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Muda69

The New Normal, round 2

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Pledge of Allegiance recitation banned by Michigan university student government: https://www.foxnews.com/media/pledge-banned-student-government-michigan-university-campus

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Student government leaders at a Michigan university axed the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance from their meetings last week after deeming the verbiage to be non-inclusive.

Video obtained by Campus Reform showed the Grand Valley State University student senate discussing the vote after weeks of debate.

Students who backed the initiative scrapping the Pledge reportedly took issue with the mention of the word "God."

"I have no allegiance to pledge to the Federal Government as someone who feels entirely unsupported by its figurehead," one student said.

"The lack of respect and empathy for the greater student body hurts my heart," another added.

Appearing on "Fox & Friends: First" Tuesday with hosts Jillian Mele and Rob Schmitt, Campus Reform Editor-in-Chief Cabot Phillips said it was "disappointing to see students come out and say that the Pledge of Allegiance represents an oppressive government in their words."

Phillips said, just "the fact that they have the privilege to go out and say just how oppressive our government is, shows how wonderful our country is in the first place, that you can criticize our government without having to have any fear of retribution."

"And, ironically, they don't see their own privilege in that statement," he exclaimed. "They don't see their American privilege. The fact that globally it's not a common thing to be able to criticize your own government."

...

Why is the Pledge of Allegiance SOP at many meeting, gatherings, etc. in the first place?

 

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Purdue’s Mitch Daniels, after calling black scholar ‘rarest creature,’ says he’s ‘misunderstood’: https://www.jconline.com/story/news/2019/11/23/purdues-mitch-daniels-after-calling-black-scholar-rarest-creature-says-hes-misunderstood/4275353002/

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 As social media hashtags piled up and he was called out by faculty on the University Senate late last week for referring to a black scholar as “one of the rarest creatures in America” and the “rarest phenomenon,” Purdue President Mitch Daniels said he felt his comments were being treated unfairly.

“I’ve never felt so misunderstood before,” Daniels told the J&C, after comments he made in an impromptu conversation with students Wednesday night in Pfendler Hall spread across campus.

“I was saying that, this very week, we’re working on a superstar who happens to be African American,” Daniels said. “Extraordinarily rare talent and one of our target populations. That’s what I said. And to have that stood on its head as an indifference to diversity, or worse, it hurts. That’s all I’ll say.”

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The exchange between students happened Wednesday night, outside a Purdue Student Government meeting. That night, Daniels had been pressed by students about his administration’s response after a Purdue student had been denied the sale of cold medicine because a clerk and a manager at an off-campus CVS Pharmacy across from Mackey Arena had rejected his Puerto Rican driver’s license as sufficient ID.

That incident, in late October, led to student protests demanding that Daniels address concerns of minority students.

 

As reported by the Exponent, several students asked Daniels to continue the conversation in one of Pfendler’s hallways. The question they posed, as posted in a recording by the Exponent, looked to distill Daniels’ contention that there was always room for improvement on the diversity front: What specifically was the university doing?

Daniels pointed to the Purdue Polytechnic high schools, two charter schools in the Indianapolis Public Schools district. He said a third Purdue-led high school is in the works.

“Why? Because we cannot find enough minority students. The school system in this state is not producing them,” Daniels said that night. “It’s my initiative. … We are building our own pipeline. That’s one thing we can do.”

He talked about recruiting students, including making personal calls during enrollment season to personally encourage minority students to choose Purdue.

“Everybody’s chasing the same small pool,” Daniels told the students. “You are exceptional students, or you wouldn’t be here. And you all had other choices.”

And, in the part that wound up bringing headlines on campus, Daniels talked about recruiting minority faculty.

“At the end of this week, I’ll be recruiting one of the rarest creatures in America – a leading, I mean a really leading, African-American scholar,” Daniels said that night.

The moment was met with murmurs. D’Yan Berry, president of the Black Student Union, can be heard on the recording: “Creatures? Come on.”

“It’s a figure of speech. You must have taken some, you know, literature,” Daniels responded. “Let me say, rarest birds. Rarest phenomenon.”

The backlash came quickly, including an extended post from Berry that was still picking up steam on Twitter heading into the weekend. Part of Berry’s post: “I am disappointed but not at all surprised by his reference – in front of a group of mostly black, minority students – to black students as creatures. It afflicts me that this is how he speaks even when ‘boasting’ on students.”

