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swordfish

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Everything posted by swordfish

  1. https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/media/chris-cuomo-racial-slur-video/index.html Chris Cuomo apologized after "Fredo" blow-up........ Should a Fredo apologize? Isn't their regret implied?
  2. Belongs in the Meme thread......with the other drivel......
  3. You do realize the flight manifests have been public ever since the pedo was re-arrested.......This isn't new....... I know you think the Angelic Clintons are certainly not capable of such a thing, but absolutely expected from the Devil Trump.....
  4. In reference to "You can try to deflect and be obtuse but he went to kill Mexicans and was clearly influenced by our very terrific Prez". He said his actions would be misunderstood as being tied to Trump. "My ideology has not changed for several years," Crusius wrote. "My opinions on automation, immigration, and the rest predate Trump and his campaign for president. I [am] putting this here because some people will blame the President or certain presidential candidates for the attack. This is not the case. I know that the media will probably call me a white supremacist anyway and blame Trump's rhetoric. The media is infamous for fake news. Their reaction to this attack will likely just confirm that." That was the only time Trump appeared in the manifesto, and it appears clear that Crusius borrowed his "fake news" characterization of the news media from the president. But that is not what Trump's critics have charged. They have charged that Trump inspired Crusius to kill. They have charged it so often in the last few days that it has hardened into a general perception that Crusius was inspired by the president. But read the manifesto. It's just not there.
  5. Gonzo and SF actually have to agree here. Although my 9mm double action semi-automatic handgun has the factory clip that holds 15. Add one in the chamber I would be carrying 16 shots. It's loaded with Hydra-shock hollow points. Not saying I need that many, I hope I never have to fire it in self defense, but if needed, given my years of range time, I should only need one. (Plan for the worst, hope for the best) Even though the manifesto specifically says different......
  6. OK - One more........ The same prison El Chapo was in......
  7. https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/11/politics/joe-biden-parkland-victims/index.html Washington (CNN)Joe Biden twice on Saturday said he met with students who survived the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, when he was vice president. But the Parkland shooting took place in February 2018, a little more than a year after Biden left office. The Democratic presidential hopeful -- who is far from the only politician to misspeak but has acknowledged he is a "gaffe machine" -- has a reputation for making misstatements on the campaign trail. His latest campaign gaffes came at a gun control forum in Des Moines, Iowa, when he described meeting survivors of the shooting that left 17 dead when they visited Washington to lobby for stricter gun laws. "I met with them and then they went off up on the Hill when I was vice president," Biden said at the forum. The former vice president made the same error later that day when he told reporters, "Those kids in Parkland came up to see me when I was vice president," while describing members of Congress ducking meetings with the students. Biden did meet with a group of Parkland survivors in 2018, but he did so after he left office. Another mass shooting -- in 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut -- took place while Biden served as vice president. A spokeswoman for Biden, Kate Bedingfield, on Sunday tweeted a link to a story about Biden meeting with the Parkland students in 2018, writing: "Wouldn't it be nice to have a president who consoles Americans in their time of need so often that he sometimes mistakes the timing? But even more so, wouldn't it be nice to have a president who will actually fight to prevent these tragedies?" The verbal stumble wasn't Biden's only misstep in Iowa, where a recent poll shows he maintains a lead over the rest of the Democratic field. Days prior, Biden said "poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids" -- which his campaign noted was an error he immediately corrected. He was speaking to a group of Hispanic and Asian voters in Iowa on Thursday when he said: "We have this notion that somehow if you're poor you cannot do it. Poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids -- wealthy kids, black kids, Asian kids. No, I really mean it, but think how we think about it." "They can do anything that anybody else can do, given a shot," Biden later added. On Saturday, Biden told reporters that people understood what he'd meant. Last week in Iowa, Biden also initially confused former British prime ministers Margaret Thatcherand Theresa May during a speech in which he recounted the international backlash to President Donald Trump's reaction to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. May was prime minister at the time, but while Biden appeared to immediately realize his mistake, he did not go on to name May. And during his soapbox speech at the Iowa State Fair, Biden also bungled his "we choose truth over lies" line, and said instead: "We choose truth over facts." I still contend he was put there just to take some of the momentum away from Sanders.......
