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https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/31604970/college-football-playoff-consider-expanding-12-team-format
It appears the new system will be 12 teams. Looks like the powers that be are pushing ND into  joining a conference. The AD, Jack Swarbick confirms that ND CANNOT qualify for a bye in the 12 team format. Seems to be asking for problems. If the Irish defeat a conference champion during the regular season, why would that team be eligible for a bye and not ND? 

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1 hour ago, Irishman said:

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/31604970/college-football-playoff-consider-expanding-12-team-format
It appears the new system will be 12 teams. Looks like the powers that be are pushing ND into  joining a conference. The AD, Jack Swarbick confirms that ND CANNOT qualify for a bye in the 12 team format. Seems to be asking for problems. If the Irish defeat a conference champion during the regular season, why would that team be eligible for a bye and not ND? 

Or…..treat ND like all other independents.  I know. Won’t happen. ND generates too much money. 
 

If not, join a conference ND. 

If not, then ND is SOL. 
 

Will despise the CFP Committee should they make new concessions JUST for ND. 

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10 minutes ago, DE said:

Or…..treat ND like all other independents.  I know. Won’t happen. ND generates too much money. 
 

If not, join a conference ND. 

If not, then ND is SOL. 
 

Will despise the CFP Committee should they make new concessions JUST for ND. 

Does not really sound like they will make concessions, but will impede their chances should they earn a spot. 

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7 hours ago, Irishman said:

Does not really sound like they will make concessions, but will impede their chances should they earn a spot. 

Heaven forbid they play in a conference championship game!!!!

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7 minutes ago, temptation said:

Heaven forbid they play in a conference championship game!!!!

I have no issue with them joining a conference, if they simply choose to join one. But I don’t like seeing them getting cheated out of a potential spot earned just because they are not in a conference. 

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25 minutes ago, Irishman said:

I have no issue with them joining a conference, if they simply choose to join one. But I don’t like seeing them getting cheated out of a potential spot earned just because they are not in a conference. 

Oh, I don’t either but the exceptions made for Notre Dame in the previous agreement give me little sympathy were that to be the case.

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As a ND fan no problem with this... I’d rather have a chance to get in the playoffs without a bye then not making the playoffs at all. Take care of business on the field and you’re the #5 seed, play and beat the #12 seed, and then worry about the Alabama’s OSUs Clemsons etc... 

the new format, I think, will allow ND a loss or 2 against quality opponents each season compared to 12-0 or 11-1 to make the playoffs. 10-2 or (gasp) 9-3 could still get them in with the new system.

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11 hours ago, Irishman said:

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/31604970/college-football-playoff-consider-expanding-12-team-format
It appears the new system will be 12 teams. Looks like the powers that be are pushing ND into  joining a conference. The AD, Jack Swarbick confirms that ND CANNOT qualify for a bye in the 12 team format. Seems to be asking for problems. If the Irish defeat a conference champion during the regular season, why would that team be eligible for a bye and not ND? 

In 2 years when this kicks in, the Irish will play both Clemson and Ohio State in the regular season. Imagine an undefeated ND, conquerors of both those powerhouses, that cannot get a bye in the playoff because they’re not in a conference, and thus, no conference championship game. It’s now time for ND to figure out how important the benefits of their independent status are vs. the advantages of being able to play a conference championship game.

The ACC is currently the best fit, since all other ND teams are conference members, except hockey, since the ACC doesn’t play hockey.

Currently, ACC football teams play 8 conference games, 6 in your division, and 2 crossover games. That leaves 4 non-conference games. ND could still play Navy and USC, and that leaves 2 other games the Irish could use to “show the flag” in other areas of the country — something that has always been deemed essential, since the Irish have to recruit nationally. I think it’s clearly doable. But if the Irish think 8 conference games doesn’t give them the flexibility they need, the $$ they bring to the table might allow them entry into a conference that plays fewer games, or initiate a change in conference scheduling procedures. For example, the ACC has 14 teams, 7 in each division. If they added ND (and one other in order to make an even number), they could go to a 7 game, all division opponents conference schedule, freeing up 1 more game to schedule non-con opponents. 

