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swordfish

D-Day - 75th anniversary.

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So thankful for this generation - Nuff Said......

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1 hour ago, swordfish said:

 

So thankful for this generation - Nuff Said......

I can remember when I was a kid, these folks were mid-late 40's...early 50's, they were old people to me, who seemed to be living in history. It's only come to me over time the sacrifices that were made. Fortunately as I have grown older, I've been able to be antiquated with several of this generation and had the opportunity to hear some of the stories, not necessarily of the war itself, just the times. It's sad that most of this generation are now gone, and with them the stories, the lives, the history and the lessons of the great war.  

I think now more than ever, it is important that we remember and learn from, not only what happened on the coast of northern France 75 years ago, but from the entire time in human history. 

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Time to Pay Your Respects to the Plywood Boat that Helped Win WWII: https://jalopnik.com/time-to-pay-your-respects-to-the-plywood-boat-that-help-1835301842

Quote

As you likely know, it’s the 75th anniversary of D-Day, when 160,000 Allied troops invaded the beaches of Normandy, undertaking the largest from-the-sea invasion in the history of human warfare and marking the beginning of the end for the Axis. The actual business of getting over 100,000 soldiers and a metric crapton of vehicles and equipment from the ocean on to land is a decidedly non-trivial problem, one that the Allies solved with a brilliant but simple patented plywood boat: the Landing Craft, Vehicle and Personnel (LCVP), also called the Higgins Boat.

The Higgins Boat, named after its inventor, Andrew Higgins, was designed to solve what was basically the “last mile” problem for a military invasion: they could get all the troops and equipment over to the coast on large naval transport ships, but how do you then get all those people and that stuff from the ships onto the sandy beach?

Higgins’ boat design, called “Eureka,” had a shallow draft and a protected propeller and were very easy to beach and then return to the water, all properties of the later LCVP. During prohibition, Higgins sold these types of fast, maneuverable boats to both liquor bootleggers and the Coast Guardthat chased them down, a pretty savvy business decision.

During testing in 1938 by the Marines and Navy, Higgins’ Eureka boats were found to outperform the boats the Navy had designed themselves. Higgins was encouraged (but not yet paid) to develop versions of his boats specifically for Naval use, and did so between 1939 and 1941, though his initial boats did not have the crucial bow that dropped down to form a ramp, which meant that troops had to climb out over the sides, making them vulnerable, and there was no good way to unload heavy equipment like Jeeps.

The front-as-a-ramp idea came from the Marine Corps, and in 1941 re-designed the boat to include the front drop-down ramp, dramatically improving the usefulness of the boat.

Now troops could exit a beached boat quickly, and jeeps and even tanks could be literally driven out of the boat and right onto the beach, ready to go.

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That front ramp, made of steel, also provided most of the arms-fire protection for the troops inside the boat, and once that thing dropped down when they hit shore, there was no real protection inside the boat, which certainly helped encourage everyone to get the hell out of there and onto the shore.

The boats also had a pair of machine gun turrets and were powered by a seven-liter inline-six diesel engine making 225 horsepower, which was enough to push the 36-foot boat to 12 knots, or about 14 mph.

....

There’s very few original Higgins Boats left today, less than 20 by some counts, but if you really want to see what one was like, there is one on display outside the National Inventors Hall of Fame Museum at the United States Patent Office Headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia.

So, as you remember the monumental events of D-Day today, take a moment to also remember the big floating wooden box with the flip-down front that made it all possible.

 

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15 hours ago, Irishman said:

This is a great summation by Andy Rooney
"There have only been a handful of days since the beginning of time on which the direction the world was taking has been changed for the better in one 24-hour period by an act of man."

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/andy-rooney-on-world-war-ii-d-day-a-day-unlike-any-other-60-minutes-2019-06-06/

Thank you Irish.....can't believe how many times I've teared up over the past few days.  Inspiring doesn't even come close to describing our heroes.

Sharing this one I read...heard this story on the news as well.  Just incredible.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/d-day-hero-recounts-horror-of-normandy-invasion/

Ernie Pyle's account of walking the beaches of Normandy and what he saw with his own eyes...several days after the June 6th invasion....wow....

http://www.dailyjournal.net/2019/06/06/ernie_pyle_a_long_thin_line_of_personal_anguish/

 

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