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DrivenT

Bro Culture Gets out of Hand

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I thought your bro culture had something to do with how coaches interact with their players. This was a fight. How is this the same thing?

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14 minutes ago, JQWL said:

I thought your bro culture had something to do with how coaches interact with their players. This was a fight. How is this the same thing?

It's not, it's just a part of DT's "shock" journalism style.

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The ' bro culture" starts with the players.  The participation of the coaching staff is an unintended and unfortunate consequence.

 

 

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10 hours ago, JQWL said:

I thought your bro culture had something to do with how coaches interact with their players. This was a fight. How is this the same thing?

Spot on... 

Was thinking this the entire time I watched the video.  I was waiting for coaches to chest bump their players after the fight!

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Starts with a chest bump....then a fist bump...then a fist punch...clear link to "bro culture"  :02_v:

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To continue this pattern of labeling things as part of a "bro culture" seems so irresponsible to me.  These are players who stepped out of line.  There is absolutely no understanding here of the relationship between player and coach, and in fact there is no background information given here at all.  Every coach that I see in this video is pulling a player out of the mix.  Clearly DT you have some type of agenda to push here.  If you have specific examples of this culture that you believe is running rampant and ruining the game, please give them, but I for one am tired of the passive aggressive nature in which you are attacking the coaching profession. 

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I would add it overlooks the fact there were more kids trying to pull their teammates away than there were players actually fighting.

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4 minutes ago, Irishman said:

I would add it overlooks the fact there were more kids trying to pull their teammates away than there were players actually fighting.

Did anyone see that little dude on the right of the screen punching someones helmet?????????  Have these people learned nothing?  have fun.  break YOUR hand and ill be fine.  

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#11 in white gets snuck on and the kid in black literally runs through the crowd to hide :04_v:

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3 hours ago, eschnur66 said:

To continue this pattern of labeling things as part of a "bro culture" seems so irresponsible to me.  These are players who stepped out of line.  There is absolutely no understanding here of the relationship between player and coach, and in fact there is no background information given here at all.  Every coach that I see in this video is pulling a player out of the mix.  Clearly DT you have some type of agenda to push here.  If you have specific examples of this culture that you believe is running rampant and ruining the game, please give them, but I for one am tired of the passive aggressive nature in which you are attacking the coaching profession. 

Its very simple

I'm an old school traditionalist and I don't like the new culture that has infected the game at all levels.  Neither do the millions who have tuned out to NFL broadcasts and the countless others who no longer participate nor attend games live in person.

If you are not aware of these trends, then you simply are not paying attention.

I am using this platform to express my discontent with the direction of the game and to speak for those who don't have a voice on this forum or others like it.

 

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1 hour ago, DrivenT said:

Its very simple

I'm an old school traditionalist and I don't like the new culture that has infected the game at all levels.  Neither do the millions who have tuned out to NFL broadcasts and the countless others who no longer participate nor attend games live in person.

If you are not aware of these trends, then you simply are not paying attention.

I am using this platform to express my discontent with the direction of the game and to speak for those who don't have a voice on this forum or others like it.

 

We know exactly what you mean by bro culture and who you voted for president.

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1 hour ago, DrivenT said:

Its very simple

I'm an old school traditionalist and I don't like the new culture that has infected the game at all levels.  Neither do the millions who have tuned out to NFL broadcasts and the countless others who no longer participate nor attend games live in person.

If you are not aware of these trends, then you simply are not paying attention.

I am using this platform to express my discontent with the direction of the game and to speak for those who don't have a voice on this forum or others like it.

 

If you are not aware of the fact that you are watching (or choosing not to watch) some of the highest quality football there has ever been at all levels of the game then you my friend are not paying attention. If actually building meaningful relationships with your players and being able to relate to them is seen as "bro culture" then I am as bro as they come. Just because you don't like something does not make it an infection of the game. I will also use this platform to continue to refute the notion that what you call "bro culture" is negatively impacting the game.