On Friday, Daniels said he believed he was being judged on “one word out of an hour” as he spoke about the recruiting minority faculty. He pointed to articles in national press that outlined the competition for minority professors.

One, published in The Atlantic in April 2019, outlined statistics that fewer than 6 percent of full-time faculty in U.S. universities are black. (The article also rounds up a slew of reasons why, including research about broken pipelines to universities – particularly to Ph.D. degree programs – and other ways minorities are discouraged from pursuing faculty positions.)

At Purdue, 161 of 1,931 – or 8.3 percent – tenured or tenure track professors were categorized as underrepresented minorities in 2018, according to data published online by the university. That compares to 117 or 1,849 – or 6.3 percent – in the same category in 2013, the year Daniels arrived on campus.

“I’m saying what hundreds of people have said,” Daniels said. “It’s a bit ironic, given all this, that this week, I was in the process of working on (a professor) that’s just stellar, quite apart from ethnicity. I mean, that was my point. They’re all long shots, because everyone wants them on their campuses. I feel very passionate about that.”

Could Daniels have avoided Wednesday night’s fallout by speaking up about the CVS incident from the start?

“I accept that some folks think that was a misjudgment,” Daniels said.

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Yet another college liberal looking to be "outraged" about something.  How about actually you know, concentrating on your classes and your education,  supposedly the reason you decided to enroll at a fine institution like Purdue University in the first place?

 

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29 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

Purdue’s Mitch Daniels, after calling black scholar ‘rarest creature,’ says he’s ‘misunderstood’: https://www.jconline.com/story/news/2019/11/23/purdues-mitch-daniels-after-calling-black-scholar-rarest-creature-says-hes-misunderstood/4275353002/

Yet another college liberal looking to be "outraged" about something.  How about actually you know, concentrating on your classes and your education,  supposedly the reason you decided to enroll at a fine institution like Purdue University in the first place?

 

Daniels deserves all the flak he receives for a bonehead statement like that.

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3 minutes ago, swordfish said:

I GUESS "SLOTS AND TABS" WOULD BE THE NEW NORMAL.....

Image may contain: 1 person, text

That PPE would get you fired in most places today. She wouldn't have to worry about it very long dressed like that.

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On 11/25/2019 at 3:57 PM, gonzoron said:

Daniels deserves all the flak he receives for a bonehead statement like that.

Purdue prof: 'Misunderstood' Mitch Daniels' track record should buy him grace: https://www.jconline.com/story/news/opinion/letters/2019/12/01/purdue-prof-misunderstood-mitch-daniels-track-record-should-buy-him-grace/4349334002/

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Recently, I read the controversy regarding Purdue President Mitch Daniels’ statement and his explanation of being misunderstood. ("Purdue’s Mitch Daniels, after calling black scholar ‘rarest creature,’ says he’s ‘misunderstood,' J&C, Nov. 23.)

I wonder how many of us have made statements that have been misunderstood or taken out of context or wish we could take back. While being politically and socially correct is critical in today’s society, it is important to review the track record of a person and the culture of the institution before casting stones.

After spending my academic career at several other academic institutions, I was offered the privilege to join Purdue, where I serve as a professor and endowed chair in the School of Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis in renewable energy.  I decided to join the Purdue family because of its commitment to diversity and inclusion.

The university’s principles aligned with what I had been working toward for more than 20 years: to open opportunities for women, minorities and first-generation college students while sustaining an active research program. My recent fellowship at the American Physical Society reads: “For demonstrating the importance of the initial conditions of scaling arguments in turbulent boundary layers, and for demonstrating the importance of turbulence in wind energy, and for mentoring and creating new opportunities for under-represented minorities in fluid dynamics.”

In my opinion, diversity of ideas, ethnicity, gender, social political views and economic experience and perspective are essential for an academic institution, and are the key ingredients for growth and innovation.

