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Punttheball

Colts 2019

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On ‎8‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 7:02 PM, Boilernation said:

Highland, Indiana, the town that spawned the greatest troll in gridiron digest history and the GM who ruined Andrew Luck’s career. 

Yeah, Highland sucks.  I wish we could trade it for Flossmoor, Illinois.   But in my staying true to the thread, although I'm not a Colts fan (as is most of the...world), what they did to Luck the other day was pure garbage.  Crap like that happens in New York and Philadelphia, not here.  I thought we were better than that.

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I think the majority of fans were/are mad because of the timing of the retirement.  I don't fault the decision, but waiting until 2 weeks before the season starts was bad.  I seriously doubt Luck will come back.  If he tries, he will look like a hypocrite and a liar.  He would REALLY get booed then.  Brissett is the starter now.  People have to forget about 2017.  This team is much better than it was then.  He knows the playbook now too.  In 2017 he was learning it on the fly.  I see the Colts running the offense like business as usual even with JB at quarterback.  No, he isn't Luck, but Luck wasn't Manning either.

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2 minutes ago, itiswhatitis said:

I think the majority of fans were/are mad because of the timing of the retirement.  I don't fault the decision, but waiting until 2 weeks before the season starts was bad.  I seriously doubt Luck will come back.  If he tries, he will look like a hypocrite and a liar.  He would REALLY get booed then.  Brissett is the starter now.  People have to forget about 2017.  This team is much better than it was then.  He knows the playbook now too.  In 2017 he was learning it on the fly.  I see the Colts running the offense like business as usual even with JB at quarterback.  No, he isn't Luck, but Luck wasn't Manning either.

Understood, just looked bad.  It didn't really help that the whole thing was broadcast on TV.

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Andrew Luck Got Out.  I Couldn't: https://deadspin.com/football-doesnt-let-you-leave-1837662990

Quote

Empathy isn’t one of football’s commanding virtues. You don’t play because you care about the other guy’s pain. You play because you want to crush him. Same goes for watching—either you disconnect from the consequences, or you can’t really enjoy it.

While Andrew Luck’s decision to retire has baffled many fans (and I include journalists here, because journalists are the biggest fans), every NFL player understands why he’s doing it. When you make it to the NFL, people tell you that you’re living the dream. They tell you how lucky you are. They tell you it’s a good thing you don’t have to get a real job like they had to, because their lives suck and yours is awesome. When people constantly tell you how great you have it, it’s hard to do anything but nod and agree, even when you feel something else entirely.

Fans only see NFL players on Sundays, and only the guys who are healthy enough to play. But there are 349 other days of the year, and there only 22 guys on the field at a time. The rest of the days and the rest of the men are caught up in what Andrew Luck referred to as, “the cycle of injury, pain and rehab.” If you play football past high school, you are familiar with it. Three of my six seasons in the NFL ended on injured reserve. Broken tibia, ruptured groin, dislocated/separated shoulders, torn hamstrings, cracked ribs, fingers, concussions, bulging discs, torn knee ligaments, etc. The glory was fleeting; the injuries were constant. And everyone I spoke to reminded me that I was living the dream.

But it was never my dream to be lying on a training table for four hours a day, hooked up to machines, ice bags strapped to my body, while my teammates went to meetings and practiced. It was never my dream to wake up in the morning and wonder how I’d get through the day, to drive to work in pain and confusion, on the verge of tears, trying to understand how things got to this point. What I had done wrong—because, if I was so unhappy while living the dream, I must have done something wrong, right?

It was never my dream to turn on the TV and hear entitled assholes speculating about my health, my injuries, and devoting segments on their shows to discussing my medical file, guffawing their way through segment after segment about the hell I have endured. But that’s what life becomes for NFL players: reciting tired sound bites through gritted teeth and long, sleepless nights, handfuls of pills, and early-morning rehab sessions, sideways looks from coaches who want you on that field, who need you on that field, or else your ass is gone. That feeling that follows you wherever you go, whoever you talk to, that the line of questioning will be—when are you coming back? How’s the shoulder? We’re counting on you!