  8. You have to realize that I don't care what his "motive" was. Your post had nothing to do with the topic of mass shootings and how do you keep guns from idiots like him, just a touch of the motive perpetuated by the New York Times headline "El Paso Shooting Suspect's Manifesto Echoes Trump's Language." https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columnists/has-anyone-actually-read-the-el-paso-manifesto Much discussion was spurred by an article in the New York Times with the headline, "El Paso Shooting Suspect's Manifesto Echoes Trump's Language." The story quoted just 28 words of the nearly 2,400-word manifesto. It noted that Crusius specifically wrote that his views "predate Trump." And it warned that "linking political speech, however heated, to the specific acts of ruthless mass killers is a fraught exercise." Nevertheless, the Times declared that even "if Mr. Trump did not originally inspire the gunman, he has brought into the mainstream polarizing ideas and people once consigned to the fringes of American society." First, to be clear: The manifesto is insane. Part of it discussed commonly debated issues such as the environment and the economy in ways that are well within the boundaries of political conversation going on today — indeed, that might have come out of the New York Times or many other outlets. Other parts of it mixed in theories on immigration from far right circles in Europe and the U.S. Then it threw in beliefs on "race-mixing" straight from the fever swamps. And then it concluded that the solution is to murder Hispanic immigrants, going on to debate whether an AK-47 or an AR-15 would best do the job. By that point, Crusius had veered far from both reality and basic humanity. But the question is, was he inspired by President Trump? It is hard to make that case looking at the manifesto in its entirety. Crusius worried about many things, if the manifesto is any indication. He certainly worried about immigration, but also about automation. About job losses. About a universal basic income. Oil drilling. Urban sprawl. Watersheds. Plastic waste. Paper waste. A blue Texas. College debt. Recycling. Healthcare. Sustainability. And more. Large portions of the manifesto simply could not be more un-Trumpian. Crusius began the manifesto by expressing support for Brenton Tarrant, the man who in March murdered 51 people and wounded 49 others in attacks on a mosque and an Islamic center in Christchurch, New Zealand. Tarrant wrote a 74-page manifesto entitled "The Great Replacement" that dwelled on demographic change in Europe, which Tarrant said was experiencing an "invasion" of immigrants with higher fertility rates than native Europeans. "This crisis of mass immigration and sub-replacement fertility is an assault on the European people that, if not combated, will ultimately result in the complete racial and cultural replacement of the European people," Tarrant wrote. Tarrant's writing deeply affected Crusius. The first words of Crusius' manifesto were, "In general, I support the Christchurch shooter and his manifesto." Crusius went on to write that, "This attack is a response to the Hispanic invasion* of Texas. ... I am simply defending my country from cultural and ethnic replacement brought on by an invasion." Later, Crusius referred to Hispanic immigrants as "invaders who also have close to the highest birthrate of all ethnicities in America," and noted: "Actually, the Hispanic community was not my target before I read 'The Great Replacement.'" Crusius was clearly inspired in large part by Tarrant, who in turn said he was inspired by seeing demographic change in France when he traveled to Europe in 2017. With that in the background, Crusius expressed deep concerns about politics in the U.S. One of the "biggest betrayals" in history, he wrote, was "the takeover of the United States government by unchecked corporations." Crusius said he could write "a ten page essay on all the damage these corporations have caused." But the biggest problem, he said, was a dangerous political mix: "Due to the death of the baby boomers, the increasingly anti-immigrant rhetoric of the right and the ever increasing Hispanic population, America will soon become a one party-state." That one party, of course, was the Democratic Party. And although Crusius had little use for Republicans, he was most angry about what he had seen in the recent Democratic presidential debates: They intend to use open borders, free healthcare for illegals, citizenship and more to enact a political coup by importing and then legalizing millions of new voters. With policies like these, the Hispanic support for Democrats will likely become nearly unanimous in the future. The heavy Hispanic population in Texas will make us a Democrat stronghold. Losing Texas and a few other states with heavy Hispanic population to the Democrats is all it would take for them to win nearly every presidential election. Although the Republican Party is also terrible. Many factions within the Republican Party are pro-corporation. Pro-corporation = pro-immigration. But some factions within the Republican Party don't prioritize corporations over our future. So the Democrats are nearly unanimous with their support of immigration while the Republicans are divided over it. At least with Republicans, the process of mass immigration and citizenship can be greatly reduced. That is a not-inaccurate restatement of some of the calculations that have been going on in both Republican and Democratic strategy rooms around the country for many years, certainly before the emergence of Donald Trump as a presidential candidate. Crusius expressed a number of reasons for his anxiety about immigration. Among them was the growth of automation in the American