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4 hours ago, bruno_LA said:

We know exactly what you mean by bro culture and who you voted for president.

I bet he voted for Roseanne Barr.

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8 hours ago, bruno_LA said:

We know exactly what you mean by bro culture and who you voted for president.

Typical weak response that you would normally find on a CNN/MSNBC forum. A liberal response based on half truths and false accusations. Instead of finding solutions to problems let's label every conservative or voter for our current President as racist, sexist, or ignorant. No solutions just mud-slinging. 

I don't agree with DrivenT that this ridiculous fight has anything to do with the "bro culture" that we hear so much about. However, I'm also not going to blame all of the ills of society on Our President.  Ask people in the military if they like Our President. Has anyone paid attention to the stock market over the past year. I'm personally looking forward to a tax decrease next month. We need free thinkers in this country and not sheep who take CNN/Fox News/MSNBC for their so-called expert opinions.

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On 1/9/2018 at 6:25 PM, DrivenT said:

 

9 hours ago, DrivenT said:

Its very simple

I'm an old school traditionalist and I don't like the new culture that has infected the game at all levels.  Neither do the millions who have tuned out to NFL broadcasts and the countless others who no longer participate nor attend games live in person.

If you are not aware of these trends, then you simply are not paying attention.

I am using this platform to express my discontent with the direction of the game and to speak for those who don't have a voice on this forum or others like it.

 

Here's one that pretty traditionalist from 30+ years ago and has, as head coaches Ditka and Stallings.

 

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1 hour ago, foxbat said:

 

Here's one that pretty traditionalist from 30+ years ago and has, as head coaches Ditka and Stallings.

 

Whaaaaat???

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Anyone else notice the instance in the National Championship game where the "greatest college coach of all time" has a player (#48) punch a Georgia player in the facemask (genius), then go after an assistant coach on the Alabama sideline that is reprimanding him for being an *Deleted*, has to be restrained by teammates/coaches, but yet goes down and makes the tackle on the next kickoff.  Boy the "greatest college coach of all time" really showed him.

 

Not to mention the more this "bro culture" gets blasted on youtube, social media, or ESPN/tv networks, it isnt going away.  Maybe they should get some of the blame.

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9 hours ago, foxbat said:

 

Here's one that pretty traditionalist from 30+ years ago and has, as head coaches Ditka and Stallings.

 

Cheap shot by 48 from the Cardinals.  Then ole Keith Van Horne w a cheap shot in retaliation.

Anyone else remember how big those dudes seemed THEN and now look at how big the guys are now?

Bortz and VH looked like (body wise) HS All Americans of today.

Also, anyone see Jimbo Covert's block on the ensuing play?  LOVE that type of fb.

***UA AA Game had and OL that was reported at 6'8"- 400 lbs. and could move!

Edited by Coach Ellenwood

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I just finished up my 16th year as an assistant but I consider myself relatively young.  If anyone knows me, I am definitely an old school coach when it comes to my approach.   I am a blue collar guy, my dad was a mill worker of 38 years, and you can bet I got my behind kicked once or twice.  With that being said, I understand that not all kids respond to the same approach.  Some kids you can coach hard, some you can't.  There are kids whose face I may get in and to get my point across, others I'll talk to on the side - whatever it takes.  I have fist-bumped, did that jump and hit each other's back thing, high-fived, hugged, etc with my players.  If that means I am a contributor to the "bro culture", then so be it.  

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3 hours ago, valleySTRENGTH said:

Anyone else notice the instance in the National Championship game where the "greatest college coach of all time" has a player (#48) punch a Georgia player in the facemask (genius), then go after an assistant coach on the Alabama sideline that is reprimanding him for being an *Deleted*, has to be restrained by teammates/coaches, but yet goes down and makes the tackle on the next kickoff.  Boy the "greatest college coach of all time" really showed him.

 

Not to mention the more this "bro culture" gets blasted on youtube, social media, or ESPN/tv networks, it isnt going away.  Maybe they should get some of the blame.