As we consider with pride that Purdue is the home of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon; the home of the National Society of Black Engineers, the largest and premier society for black engineers in U.S; and a top 10 engineering school in the country, we should also see the evidence that President Daniels has improved the campus climate.  In fact, 2018’s SERU (Student Experience in the Research University) survey of students on multiple campuses asked a number of questions addressing the issue of “campus climate.”  Typical questions ask respondents to agree or disagree with statements such as “This is a welcoming campus,” “I feel comfortable with the campus climate,” “I feel valued as an individual on campus,” and “I would enroll here again.” Purdue respondents gave our campus the highest ranking across the peer group on a set of core climate measures, No. 1 on eight out of eight questions. 

Creating an inclusive environment is the responsibility of all of us.  A positive campus environment can help us develop new technologies, new science and train students who will become the next Neil Armstrong or Albert Einstein. About 32 years ago I relocated from Puerto Rico to New York to pursue my bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. As a black Hispanic, I can relate to issues of discrimination, harassment and disrespect.  As such, I can see firsthand challenges and areas we can all improve in academia.

To have an endowed professorship at a top 10 engineering school in the country is indeed an honor and represents a major commitment by Purdue toward inclusiveness and the need and desire to attract top scientists from underrepresented groups. For the first time in my career, I feel truly respected, not because I am black Hispanic or an endowed chair professor, but because of the work I do — people really want my opinion and encourage me to pursue big bold ideas. That aura is difficult to explain and even to replicate — but I genuinely feel happy that Purdue has created such a positive environment for a diverse population to achieve greatness.

When I see Purdue pushing hard to promote an environment of diversity and inclusion as stipulated in the Division of Diversity & Inclusion, it is clear to me that we are moving toward our land grant mission. When I see the presence and commitment of Purdue in Latin America, I am proud and  honored to be part of this institution.

Last year, I came out with an idea — a Bold Idea to help solve the problematic and polarized discussions about the wall with Mexico. Instead of a wall, we suggested building an energy-water corridor along the USA/Mexico border to create opportunities and help solve the situation with children in cages. This only happens in a place like Purdue where science and knowledge are pursued to the highest-level and bold, crazy ideas to address the world’s greatest challenges are encouraged and supported. This led to a consortium of major universities consisting of some of the best scientists in the country.

Although this was a very sensitive topic that nobody wanted to touch, President Daniels was on board from the very beginning to provide this alternative solution that could help the quality of life of many migrants.  His support has helped in getting attention in publications and interviews. In fact, he wrote a major article in the Washington Post and later conducted several interviews defending our bold idea and supporting the initiative as a means of opportunities for Hispanics, specifically along the USA/Mexico border.

In most institutions such bold ideas would not have been taken seriously, and worse, a university President would not have the courage to stand up for what is right — in this case, looking for a solution to a critical problem affecting Hispanics along the border. This is what a fair visionary leader did. I hope that as we continue to improve on diversity and inclusion, we take the time to look at his track record, hear him out and be fair.

Purdue is the only major institution where the cost and quality ratio is such that anyone can achieve the American Dream; and where students are not drowned with loan debts like in other universities — a serious initiative led by President Daniels.

As we continue to celebrate Purdue’s achievements during our 150 years with our students, staff, alumni, and  faculty, we hope to continue to promote excellence and seek the truth in a respectful manner celebrating our differences in an inclusive positive and safe environment.

If we take this opportunity to truly listen to each other, we can continue to create a unique academic institution where Big Ideas will transform our society for the better--- we put the first man on the moon and made history on many fronts.  Let us now solve cancer, aging, bring clean water to nearly 1 billion people, clean energy to developing countries, solve climate change and multiple other challenges while celebrating our differences in positive safe environment to nurture the next Steve Jobs or Marie Currie. Besides, who can dislike a President of a major university who rides a Harley?

 

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46 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

I'll stand with my opinion of Daniels and my original statement. It's exactly his track record that has formed my opinion.

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16 hours ago, gonzoron said:

I'll stand with my opinion of Daniels and my original statement. It's exactly his track record that has formed my opinion.

Can you please provide documented examples of this track record you speak of, during Mr. Daniel's tenure as president of Purdue University?

 

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1 hour ago, Muda69 said:

Can you please provide documented examples of this track record you speak of, during Mr. Daniel's tenure as president of Purdue University?

 

I think it is far more important to start with how he came to be President as much, if not more so than what he has done while he has been President. 