economy. "Continued immigration will make one of the biggest issues of our time, automation, so much worse," Crusius wrote. Crusius had obviously read reports that millions of American jobs will be lost to automation in coming years. He noted that while "some people will be retrained ... most will not." Crusius felt automation would take away his future, too. "My whole life I have been preparing for a future that currently doesn't exist," he wrote. "The job of my dreams will likely be automated." The automation threat, Crusius continued, means the U.S. "will have to initiate a basic universal income to prevent widespread poverty and civil unrest as people lose their jobs." (Crusius shared an interest in universal basic income, or UBI, and a pessimism about job retraining, with Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.) Crusius' idea was that fewer "invaders" meant more resources for government programs. "Achieving ambitious social projects like universal healthcare and UBI would become far more likely to succeed if tens of millions of dependents are removed," he wrote. Then there was education, the price of college, and the job market. "The cost of college degrees has exploded as their value has plummeted," Crusius wrote. As a result, "a generation of indebted, overqualified students [are] filling menial, low paying, and unfulfilling jobs." A high school degree used to be "worth something," he said. No longer. And then, the environment. Americans enjoy an "incredible" quality of life, Crusius wrote, but "our lifestyle is destroying the environment of our country." Corporations, he said, are destroying the environment by "shamelessly over-harvesting resources." Crusius cited a children's book by Dr. Seuss, The Lorax, which dealt with environmental devastation. It was published in 1971 and was made into a successful movie in 2012, when Crusius was 14. "This phenomenon is brilliantly portrayed in the decades old classic 'The Lorax,'" Crusius wrote. "Water sheds around the country, especially in agricultural areas, are being depleted. Fresh water is being polluted from farming and oil drilling operations. Consumer culture is creating thousands of tons of unnecessary plastic waste and electronic waste, and recycling to help slow this down is almost non-existent." There was more: "Urban sprawl creates inefficient cities which unnecessarily destroys millions of acres of land," Crusius wrote. And: "We even use God knows how many trees worth of paper towels just [to] wipe water off our hands." After his environmental concerns, Crusius, incredibly, moved to a discussion of the AK-47 versus the AR-15. And then to his racial theories. "I am against race mixing because it destroys genetic diversity and creates identity problems," he wrote. "Racial diversity will disappear as either race mixing or genocide will take place. But the idea of deporting or murdering all non-white Americans is horrific. Many have been here at least as long as the whites, and have done as much to build our country." Crusius then suggested dividing America into a "confederacy of territories" by race. Crusius ended the manifesto by saying he expected to be killed in the attack he would allegedly carry out on Saturday. As it turned out, the shooter was not, and he is now behind bars, charged with killing 22 people and wounding 26 others. He said his actions would be misunderstood as being tied to Trump. "My ideology has not changed for several years," Crusius wrote. "My opinions on automation, immigration, and the rest predate Trump and his campaign for president. I [am] putting this here because some people will blame the President or certain presidential candidates for the attack. This is not the case. I know that the media will probably call me a white supremacist anyway and blame Trump's rhetoric. The media is infamous for fake news. Their reaction to this attack will likely just confirm that." That was the only time Trump appeared in the manifesto, and it appears clear that Crusius borrowed his "fake news" characterization of the news media from the president. But that is not what Trump's critics have charged. They have charged that Trump inspired Crusius to kill. They have charged it so often in the last few days that it has hardened into a general perception that Crusius was inspired by the president. But read the manifesto. It's just not there. *The word "invasion" has been used in connection with illegal immigration since long before the president ran for office. In the 1990s, for example, the state of California unsuccessfully sued the federal government, claiming the government did not protect states from an "invasion" of illegal immigrants. In 2010, the state of Arizona also unsuccessfully challenged the federal government over a similar "invasion." The word was also used, well before Trump, in general commentary, usually by those who sought to restrict immigration levels into the United States. And more generally, too: Bobby Jindal, the son of immigrants and governor of Louisiana who ended his 2016 presidential campaign with a bitter attack on Trump, used to say that "immigration without assimilation is invasion." Buy into it what you want - Not really sure where this Nutbag falls politically, and don't really care. He should hang for the slaughter he brought on innocent people. The question still remains - how do you keep nuts like him and the Dayton shooter from legal gun ownership? Neither of those guys broke the law obtaining their legal weapons..... And trying to blame "assault weapons" is an exercise in futility. Neither of those weapons were "military grade". Just plain semi-automatic rifles just like the good old innocent looking Remington 7400 hunting rifle that just look meaner.......