Seen this, and thought I was watching "last chance u". But I don't think the coaching staff at EMCC would have allowed him back in the game after he tried to attack a coach.

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I think the problem with this discussion starts at its foundation. It never started as a serious discussion.

There are clearly coaches, who have crossed professional lines in their relationship with their players. Some coaches have built relationship with players in order to enhance their own personal ego for self-satisfaction. This group of coaches tries to use the player to fill a void in their own self worth. At the extreme levels you see a coach who may coach who invites a player over to play video games as  a way to engage in inappropriate conversations. Maybe the coach joins in bad mouthing other coaches or teachers in the community. Far worse maybe the coach buys the student athlete alcohol or tobacco products. These things happen. They are terrible. They clearly cross a professional line. But I also think the coaches that participate in these behaviors are a small minority population in our profession. (If this is "Bro Culture," I agree we have a problem.)

On the flip side you have coaches that do things to build relationships with players in order to get that player to achieve their personal best. The goal is always to garner buy-in from the player to fulfill both personal and team goals. Maybe the coach has a Madden tournament as a team function. Maybe the team goes bowling together. Maybe the coach creates a catchy phrase or break-down  the team does a rallying cry.  Maybe the players come up with a funny dance they do after a big play and the coach does it in a crucial moment in a big game to let him know he is on the same page as them. Maybe coaches do a number of things that one would find silly or obnoxious or whatever but are completely within professional boundaries. (If this is "Bro Culture" then I think we are overlooking a lot of good in the game.)

The actions of coaches with good intentions that do not cross professional lines should not be criticized. I am an old school guy. I didn't chest bump guys when I started coaching at the age of 21. I don't do it now at the age of 35. And I still won't do it if I am still kicking and coaching at 71. But that's a matter of taste. And the interactions between coaches and players that are both well-intentioned and within professional guidelines should not be judged by outsiders based on personal taste or preference. 

I hate mayonnaise, I want absolutely no part of it in my life, but I wouldn't contend it is leading to the ruination of the sandwich world. 

 

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14 hours ago, Kamikaze said:

Typical weak response that you would normally find on a CNN/MSNBC forum. A liberal response based on half truths and false accusations. Instead of finding solutions to problems let's label every conservative or voter for our current President as racist, sexist, or ignorant. No solutions just mud-slinging. 

I don't agree with DrivenT that this ridiculous fight has anything to do with the "bro culture" that we hear so much about. However, I'm also not going to blame all of the ills of society on Our President.  Ask people in the military if they like Our President. Has anyone paid attention to the stock market over the past year. I'm personally looking forward to a tax decrease next month. We need free thinkers in this country and not sheep who take CNN/Fox News/MSNBC for their so-called expert opinions.

Funny you you call CNN/MSNBC half truths when everything you said about the president is documented and TRUE.  I guess the Mueller indictments are half true as well. You will only enjoy the tax break this year while the rest of us pay for it over the next 10.  Get your facts straight.

Back on point the changing culture "bro " or whatever is dangerous because their is less and less of a line between player and coach and it apparent at evey level. 

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29 minutes ago, bucksfan said:

Funny you you call CNN/MSNBC half truths when everything you said about the president is documented and TRUE.  I guess the Mueller indictments are half true as well. You will only enjoy the tax break this year while the rest of us pay for it over the next 10.  Get your facts straight.

Back on point the changing culture "bro " or whatever is dangerous because their is less and less of a line between player and coach and it apparent at evey level. 

 A debate that can't be won and probably shouldn't be part of a high school football forum. We will all see how important the Mueller investigation is soon. It could bring some big news when it's all said and done, but I'm guessing it's nothing more than a little bit of smoke without the fire that some expect. We'll all see soon. Your opinion on the tax break is obviously different than mine, but your brief explanation doesn't prove that you have your facts straight and that mine are wrong. I don't agree that your comment is correct

By the way, I agree with you that the line between coaches and players has become increasingly thin. Social media, family structures, and parents making excuses for their kids, even when their kids are in the wrong, are major reasons for this.

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