucked" means.  I assume it has something to do with the founder of Facebook, but I don't have and never will have a Facebook account.

 

I agree 100% with the line I put in bold. ......and would have been fine with it on the Next Level forum because of that. 

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5 hours ago, Irishman said:

Herbstreit has NOTHING to do with high school football, dumbass. Is it REALLY that hard to figure out? A blood clot is about football? What a load of bull shit. 

Post it on the next level forum....I do NOT care. But if you somehow think this is ok for the main HS forum, well, then I have been giving you more credit than I should have. 

As far as being :"zucked"......get the F over it and move on. You are STILL the only one whining like a bitch about it. 

Hit a nerve didn't I?

Put your name with your language.  If not, keep hiding and STFU.

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4 hours ago, Muda69 said:

"football related" <> "high school football related", Irishman.  Everybody who follows football at practically any level knows Mr. Herbstreit is primarily a college football analyst/announcer/etc.    

And sorry, I don't know what "Zucked" means.  I assume it has something to do with the founder of Facebook, but I don't have and never will have a Facebook account.

 

Sure.  Zucked means he got a huge power trip a few months ago and deleted all kinds of facts I posted that were 100% RELEVANT to HS FB.  But he will bitch and whine and spin it like he is.

He called it "spamming" when I got my suspension notice.  I call it, he didn't agree with the facts, so he pulled a power trip because of his "status" here, and suspended.

 

1 minute ago, Irishman said:

Nope, no nerve hit...just move on 

🥱

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