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Muda69

New Donald Trump thread

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21 minutes ago, Howe said:

I use the term "libtard" to describe those who suffer from Trump Derangement Syndrome and refuse to apply common sense. I never reply to a comment by calling the member a libtard. This forum has members calling each others liars and worse quite freguently.

*frequently*

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Muda69 said:

Interesting the amount of apparent back channel communication that goes on between the GID cognoscenti and GID admins.

 

It's good to have friends, Muda69. You should try it sometimes. But then again I can see why most other rational individuals would want to stay far away from you...........

Edited by gonzoron
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18 hours ago, Bobref said:

This is intellectually unworthy of you. 

Thank you for your support.

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18 hours ago, Coach Nowlin said:

The Muda Pingpong Cat GIF continues strong so many years and a few rebuilds later.  

Oh  by the way, I went out yesterday,  Costco, Liquor store of course, Bank, and enjoyed wearing my mask.   No issues, doesn't bother me one bit 

Howdy Mr. Nowlin,

Do you have a copy of the Pingpong Cat GIF somewhere?  I can't seem to find mine anymore................

I will wear a mask in public if the establishment I want to enter requires it.  I honestly have issues with breathing and the heat buildup caused by them, not to mention the constant fiddling due to eyeglasss fogging up. Am considering just switching to a cheap balaclava I've owned for several years.

 

 

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11 hours ago, gonzoron said:

It's good to have friends, Muda69. You should try it sometimes. But then again I can see why most other rational individuals would want to stay far away from you...........

Interesting that you would plagiarize an observation I made several days ago about yourself, gonzo.  That you remembered it so succinctly tells us it must have hit home.  Mission Accomplished.

 

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59 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Interesting that you would plagiarize an observation I made several days ago about yourself, gonzo.  That you remembered it so succinctly tells us it must have hit home.  Mission Accomplished.

 

"Paraphrase" would be a more fitting description. The words of yours are highlighted as red, which is common practice for some when quoting here on the GID.

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On 5/15/2020 at 4:16 PM, swordfish said:

I think the "explanation" from Ms. Sykes is pretty racist....And addresses none of the facts in the story above ....She needs to stick to her comedy - She will have a larger, more diverse audience that way......

https://www.voanews.com/usa/us-politics/what-obamagate

U.S. President Donald Trump's long-standing accusation of criminality against his Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama, has taken on a new name: Obamagate.

In this new iteration being hotly promoted by Trump and his right-wing allies, Obama officials in the waning days of his administration conspired to entrap Trump's national security adviser, Michael Flynn, as part of a larger plot to bring down the incoming president.

The conspiracy theory took on new life after the Justice Department, in a dramatic about-face last week, moved to drop its criminal case against Flynn, saying the FBI was not justified in investigating him over his 2016 conversations with Russia's former ambassador to Washington.

FILE - Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves the federal courthouse in Washington, following a status hearing, July 10, 2018.

FILE - Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves the federal courthouse in Washington, following a status hearing, July 10, 2018.

As part of its reassessment of the Flynn case, the Justice Department released a deluge of records that shed light on previously unknown Obama administration deliberations over Flynn. That led Trump to claim that Flynn had been illegally targeted and that the decision to investigate him went all the way up to the previous president.

"The biggest political crime in American history, by far!" Trump said in one of a blizzard of tweets and retweets referencing Obamagate on Sunday.

In short order, the hashtag "Obamagate" went viral, giving an old conspiracy theory a new twist.

Asked on Monday to describe Obama's alleged crime, Trump would only offer that "some terrible things happened, and it should never be allowed to happen in our country." He predicted further disclosures in the coming weeks.

Obama is a favorite and frequent target of Trump's attacks. Trump turned up the heat on his predecessor after Obama, in leaked comments to former officials in his administration, blasted the Justice Department's decision to let Flynn off the hook, saying the "rule of law is at risk."

By advancing new allegations against the former president, Trump is also apparently seeking to implicate his likely opponent this fall, Obama's vice president, Joe Biden.

