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The Gridiron Digest

High Coaching Turnover A Real Concern - Impacts Competitive Balance


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42 minutes ago, Bobref said:

I think parents/fans getting out of hand at a youth game is an issue that should be handled at a league administrative level. In high school, it’s game management, usually an AD or assistant AD. In my experience, they are very willing to assume responsibility for addressing those matters.

I don't disagree and those are handled in that fashion.  But usually when admin gets involved, it was already an issue.  I am trying to think of ways to prevent things from getting to that level, and that is with a warning so the coach can nip it in the bud.  But thanks for your thoughts.

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3 hours ago, Bash Riprock said:

Thanks Bob...great explanation.  Could you get comfortable expanding the use of sideline warning in youth football to a  coach for to help prevent parents, family and other fans from "getting out of hand" as a method to help him own accountability to deal with the issue?  As you know, there is sometimes little space between and official and Mommy/Daddy just off the sidelines constantly yelling.  Thoughts??

I no longer work youth football where parents are allowed near the field. Basically only leagues played on HS fields with the parents in the stand. 

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6 hours ago, Bobref said:

That is not the purpose of a sideline warning in football, and it shouldn’t be used “off label” in that fashion. A sideline warning is given when the coach is out of his designated position: either in the restricted area when the ball is dead, or behind the restraining line when it’s alive. A coach coming on to the field to argue a call is one of the specific instances of unsportsmanlike conduct by a nonplayer found in the rule book. When I was wearing the white hat, they could bark all they wanted (within reason) as long as they stayed where they were supposed to be. Crossing the sideline to complain, however, was dealt with swiftly and decisively.

Thanks for the explanation. Thinking back I am sure one of the designated/restricted areas was what drew the flags and not simply the argument. 

Since both can happen simultaneously, it’s easy to assume from the stands it was the yelling.

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I was quick to bitch about the current state of affairs, I thought I might share a little glimpse of the reason you do it. 
 

Last night I had the pleasure to work a game where the HC was a kid I’ve had a relationship since she was about 8. I coached her in HS, saw her play a lot of games in college, as she was in the same conference as my daughter. She’s currently serving as interim HC as the HC has had some health issues. She is expected to be named HC. One of the highlights of my career was being able to shake her hand at the plate meeting and refer to her as coach. 
 

I think the best way for me to sum up the current state of affairs is, sports to me has always been about relationships. The main problem as I see it is the toxicity involved doesn’t foster the creation of relationships. Coaches, officials, and parents need to figure out, everyone is here for the same reason, and ultimately it will be the kids who suffer if we continue down this path. 
 

 

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3 hours ago, Impartial_Observer said:

I was quick to bitch about the current state of affairs, I thought I might share a little glimpse of the reason you do it. 
 

Last night I had the pleasure to work a game where the HC was a kid I’ve had a relationship since she was about 8. I coached her in HS, saw her play a lot of games in college, as she was in the same conference as my daughter. She’s currently serving as interim HC as the HC has had some health issues. She is expected to be named HC. One of the highlights of my career was being able to shake her hand at the plate meeting and refer to her as coach. 
 

I think the best way for me to sum up the current state of affairs is, sports to me has always been about relationships. The main problem as I see it is the toxicity involved doesn’t foster the creation of relationships. Coaches, officials, and parents need to figure out, everyone is here for the same reason, and ultimately it will be the kids who suffer if we continue down this path. 
 

 

To add to this, I think there is a connection between what we are seeing as far as the toxic stuff and the stuff we are dealing with in our schools with the same types of behaviors. 

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Just a reminder, this is high school football. One community's kids lining up against another community's kids. There has NEVER been "competitive balance" and it is not (much to DT's chagrin, I'm sure) the IHSAA's goal to ensure "competitive balance." 

There will always be haves and have-nots, and sometimes, they cycle, even in football-crazed communities like Sheridan and New Palestine where there's the occasional down year ... and sometimes, long-moribund programs put together a great year ... and most will be in the middle. But there's really no such thing as competitive balance in high school sports. 

Coaching turnover has been an issue since the leather helmet days. We read more about it now because we have access to statewide info, but we've always seen a lot of coaching turnover - either from coaches going to bigger programs or getting the boot for not winning enough. Now, we're seeing coaches leave head coaching jobs for assistant jobs and/or leaving the profession entirely. A decade ago, it was in part because teaching jobs were hard to find and we had a lot of lay coaches or coaches who taught in a different building than where they coached. Now, that's not as big of an issue, but there's always a lot of churn. 

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15 hours ago, crimsonace1 said:

Just a reminder, this is high school football. One community's kids lining up against another community's kids. There has NEVER been "competitive balance" and it is not (much to DT's chagrin, I'm sure) the IHSAA's goal to ensure "competitive balance." 

There will always be haves and have-nots, and sometimes, they cycle, even in football-crazed communities like Sheridan and New Palestine where there's the occasional down year ... and sometimes, long-moribund programs put together a great year ... and most will be in the middle. But there's really no such thing as competitive balance in high school sports. 

Coaching turnover has been an issue since the leather helmet days. We read more about it now because we have access to statewide info, but we've always seen a lot of coaching turnover - either from coaches going to bigger programs or getting the boot for not winning enough. Now, we're seeing coaches leave head coaching jobs for assistant jobs and/or leaving the profession entirely. A decade ago, it was in part because teaching jobs were hard to find and we had a lot of lay coaches or coaches who taught in a different building than where they coached. Now, that's not as big of an issue, but there's always a lot of churn. 

The churn level is increasing.

The following are all measures used to support the drive for competitive balance :

Conferences

Enrollment based classifications.

Success Factor

Running Clock

Travel Rule

Transfer Rule

 

 

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