“Oh, it’s coming along,” you’ll say, knowing that it isn’t. Knowing that it’s only getting worse. Knowing that there is something else in the way, some worm in your conscience preventing the unabashed, enthusiastic healing process that is integral to a speedy football recovery. When the mindset is singular and the body is newer, healing is less complicated. But when the injuries pile on top of one another, and the residue from each one sticks to your bones, and your muscles refuse to forget what you’ve put them through, then your “love of the game” finally gets a cup-check, and that’s right about at the age of 27 or 28.

Call it a confluence of perspectives. The body is no longer cooperating. The adrenaline of game-day has subsided. The adulation of the fans no longer excites. Neither does the big check every week. The shine begins to wear off the Shield. You imagine yourself on a beach. On an island. Far from a football field, free from the mental anguish and paranoia you live with every day. Still, you soldier on, because everything in your life has steered you onto that field.

As a child, the spinning football called me to chase it. My heroes wore red and gold. They postered my walls. By the time I saw John Taylor catch the winning touchdown from Joe Montana in Super Bowl XXIII, I was a full-fledged, capital-B Believer. Whatever I could do to get there, I would. And I did. And once I put on my pads, like all football players, I became a prisoner of my success; a slave to my toughness. I wore that badge with pride and had no qualms about where it was taking me. But then my body started to fail me; injury after injury, disappointment after disappointment.

No matter how rough things got, though, I always worked my way back, never wanting an injury to define me. Never wanting weakness to be my final act. That’s the pact you make when you put on that helmet. That’s what grandpa expected, that’s what dad expects, and what all of your coaches and friends and neighbors expect. That kid who told you you’d never make it. That coach who cut you in college. The reporter who said you weren’t worth a shit. You’ll show them all. You’ll have the last laugh.

And so you play until they drag your lifeless body from the grass, and it’s all you can do to muster a thumbs-up as they wheel you into the tunnel, knowing that’s how you secure your legacy. Every football player knows how to make that sacrifice. But few know how to walk away. That seems to be changing, and thank god for that.

Somewhere, Andrew Luck is laughing.

 

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players choose this path and they choose when to leave this game at the highest level.   They are well compensated for this choice.   I blame no one for leaving the game when they want to leave the game   

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18 minutes ago, CoachPeo said:

Injuries take their toll, and when it is time it is time.  

Why people can't figure that out is beyond me...

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5 hours ago, CoachPeo said:

Injuries take their toll, and when it is time it is time.  

I think this is a trend we are going to see more and more in the future.  It isn't that Luck has started something.  I think players are going to consider their quality of life down the road and pass up on the ""glory".  The mentality has always been "tough guy".  I think that is starting to fade and players are making smarter choices these days.  It sucks for the fans to see their heroes leave the game early, but we have to remember these players are just flesh and bone like the rest of us.  As much as we want them to be superheroes with super powers, in the end they aren't.  I would imagine there are some fans who would rather have seen Luck play, suffer a career ending injury rather than just retire.  Those types just don't get it.

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I was not a professional football player, I played Division 3 and suffered numerous injuries.  My Junior year after three knee injuries, two shoulder injuries and a recent back injury, I went to my Head coach to discuss if I wanted to continue playing.  The process of working out in the off season, starting the season, getting hurt, then rehabbing, only to get hurt again wears on you.  You can easily get to a dark place.  I continued to play, but four surgeries by age 36 has really made things difficult.  Everyday I am in pain so I get why Luck walked away.  

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15 hours ago, itiswhatitis said:

I think this is a trend we are going to see more and more in the future.  It isn't that Luck has started something.  I think players are going to consider their quality of life down the road and pass up on the ""glory".  The mentality has always been "tough guy".  I think that is starting to fade and players are making smarter choices these days.  It sucks for the fans to see their heroes leave the game early, but we have to remember these players are just flesh and bone like the rest of us.  As much as we want them to be superheroes with super powers, in the end they aren't.  I would imagine there are some fans who would rather have seen Luck play, suffer a career ending injury rather than just retire.  Those types just don't get it.

We need to, players are human beings, not robots...