Here is a primer on the controversy.

Obamagate origins

At its core, Obamagate is an old allegation given a new name.

As early as March 2017, Trump alleged that Obama had illegally wiretapped the billionaire businessman at Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential election campaign, comparing the alleged surveillance to the Nixon-era Watergate scandal. The following year, Trump claimed that the FBI had planted an informant inside his campaign, dubbing the alleged conspiracy "Spygate."

Russia's ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak, speaks with reporters in Washington, Jan. 13, 2017.

FILE - Russia's ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak, speaks with reporters in Washington, Jan. 13, 2017.

The main allegation in Obamagate is that the former president directed the Flynn investigation, even though the FBI had no legitimate reason to probe the retired three-star general. Flynn, a one-time Democrat, served as the Obama administration's top military intelligence official before being forced out of the job and later aligning with Trump.

Flynn was investigated twice in 2016 and 2017, first as part of the FBI's probe into ties between the Trump campaign and Russia, and later over a series of conversations he had with Russia's then-ambassador to Washington, Sergey Kislyak, in which he counseled the Russians to refrain from retaliation against Obama administration sanctions — hinting that Trump would soften them once in office.

 

Oval Office meeting 

Central to the Obamagate conspiracy theory is an Oval Office meeting between Obama and his national security team on Jan. 5, 2017, just 15 days before Trump took office.

The meeting came the day after the FBI moved to formally close its investigation into Flynn's suspected ties to Russia before deciding to keep it open after learning about his intercepted calls to Kislyak.

Top intelligence officials briefed Obama on their findings on Russian election meddling. At the end of the meeting, the president asked FBI Director James Comey and Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates to stay behind. Joining them were Vice President Joe Biden and National Security Adviser Susan Rice. 

FILE - Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington, June 28, 2016.

FILE - Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington, June 28, 2016.

As Yates recounted during a 2017 interview with special counsel Robert Mueller's team, Obama began by saying "he had learned of the information about Flynn" and his conversations with Kislyak regarding the sanctions on Russia.

This was news to Yates, who as the Justice Department's No. 2 official oversaw the FBI but had not been told about it.

As Comey later told the House Intelligence Committee, he alerted CIA Director John Brennan as soon as he learned about the Flynn calls. Brennan in turn briefed Obama.

Yates and Rice later recounted what Obama said at the meeting. According to Yates, while Obama said he did not want details of the investigation, he asked "whether the White House should be treating Flynn differently" during the remaining days of the administration.

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.

FILE - FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2016.

Yates did not recall Comey's response to the question. In an email to herself on Obama's last day in office, Rice memorialized that Obama reiterated at the meeting that "our law enforcement team needs to proceed as it normally would by the book."

Yates and other former officials have defended the Flynn investigation. Yet, the fact that the White House meeting came the day after the FBI was preparing to close the Flynn investigation, and Obama was aware of Flynn's wiretapped calls to Kislyak, has led Trump, right-wing commentators and Flynn's lawyers to claim that the subsequent Flynn investigation over his calls to Kislyak constituted an anti-Trump conspiracy that reached the highest levels of the Obama administration.

"So, the whole thing was orchestrated and set up within the FBI, (former national intelligence director James) Clapper, Brennan and in the Oval Office meeting that day with President Obama," Sydney Powell, Flynn's attorney, told Fox News on Sunday.

Recently declassified FBI records of the Flynn case that were turned over to Flynn's lawyers provided further fodder for conspiracy theory promoters.

In one widely cited handwritten note, a top FBI official mused whether the goal of interviewing Flynn over his calls to the Russian ambassador was to "get him fired" or get him to lie.

Unmasking of Flynn

The Obamagate conspiracy theory feeds off another allegation: the politically motivated unmasking of Flynn's identity during the Trump transition period.

U.S. intelligence analysts routinely "mask" the identity of U.S. persons whose communications are incidentally collected during intelligence-gathering on foreign officials. Flynn's conversations with Kislyak were apparently overheard during a routine interception of Kislyak's calls.