It’s clearly doable. But somebody is going to have to make a hard decision. The one undeniable factor is that this is about $$, and nobody can bring more $$ to the table than Notre Dame.

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I agree that 12 is too many, but to add to what Wolves said, teams with one or two losses has a chance. More teams will be in the picture later in the season. ESPN just showed what the brackets looked like if it had been in place. Indiana and Coastal Carolina would have qualified. That said, I think Alabama and Clemson will still be dominant. 

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2 minutes ago, Bobref said:

In 2 years when this kicks in, the Irish will play both Clemson and Ohio State in the regular season. Imagine an undefeated ND, conquerors of both those powerhouses, that cannot get a bye in the playoff because they’re not in a conference, and thus, no conference championship game. It’s now time for ND to figure out how important the benefits of their independent status are vs. the advantages of being able to play a conference championship game.

The ACC is currently the best fit, since all other ND teams are conference members, except hockey, since the ACC doesn’t play hockey.

Currently, ACC football teams play 8 conference games, 6 in your division, and 2 crossover games. That leaves 4 non-conference games. ND could still play Navy and USC, and that leaves 2 other games the Irish could use to “show the flag” in other areas of the country — something that has always been deemed essential, since the Irish have to recruit nationally. I think it’s clearly doable. But if the Irish think 8 conference games doesn’t give them the flexibility they need, the $$ they bring to the table might allow them entry into a conference that plays fewer games, or initiate a change in conference scheduling procedures. For example, the ACC has 14 teams, 7 in each division. If they added ND (and one other in order to make an even number), they could go to a 7 game, all division opponents conference schedule, freeing up 1 more game to schedule non-con opponents. 

It’s clearly doable. But somebody is going to have to make a hard decision. The one undeniable factor is that this is about $$, and nobody can bring more $$ to the table than Notre Dame.

Stanford and......Texas/OU

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8 minutes ago, DE said:

Stanford and......Texas/OU

I’d rather see a B1G team than Stanford. They already play USC from the PAC 10. If they go to a schedule where they can only play 4 non-cons a season, I think Stanford is odd man out.

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1 hour ago, Bobref said:

I’d rather see a B1G team than Stanford. They already play USC from the PAC 10. If they go to a schedule where they can only play 4 non-cons a season, I think Stanford is odd man out.

I was just tossing them out there, so every year, they play in California like normal years.

Huge recruiting/football hotbeds: Texas (why I mentioned them and OU), Florida (will play in the Southeast in the ACC), New Jersey (will play in the Northeast in the ACC) and California (see Stanford/USC above).

When they don't play O$U, they can add Michigan or whomever.

If they are looking for a "fluff" type game, they can schedule a 2nd tier B1G team too (Shamrock Series flexibility should this series continue).

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Meh, this expanded football playoff is all about the money:  https://deadspin.com/a-12-team-playoff-won-t-change-the-fact-that-the-same-t-1847074509

 

Quote

Well, ladies and gentlemen, it looks like a 12-team college football playoff format could be on the horizon.

The College Football Playoff’s working group, which consists of SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey, Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby, Mountain West Commissioner Craig Thompson and Notre Dame Athletic Director Jack Swarbrick, is expected to release a recommendation for an expanded playoff format.

It’s an interesting idea that will create more playoff football for teams across division one which could be entertaining. It will also likely create more money for schools and conferences.

But let’s not kid ourselves here, it’s not going to fix parity in college football like many have been brainwashed to believe. The schools and playoff organizers want you to think this is about parity and everyone getting a shot, when in actuality it’s more centered around generating extra money in a sport that refuses to pay for its labor.

 

I’m not even mad that the playoff organizers and schools are reaching for more money, I just wish they would come out and say that and then pay their workers accordingly. But they won’t, especially with NIL on the rise.

If you want to fix parity in college football, you have to make stricter rules on recruiting so that every 5-star athlete can’t attend Clemson, Alabama, Ohio State, or Oklahoma, who have dominated the current four-team format. Out of the 28 spots available in the playoff since 2014, those schools have accounted for 20.

But the NCAA can’t limit recruiting and restrict where these 5-star athletes choose to go play, so they’re stuck between a rock and hard place. And their solution is just to add more games, when in actuality what we will continue to see is the same schools consistently making it to the “Final Four” every year... again.