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2 hours ago, Irishman said:

I think it is far more important to start with how he came to be President as much, if not more so than what he has done while he has been President. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitch_Daniels#Controversy_over_selection

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The Purdue University Board of Trustees unanimously elected Mitch Daniels president of Purdue University on June 21, 2012. As governor, Daniels had appointed eight of the ten board members and had reappointed the other two, which critics claimed was a conflict of interest. A state investigation released in October 2012 found that the circumstances did not violate the Indiana Code of Ethics.[115] Other critics of his selection pointed out that, unlike previous Purdue presidents, he lacked a background in academia.[116] His term as president began upon completion of his term as governor in January 2013. In preparation for his term as President of Purdue University, Daniels stopped participating in partisan political activity during the 2012 election cycle and focused instead on issues related to higher education and fiscal matters.

In order to avoid the financial cost of a formal inauguration, Daniels instead wrote an "Open Letter to the People of Purdue" in which he documented the challenges facing higher education and outlined his initial priorities such as affordability, academic excellence and academic freedom.[117] Daniels has continued this practice, opting to send Open Letters to the Purdue community instead of giving a formal State of the University speech, as is more common in higher education.

So do believe Mr. Daniel's tenure as Purdue's president has been a successful one or a failure, regardless of the allegations of political patronage that led to his election? 

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Washington College Cancels Anti-Racist Play Because It Could 'Potentially Upset' Some People: https://reason.com/2019/12/03/washington-college-the-foreigner-censorship-students-kkk-racism/

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At Maryland's Washington College, the theater department attempted to stage a production of Larry Shue's The Foreigner, in which the bad guys are members of the Ku Klux Klan.

The play is thoroughly anti-racist, anti-KKK, and pro-immigrant. But Washington College's administration, worried that the production "could potentially upset some members of the campus community," cancelled it just two days before dress rehearsal. The College Fix's Troy Sargent reports that the decision was made by interim theater chair Laura Eckelman, with the support of the dean of the college.

The administration seeks to "balance the right of free speech with our values of inclusion and compassion," a spokesperson told The College Fix.

Student director Megan Stagg was not consulted in the decision to cancel the play.

The Elm, Washington College's student paper, notes that some students considered any depiction of the KKK—even a negative one—to be an endorsement of racism that would make marginalized members of campus feel unsafe. Several cast members were told that they were racist for appearing in such a play.

"Putting the KKK on stage in a satirical way is not appropriate because nothing about the historical and present day ramifications of the KKK is funny," Felicia Attor, secretary of diversity for the college's student government, told The Elm. "This is about acknowledging the need for all, not some, students to feel safe on this campus."

The administration evidently agreed with these concerns.

"The campus was not prepared for the content of the show, and the decision was made to be respectful of our student populations," said the spokesperson.

The decision might be respectful toward the censorial whims of a small number of activists, but it is certainly not respectful of the students who worked on the production for two years.

"This show is about giving a voice to the voiceless and we have been undermined and received hate for it through the cancelation," said cast member Will Reid, who had been set to lead a post-show panel discussion that would have explored the play's themes.

Washington College did not immediately return my request for comment.

This is a private college—indeed, it is one of the oldest liberal arts institutions in the country—and so the administration is within its rights to treat students like children who cannot possibly handle challenging material. But this is a sad indictment of the priorities of the modern college campus, where too many students have to submit to the preposterous idea that everyone must feel perfectly safe and shielded from emotional discomfort at all times.

I've long warned that the tactics of the intersectional left will get in the way of progressive social goals. (I even wrote a book about it.) What happened at Washington College is a perfect example: Criticizing racism in a way that depicts actual racists is now considered too traumatizing.

Yet another example of the complete pussification of most college campuses these days.  Students are nothing but snowflakes who will run for the hills or sit down and sob uncontrollably when faced with something the least bit "traumatizing".  Pitiful.   I fear for the future of America.

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Muda69 said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitch_Daniels#Controversy_over_selection

So do believe Mr. Daniel's tenure as Purdue's president has been a successful one or a failure, regardless of the allegations of political patronage that led to his election? 

I am not involved with that school enough to make a fair assessment of his performance. I do hear a lot of negative things and a lot of good things. I will leave the judgments up to those involved. That said, the use of the term when referring to the student was not a good choice of words. There are PLENTY of other ways to compliment the student’s achievements. 

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