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Caught the game last night with the Bengals.  Overall the defense played well.  The offense looked good in the first half.  Kelly has been impressive in the preseason.  It's time to cut Walker.  I think Hentges will be our 4th tight end.  Speed had a great game.  Won't be surprised if he ends up starting before the season is over.  Looked like another Leonard out there last night.  Phillips and Johnson also played well.  Loved the sack by Snippy.  Was good to see Campbell finally get some action and did well.  Even without neck beard I think the Colts can make the playoffs.

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Game thoughts:  Brissett was fine.  Made some great throws and decisions.  Had one drop by Doyle that was a laser and a tough bang bang throw to Ebron that was ruled incomplete.  The defense had moments,but for the most part was bad.  I thought the run fits were terrible.  Darius Leonard looked the worse I have ever seen him in the run game.  He was swallowed up by the chargers at times and he took poor angles to the point of attack.  Pass rush was good at times.  It seemed that Houston was a non-factor in the 4th quarter.  Special teams were plain bad.  They did come up with a turnover on the muffed punt, but them #4 missed a chip shot field goal.  I am not sure we should be worrying about the offense as much as the other two phases.  Luck would not have made a difference yesterday.  

Edited by Punttheball

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17 minutes ago, Punttheball said:

Game thoughts:  Brissett was fine.  Made some great throws and decisions.  Had one drop by Doyle that was a laser and a tough bang bang throw to Ebron that was ruled incomplete.  The defense had moments,but for the most part was bad.  I thought the run fits were terrible.  Darius Leonard looked the worse I have ever seen him in the run game.  He was swallowed up by the chargers at times and he took poor angles to the point of attack.  Pass rush was good at times.  It seemed that Houston was a non-factor in the 4th quarter.  Special teams were plain bad.  They did come up with a turnover on the muffed punt, but them #4 missed a chip shot field goal.  I am not sure we should be worrying about the offense as much as the other two phases.  Luck would not have made a difference yesterday.  

You are leaving out one part lol

 

Marlon Mack is an ABSOLUTE BELLCOW.  What a beast that guy is.  I heard during the Vikings  game “yeah the times of giving a RB 25 carries a game are long over in today’s game”

 

colts were like “hold my beer” 

Edited by DumfriesYMCA

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51 minutes ago, DumfriesYMCA said:

You are leaving out one part lol

 

Marlon Mack is an ABSOLUTE BELLCOW.  What a beast that guy is.  I heard during the Vikings  game “yeah the times of giving a RB 25 carries a game are long over in today’s game”

 

colts were like “hold my beer” 

Agree...He definitely got into a grove and the line was clicking.  

We looked weak on the right side of the line in pass protection a few times.

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I sat in with Tom Rathman, Colts RB coach and also OC for the Colts in a free coaching clinic offered to Indiana HS football coaches.  (what a great event, first time I have seen Shrimp as an appetizer for a clinic) and to a man, they were talking about Mack and if you do fantasy you better scoop him up!!!   Dude just hasn't been healthy, but he is now and it showed. 

Also, spending 2 hours in the RB room with Rathman will get you going....... 

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Is yesterday's performance by Mr. Vinatieri hint of things to come?

 

 

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5 hours ago, Muda69 said:

Is yesterday's performance by Mr. Vinatieri hint of things to come?

 

 

If mason crosby can miss 4 FGs and an extra point last year to the lions and keep his job, Adam Vinatieri will keep his....he will probably rebound for a huge game this week. 

 

The man has had a spectacular 24 year career. I’m not going to doubt him now after 1 bad game.  

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Well, did we all just witness Mr. Vinatieri's last game in a Colt uniform?  Will he retire before next week's game?

 

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2 hours ago, Muda69 said:

Well, did we all just witness Mr. Vinatieri's last game in a Colt uniform?  Will he retire before next week's game?

 

Quite possibly.

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On 9/16/2019 at 8:17 AM, Muda69 said:

Well, did we all just witness Mr. Vinatieri's last game in a Colt uniform?  Will he retire before next week's game?

 

Apparently the Indy front office wants to keep Vinny around. Personally, I'm not sure if the alternatives are any better with it being week 3.

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