You want to know why? Because they still have the best players on the field 9 out of 10 times. If you want evidence of this, just look at the majority of 1-seed versus 4-seed games that we’ve had in the college football playoff since 2014. Most of these matchups have been duds because, in a typical college football season, there are not four teams good enough to win a national title. And there definitely won’t be 12.

In addition, the NCAA is now introducing the possibility of more injuries to student-athletes, because they may have to go out there and play more games in a sport that’s already violent.

If this passes, it likely won’t achieve the goals that the playoff organizers and schools say it will. But we know what the real motive is here.

Luckily for the fans, this could give us some more entertaining playoff games but it likely won’t change the overall outcome. You’ll see that the traditional best teams with the best talent win.

 And speaking of NIL laws:

https://www.indystar.com/story/sports/college/indiana/2021/06/11/indiana-legislature-name-image-likeness-laws-notre-dame-purdue-iu/7598879002/

Quote

Late last month, flanked by Ohio State Athletic Director Gene Smith, Ohio state Senator Niraj Antani announced the introduction of a state-level bill meant to legalize the ability for college athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness (NIL).

“As a graduate of the Ohio State University,” Antani said, standing at an Ohio State-branded lectern, “I saw how hard student-athletes worked both on their academics and their sport of choice. Since that time at Ohio State, I strongly believe students have an inherent right of their name, image and likeness.”

The visual was striking, its message crystal clear: The biggest state institution in Ohio, and almost certainly the most politically powerful of the Big Ten’s 14 schools, was throwing its weight behind the push for NIL legislation in its state.

 

Antani’s announcement moved Ohio into a group of 40 states somewhere between considering and having passed NIL legislation. Ohio was also the ninth of 11 states in the Big Ten footprint to join that list.

The only remaining outsiders? Wisconsin is one.

The other is Indiana, where schools are gearing up for the arrival of NIL into college athletics while there appears to be no serious appetite for state-level legislation governing it.

....

Elsewhere in the state, Notre Dame is preparing as well, with Athletic Director Jack Swarbrick publicly supportive of name, image and likeness reforms on the basis that athletes should be treated like any other student at the university.

Broadly, there are concerns around NIL turning into a recruiting weapon in big-dollar sports, increasing the already noticeable gap between the richest athletic departments and their less-moneyed counterparts, in addition to raising wider Title IX issues and more. But the consensus is it’s coming, and those best prepared for it are likely to benefit most. Or at very least, earliest.

...

But on both sides of the aisle, there appears to be an appetite for solving this problem at the national level, something the NCAA would appear to welcome.

 

So, too, would the Power Five conferences — the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, SEC and Pac-12 — who released a statement after Wednesday’s hearings expressing concern about “patchwork” state laws they fear could disadvantage schools in states without NIL legislation, or with legislation more restrictive than in other parts of the country.

“Only Congress can pass a national solution for student-athlete NIL rights,” the statement, released by all five conferences in concert, read. “The patchwork of state laws that begins on July 1 will disadvantage student-athletes in some states and create an unworkable system for others. As leaders in college athletics, we support extending NIL rights in a way that supports the educational opportunities of all student-athletes, including collegians in Olympic sports who comprised 80% of Team USA at the Rio games. We continue to work with Congress to develop a solution for NIL and expand opportunities.”

That might be the only widely accepted way this happens. As it stands, it appears to be the only way Indiana will come under the blanket of NIL legislation. There exists no tangible energy toward it within state government.

“I think the ball is in the colleges’ court at this time,” Dvorak said, “They need to come together and find a solution for themselves, because if they don’t, one is going to be imposed on them. I don’t know where that will come from, but nobody will be happy with that either.

“If it gets bad enough, it’s something we’ll have to do, and no one’s going to be happy about that.”

Collective ambivalence, to be fair, does not place Indiana in uncomfortable company.

Any reforms the NCAA passes appear likely to be stricter than many state laws on the books, presenting potential legal issues, and a federal solution remains wedged in the legislative process for now.

Even the conferences that took it upon themselves to release that joint statement Wednesday, who unironically referred to themselves as “the Autonomous Five,” eagerly encouraged Congress to find a blanket solution to their problem.