Authorized national security officials seeking to understand the underlying intelligence can ask the National Security Agency to "unmask" an individual's identity.

This is a common practice. But Trump and his allies have long accused former Obama administration officials of illegally unmasking Flynn's identity for political purposes.

This week, Richard Grennell, a close Trump ally who serves as acting director of national intelligence, disclosed the names of more than a dozen Obama officials who requested the unmasking of Flynn's identity during the final weeks of the administration.

The list includes a string of Obama administration officials Trump has long viewed as his enemies — Brennan, James Clapper, director of national intelligence, and Comey.

Prospects for an investigation

Since starting Obamagate, Trump has been pressing congressional Republicans to investigate Obama. That prospect is highly unlikely.

"If I were a Senator or Congressman, the first person I would call to testify about the biggest political crime and scandal in the history of the USA, by FAR, is former President Obama," Trump tweeted on Thursday. "He knew EVERYTHING. Do it @LindseyGrahamSC, just do it. No more Mr. Nice Guy. No more talk!" Trump tweeted on Thursday.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., is surrounded by reporters after he and Republican lawmakers met…

FILE - Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill, Feb. 25, 2020.

But Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, a Trump confidant, says he is not interested in dragging Obama before Congress.

"I don't think now's the time for me to do that," Graham told Politico. "I don't know if that's even possible."

But Graham vowed to call in Trump administration officials as his committee investigates the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation.

For their part, Biden and other Democrats dismiss Obamagate as a blatant attempt by Trump to divert attention from growing criticism of his handling of the coronavirus crisis. 

A much better explanation than "because he's a black man, and still is" ........

 

SF wonders if Howe, Gonzo, Irish, Trojan had nothing better to do on a beautiful Saturday then sit on this thread and post over 4 pages of something that had NOTHING to do with the current President......So here was the discussion from Friday afternoon........

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1 hour ago, Muda69 said:

Do you have a copy of the Pingpong Cat GIF somewhere?  I can't seem to find mine anymore................

Your IT skills are slipping.

Ping Pong GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

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47 minutes ago, gonzoron said:

Your IT skills are slipping.

Ping Pong GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Thank you. Getting old like you I guess.

 

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On 5/16/2020 at 7:54 AM, Bobref said:

The plot thickens! Now what we need is a good, old-fashioned snitch. How about if the admins award points as a bounty to whoever comes forward with information that leads to the unmasking of this dual-ID fiend?

We call that a witness around here. 

 

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18 hours ago, Irishman said:

I guess you cannot let go of inserting yourself into the discussion. You want to call someone out in accurately, then be prepared for the responses. 
So NOW you decide to insert the terms “recent history” and “last few days”? Ok funny, but ok

Libtard does not set me off at all. I described it perfectly in a previous post. It is simply intellectually lazy. You are correct, he is not the only one that has posted something that could be offensive. Are you going to own your own role in that? 
 

Ok..I hear ya.  You are one of those type people that can offer feedback, but not good at taking it.  I shared my PERCEPTION of your targeted posts as being biased.  I get you don't like that.  You don't have to accept it and you could certainly ignore it.  But it is my perception and it is what it is.

Absolutely I accept my role and really don't care if you like or dislike my tone.  Report me, ignore me, chastise me, or stay silent...at the end of the day, I don't care.  But offer you opinion away...I ignored it the first few times.  I do take exception that you singled out Howe, while letting GID friends off the hook.

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19 minutes ago, TrojanDad said:

Ok..I hear ya.  You are one of those type people that can offer feedback, but not good at taking it.  I shared my PERCEPTION of your targeted posts as being biased.  I get you don't like that.  You don't have to accept it and you could certainly ignore it.  But it is my perception and it is what it is.

Absolutely I accept my role and really don't care if you like or dislike my tone.  Report me, ignore me, chastise me, or stay silent...at the end of the day, I don't care.  But offer you opinion away...I ignored it the first few times.  I do take exception that you singled out Howe, while letting GID friends off the hook.