  9. Nope - just a convenient dodge......... So why even try? And more importantly would the red flag laws being bounced around have worked on either of the 2 shootings last week?
  10. Agreed, but they had a plausible alibi - E-Verify.......
  11. OK - Had to get that out of my system.......
  12. E-Verify - an even greater joke than the employers......
  13. Through all of these memes back and forth - the story remains........Is ANYONE surprised Epstein is dead, or like SF, that he lasted this long....... His cell mate was removed. The camera was not facing the right direction. The guards were overworked. They were short staffed. Despite a presumed previous attempt at suicide, the suicide watch was lifted. I still haven't heard what he hung himself with. If he was on watch they would have taken everything that is a hazard.
  14. https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/05/we-have-studied-every-mass-shooting-1966-heres-what-weve-learned-about-shooters?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR2BeTU6IhfEgQiQVeijf6RcTrQcQFy9KaA0UqaVV2t4zt6xzovb8F8lLgA We Have Studied Every Mass Shooting Since 1966. Here’s What We’ve Learned About the Shooters Instead of simply rehearsing for the inevitable, we need to use that data to drive effective prevention strategies. by Jillian Peterson, James Densley Family members of 13-year-old Gilroy shooting victim Keyla Salazar console each other before a San Jose vigil. (Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times) In the last week, more than 30 people have died in three separate mass shootings in Gilroy, El Paso and Dayton, Ohio. We believe that analyzing and understanding data about who commits such massacres can help prevent more lives being lost. For two years, we’ve been studying the life histories of mass shooters in the United States for a project funded by the National Institute of Justice, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice. We’ve built a database dating back to 1966 of every mass shooter who shot and killed four or more people in a public place, and every shooting incident at schools, workplaces, and places of worship since 1999. We’ve interviewed incarcerated perpetrators and their families, shooting survivors and first responders. We’ve read media and social media, manifestos, suicide notes, trial transcripts and medical records. Our goal has been to find new, data-driven pathways for preventing such shootings. Although we haven’t found that mass shooters are all alike, our data do reveal four commonalities among the perpetrators of nearly all the mass shootings we studied. First, the vast majority of mass shooters in our study experienced early childhood trauma and exposure to violence at a young age. The nature of their exposure included parental suicide, physical or sexual abuse, neglect, domestic violence, and/or severe bullying. The trauma was often a precursor to mental health concerns, including depression, anxiety, thought disorders or suicidality. Second, practically every mass shooter we studied had reached an identifiable crisis point in the weeks or months leading up to the shooting. They often had become angry and despondent because of a specific grievance. For workplace shooters, a change in job status was frequently the trigger. For shooters in other contexts, relationship rejection or loss often played a role. Such crises were, in many cases, communicated to others through a marked change in behavior, an expression of suicidal thoughts or plans, or specific threats of violence. Third, most of the shooters had studied the actions of other shooters and sought validation for their motives. People in crisis have always existed. But in the age of 24-hour rolling news and social media, there are scripts to follow that promise notoriety in death. Societal fear and fascination with mass shootings partly drives the motivation to commit them. Hence, as we have seen in the last week, mass shootings tend to come in clusters. They are socially contagious. Perpetrators study other perpetrators and model their acts after previous shootings. Many are radicalized online in their search for validation from others that their will to murder is justified. Fourth, the shooters all had the means to carry out their plans. Once someone decides life is no longer worth living and that murdering others would be a proper revenge, only means and opportunity stand in the way of another mass shooting. Is an appropriate shooting site accessible? Can the would-be shooter obtain firearms? In 80% of school shootings, perpetrators got their weapons from family members, according to our data. Workplace shooters tended to use handguns they legally owned. Other public shooters were more likely to acquire them illegally. So what do