Everyone, it seems, would prefer someone else solve this not-at-all-new problem.

 

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4 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Yep.  Sadly, always has and always will.

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23 hours ago, Bobref said:

I’d rather see a B1G team than Stanford. They already play USC from the PAC 10. If they go to a schedule where they can only play 4 non-cons a season, I think Stanford is odd man out.

Would ND consider rotating between Stanford and USC?

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One of the biggest benefits to come from this expansion as it might finally dilute some of the stockpiling of talent we are seeing at the Top 5 schools.  

More schools will get in on a shot at a title, or at least an opportunity to play in the post season.  That may be enough to flip some Alabama recruits to MIss State or Kentucky or some Clemson recruits to Syracuse or NC State.  

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47 minutes ago, DT said:

Would ND consider rotating between Stanford and USC?

My first thought is that USC, like Navy, will be a fixture on any ND schedule. I don’t see that changing unless and until Stanford replaces USC as the premier program in the West.

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45 minutes ago, DT said:

One of the biggest benefits to come from this expansion as it might finally dilute some of the stockpiling of talent we are seeing at the Top 5 schools.

And this is the biggest plus of a 12 team tournament. Right now, Bama, Clemson, OSU have a huge recruiting advantage by telling recruits they’ll be in the playoff virtually every year. Expand to 12, and the top tier talent might well start to trickle down to the 2nd tier programs that had little prospect of anything other than occasionally appearing there when the stars align. Now, however, out of the 12 slots, probably 6 or so will go to perennial qualifiers, who were not able to break into the top 4 on a consistent basis.

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6 hours ago, Bobref said:

And this is the biggest plus of a 12 team tournament. Right now, Bama, Clemson, OSU have a huge recruiting advantage by telling recruits they’ll be in the playoff virtually every year. Expand to 12, and the top tier talent might well start to trickle down to the 2nd tier programs that had little prospect of anything other than occasionally appearing there when the stars align. Now, however, out of the 12 slots, probably 6 or so will go to perennial qualifiers, who were not able to break into the top 4 on a consistent basis.

Gonna be interesting. Think these “elite” FB schools have the bells and whistles now…..watch what they do to separate themselves from the others to widen the gap. 

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14 hours ago, DE said:

Gonna be interesting. Think these “elite” FB schools have the bells and whistles now…..watch what they do to separate themselves from the others to widen the gap. 

I’m wondering what these programs could do in the way of “athlete amenities “ that they’re not already doing. https://www.businessinsider.com/photos-clemsons-football-facility-2017-10

I believe the next level of “athlete amenities” will be schools lining up people to compensate their athletes for their image and likeness. Having a great locker room facility is attractive … but not as attractive as cash in your pocket. And it’s all legal.

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2 hours ago, Bobref said:

I’m wondering what these programs could do in the way of “athlete amenities “ that they’re not already doing. https://www.businessinsider.com/photos-clemsons-football-facility-2017-10

I believe the next level of “athlete amenities” will be schools lining up people to compensate their athletes for their image and likeness. Having a great locker room facility is attractive … but not as attractive as cash in your pocket. And it’s all legal.

Ding-Ding-DING!

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4 hours ago, Bobref said:

I’m wondering what these programs could do in the way of “athlete amenities “ that they’re not already doing. https://www.businessinsider.com/photos-clemsons-football-facility-2017-10

I believe the next level of “athlete amenities” will be schools lining up people to compensate their athletes for their image and likeness. Having a great locker room facility is attractive … but not as attractive as cash in your pocket. And it’s all legal.

In your opinion, would this widen the gap between the "haves" (huge alumni base/money pool/etc.) and the "have nots"?  I think so.

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4 hours ago, Bobref said:

I’m wondering what these programs could do in the way of “athlete amenities “ that they’re not already doing. https://www.businessinsider.com/photos-clemsons-football-facility-2017-10

I believe the next level of “athlete amenities” will be schools lining up people to compensate their athletes for their image and likeness. Having a great locker room facility is attractive … but not as attractive as cash in your pocket. And it’s all legal.

BTW......they had me at wiffle ball field.  If you have ever played it, you know.

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