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Lets follow the Oklahoma Model / Split 6A in 6A1 and 6A2


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10 hours ago, Donnie Baker said:

Thanks Grovers. Your point is also what I was trying to say. How far do we go to make it “fair “ for the big schools. 

Most of the complainers don’t want it fair. They just want to remove the teams they can’t beat. 

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9 minutes ago, DE said:

Nope. Wheatfield. It is in northern Jasper County (NW part of the state). 

😉 I know, I was kidding. Wheatland is (well... WAS) synonymous with a guaranteed memorable time back my younger days. Nothing too terrible. But never anything that was a great idea, in hindsight...

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On 12/29/2021 at 12:38 AM, HHF said:

When the IHSAA created the 6th class, there were 4 schools with 3000 plus enrollment :

Carmel

Ben Davis

North Central

Warren Central

Today, there are 11 schools with plus 3000 enrollment 

HSE

Fishers

Noblesville

Penn

Lake Central

Avon

Pike

 

 

Crown Point, Franklin Central, Brownsburg, Elkhart  and Center Grove are all within 200 students of breaking 3000.

So, theoretically, you have "16" mega schools, using 3000 as the "mega" cutoff.  There is your 6A1 class 

 

 

Wonder if those “mega” schools can put together a football roster the size of Cathedral’s?? 
😉

Edited by Bash Riprock
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10 hours ago, Esso Ayche said:

😉 I know, I was kidding. Wheatland is (well... WAS) synonymous with a guaranteed memorable time back my younger days. Nothing too terrible. But never anything that was a great idea, in hindsight...

gotcha

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On 12/30/2021 at 9:09 AM, temptation said:

Where do they fall short?

I think "fall short" was an inelegant way for me to conclude that point.

I think there are any number of factors that reduce a program's ability to compete, but relative enrollment among the 6A schools would be at the very bottom of my list.

You often draw attention to SES--free and reduced lunch numbers, specifically--and that is a factor that can only be ignored by the obtuse. 

The idea of reducing 6A into two separate classes based on enrollment would do nothing to change the fact that the best football is played in the Indianapolis area, and programs--especially those in suburban Indianapolis--there are in a position of relative strength when compared with 6A programs outside of the Indianapolis metro area. They would be if they only had 2000-2500 students now that the competitive environment is built up the way that it has.

Edited by PDB26
formatting issue
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1 hour ago, PDB26 said:

I think "fall short" was an inelegant way for me to conclude that point.

I think there are any number of factors that reduce a program's ability to compete, but relative enrollment among the 6A schools would be at the very bottom of my list.

You often draw attention to SES--free and reduced lunch numbers, specifically--and that is a factor that can only be ignored by the obtuse. 

The idea of reducing 6A into two separate classes based on enrollment would do nothing to change the fact that the best football is played in the Indianapolis area, and programs--especially those in suburban Indianapolis--there are in a position of relative strength when compared with 6A programs outside of the Indianapolis metro area. They would be if they only had 2000-2500 students now that the competitive environment is built up the way that it has.

Obtuse is putting it gently.  It’s suburban/rural folks who are too far removed from the reality that is urban education.

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14 hours ago, temptation said:

Obtuse is putting it gently.  It’s suburban/rural folks who are too far removed from the reality that is urban education.

There are certainly some rural areas that look a lot like some urban areas too with regards issues tied to impoverishment.  Crime might be different, to an extent ... although not always, but employment issues, lack of general opportunities, lack of area resources and support,  being "locked in" to a bad situation around you, etc. can also impact rural areas too.  This was especially true in areas of Texas when I lived there and even today.

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