these commonalities tell us about how to prevent future shootings? One step needs to be depriving potential shooters of the means to carry out their plans. Potential shooting sites can be made less accessible with visible security measures such as metal detectors and police officers. And weapons need to be better controlled, through age restrictions, permit-to-purchase licensing, universal background checks, safe storage campaigns and red-flag laws — measures that help control firearm access for vulnerable individuals or people in crisis. Another step is to try to make it more difficult for potential perpetrators to find validation for their planned actions. Media campaigns like #nonotoriety are helping starve perpetrators of the oxygen of publicity, and technology companies are increasingly being held accountable for facilitating mass violence. But we all can slow the spread of mass shootings by changing how we consume, produce, and distribute violent content on media and social media. Don’t like or share violent content. Don’t read or share killers’ manifestos and other hate screeds posted on the internet. We also need to study our current approaches. For example, do lockdown and active shooter drills help children prepare for the worst or hand potential shooters the script for mass violence by normalizing or rehearsing it? We also need to, as a society, be more proactive. Most mass public shooters are suicidal, and their crises are often well known to others before the shooting occurs. The vast majority of mass shooters leak their plans ahead of time. People who see or sense something is wrong, however, may not always say something to someone owing to the absence of clear reporting protocols or fear of overreaction and unduly labeling a person as a potential threat. Proactive violence prevention starts with schools, colleges, churches and employers initiating conversations about mental health and establishing systems for identifying individuals in crisis, reporting concerns and reaching out — not with punitive measures but with resources and long-term intervention. Everyone should be trained to recognize the signs of a crisis. Proactivity needs to extend also to the traumas in early life that are common to so many mass shooters. Those early exposures to violence need addressing when they happen with ready access to social services and high-quality, affordable mental health treatment in the community. School counselors and social workers, employee wellness programs, projects that teach resilience and social emotional learning, and policies and practices that decrease the stigma around mental illness will not just help prevent mass shootings, but will also help promote the social and emotional success of all Americans. Our data show that mass shooters have much in common. Instead of simply rehearsing for the inevitable, we need to use that data to drive effective prevention strategies.
  15. Poor old Joe..... https://nypost.com/2019/08/08/latest-biden-blunder-poor-kids-are-just-as-bright-as-white-kids/ Gaffe-prone presidential hopeful Joe Biden put his foot in his mouth during an Iowa campaign stop on Thursday when he told a group of predominately Asian and Hispanic voters that “poor kids are just as bright, just as talented, as white kids.” Biden committed the stunning blunder while speaking about education at a town hall with the Asian and Latino Coalition in Des Moines, where he’s campaigning and fundraising for the 2020 Democratic primary. “We should challenge students in these schools and have advanced placement programs in these schools. We have this notion that somehow if you’re poor, you cannot do it,” Biden said at the event, according to video of his remarks. “Poor kids are just as bright, just as talented, as white kids,” he added. Biden almost immediately went into damage control mode, quickly adding: “wealthy kids, black kids, Asian kids, no I really mean it, but think how we think about it.” But President Trump’s campaign quickly seized on the tongue slip, with his “rapid response director” Andrew Clark tweeting out a video clip of the remark. “Yikes…have fun mitigating that one,” he tweeted. Biden walked out of the Democratic primary debates last week red-faced after he accidentally told donors to “go to Joe 30330” when he meant to tell them to “text JOE to 30330″ to donate. On Monday, the befuddled 76-year-old bungled the locations of the El Paso and Dayton mass shootings when he expressed sympathy for the “tragic events in Houston today and also in Michigan the day before.”
  16. What (if any) of the newly anointed "enhanced background checks" laws would have been able to prevent either of the POS's in the recent events from getting weapons?
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