I have always viewed him as much more of a partisan than a moderator.

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1 hour ago, TrojanDad said:

Ok..I hear ya.  You are one of those type people that can offer feedback, but not good at taking it. 

Possibly the government school teacher career,  used to passing out judgments instead of being judged. Combined with the GID position of authority he holds over the rest of us peons such feedback is probably difficult to stomach.

 

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5 hours ago, swordfish said:

SF wonders if Howe, Gonzo, Irish, Trojan had nothing better to do on a beautiful Saturday then sit on this thread and post over 4 pages of something that had NOTHING to do with the current President......So here was the discussion from Friday afternoon........

3 of the 5 still don't.

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3 hours ago, TrojanDad said:

Ok..I hear ya.  You are one of those type people that can offer feedback, but not good at taking it.  I shared my PERCEPTION of your targeted posts as being biased.  I get you don't like that.  You don't have to accept it and you could certainly ignore it.  But it is my perception and it is what it is.

Absolutely I accept my role and really don't care if you like or dislike my tone.  Report me, ignore me, chastise me, or stay silent...at the end of the day, I don't care.  But offer you opinion away...I ignored it the first few times.  I do take exception that you singled out Howe, while letting GID friends off the hook.

 

2 hours ago, Howe said:

I have always viewed him as much more of a partisan than a moderator.

 

1 hour ago, Muda69 said:

Possibly the government school teacher career,  used to passing out judgments instead of being judged. Combined with the GID position of authority he holds over the rest of us peons such feedback is probably difficult to stomach.

 

Awwwwww look at the cute little threesome we have going here. lol 

Get upset because someone called someone out on a post; and turn right around to do the exact same thing. It's adorable really. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Irishman said:

Awwwwww look at the cute little threesome we have going here. lol 

Get upset because someone called someone out on a post; and turn right around to do the exact same thing. It's adorable really. 

Upset? Hardly. Amused is more like it. 

And frankly one should expect more impartiality and less ridicule from a member of the GID Administration.

 

 

Edited by Muda69
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Just now, Muda69 said:

Upset? Hardly. Amused is more like it. 

And frankly one should expect more impartiality and less ridicule from a member of the GID Administration.

 

 

Yeah....so a guy who gives the sit and spin reaction is amused? yeah ok.......like I said Saturday; you're funny. 

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2 minutes ago, Irishman said:

Yeah....so a guy who gives the sit and spin reaction is amused? yeah ok.......like I said Saturday; you're funny. 

Yes Irishman, amused.  Picturing you on one of these:

 

713FObShp1L._AC_SL1500_.jpg

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2 hours ago, Irishman said:

Awwwwww look at the cute little threesome we have going here. lol 

Get upset because someone called someone out on a post; and turn right around to do the exact same thing. It's adorable really. 

getting stuck in a mud hole .... aint nobody got time for that ...

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1 minute ago, Muda69 said:

Yes Irishman, amused.  Picturing you on one of these:

 

713FObShp1L._AC_SL1500_.jpg

Well that changes everything........I apologize for misinterpreting the sit and spin reaction then. 😄

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Back on topic:

The Massive Trump Coronavirus Supply Effort that the Media Loves to Hate

https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/05/the-massive-trump-coronavirus-supply-effort-that-the-media-loves-to-hate/

Quote

There is a new cardinal rule in journalism — never write anything favorable about the Trump administration’s coronavirus response, even about its successes.

It’s why the story of how the administration handled the potential ventilator crisis has gone almost entirely untold, and why its effort to secure supplies of personal protective equipment, or PPE, has been gotten largely skeptical or hostile coverage.

Any government response to a once-in-a-generation crisis is going to be subject to legitimate criticism, and there’s no question that almost every major government in the Western world, including ours, should have acted sooner. But to read the press, there is basically nothing good that the Trump administration has done over the last three months.

This is manifestly false. In a briefing for reporters last week on FEMA’s work securing PPE, FEMA administrator Peter Gaynor laid out the raw numbers: FEMA, HHS, and the private sector have shipped or are currently shipping 92.7 million N95 respirators, 133 million surgical masks, 10.5 million face shields, 42.4 million surgical gowns, and 989 million gloves.

According to Admiral John Polowczyk, head of the supply-chain task force at FEMA, we manufactured roughly 30 million N95 respirators domestically a month before the COVID-19 crisis. He says we are on a path now to ramp up to 180 million N95 respirators a month.

None of this happened by accident. At a time of unprecedented stress on the supply chain and a yawning gap between supply and demand in the market, it required considerable clever improvisation and determined hustle. This was not your average bureaucratic response. It was a partnership between the public and private sector to get supplies to the United States on an urgent basis and ship them to the places that needed them most, and then begin to ramp up manufacturing here at home.

A team around White House adviser Jared Kushner and the supply-chain task force under Admiral Polowczyk worked to fly supplies from overseas to the U.S. quickly, to vet leads for additional PPE (the work of volunteers from the business world mustered by Kushner’s team), and to build a cooperative relationship with 3M, the country’s most important manufacturer of N95 respirators.

The story of what they’ve done is a key part of the administration’s response, even if it has been obscured by a press that has an allergy to anything that has worked.

Kitchen-Sink Attacks
The initiative to secure PPE has been the subject of constant criticism, whether it makes much sense or not.

Senator Chuck Schumer (D., N.Y.) has repeatedly said that the president needed a military leader to take charge of the supply chain — when Admiral Polowczyk, the vice director of logistics for the joint chiefs, was already in charge.

The administration has been urged over and over again to invoke the Defense Production Act — when it has indeed used this act many times to prod and guide the supply chain, just not to take over industries wholesale.

Stories in the press have tended to relay complaints that FEMA has “commandeered” supplies headed for states or other entities. According to FEMA, this is erroneous. After looking into supposed instances of commandeering, Gaynor says, FEMA believes that shady brokers have been using this line an excuse for their own failures. “FEMA has become a convenient scapegoat for malicious actors who are unable to deliver on the promises they had made or are engaging in illegal activity,” he says.

They might make promise to various potential buyers and then pull the rug out from under them when they get a higher bid, explaining that the situation is out of their control because FEMA swooped in and took the material. Gaynor is emphatic that “FEMA does not have the authority to conduct seizures.”

A typical journalistic tack has been to find someone who had a frustrating experience with the administration and make him representative of the entire effort.

A large, quintuple by-lined New York Times feature on Kushner’s volunteers was a particularly egregious example of the genre. It found a doctor named Jeffrey Hendricks who approached the federal government with information that he had “longtime manufacturing contacts in China and a line on millions of masks from established suppliers.”

This wasn’t earth-shattering information, given that many tipsters said exactly the same thing. According to the Times, Hendricks was disappointed when it took weeks to act on his request before a site visit was finally set up to inspect the masks.

After the story appeared, Hendricks said it “did not fully reflect my experience.”

....

There’s no doubt that some hospitals, especially public hospitals, lacked the gear they needed at the outset of the crisis, and even those that didn’t have shortages felt as though they were living on the edge.

Polowczyk says that he believes every place that needed PPE got it, although he had “the unenviable job of managing scarcity as we went through March into April and now May, where the volume of supplies has increased.”

He explains that during the worst period, “people, hospitals, point-of-care, were getting supplies on the numbers-of-days amounts instead of, ‘Hey, I want like a month, two months.’”  He says he can understand how this just-in-time allocation method “would make you feel uncomfortable,” adding that as supplies were focused on hot spots, “other areas of the country that did not have such significant COVID outbreaks certainly got less of an allocation and were fed as needed.”

How the administration worked through this and got to a better place would seem an interesting story, if the press weren’t too vehemently opposed to Trump to even consider occasionally giving some credit where it’s due.

OMB.

TDS.

 

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