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  2. Notable reduced-player football alumni[edit] Every year, eight-man football players, as well as other reduced-player football players, receive scholarships and/or opportunities to play collegiately. Below is a list of notable reduced-player football alumni. [8] Leighton Vander Esch — (born February 8, 1996) is an American football linebacker for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted in the 1st Round of the 2018 NFL draft with the 19th overall pick. He was also named to the 2018 Pro Bowl. Tarik Cohen — (born July 26, 1995) is an American football running back for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). Cohen played the same position for North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University before being selected in the fourth round of the 2017 NFL Draft. He was also named to the 2018 Pro Bowl. Rashaan Salaam – (October 8, 1974 – December 5, 2016) was a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons during the 1990s. Salaam played college football for the University of Colorado and won the 1994 Heisman Trophy. He was picked by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Bears and Cleveland Browns of the NFL. Collegiately, in addition to winning the Heisman Trophy, Salaam was a unanimous All-American selection and awarded the Walter Camp Award (1994), Doak Walker Award (1994), and Jim Brown Award (1994). His NFL career lasted five seasons, along with two seasons spent in the Canadian Football League. He is the youngest player to rush for 1,000 yards in a season (21 years, 77 days old). Josh Brown – (born April 29, 1979) is an American football placekicker, formerly for the New York Giants of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the seventh round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Nebraska. Brown was a member of the 2005 Seattle Seahawks NFC Champion team. He was also awarded the PFW Golden Toe Award in 2006. Nolan Cromwell – (born January 30, 1955) is an American football player and coach who currently serves as a senior offensive assistant for the Cleveland Browns. He was an All-Pro safety for the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL and played for the University of Kansas in college, where he earned All-American honors. Cromwell played for the Rams from 1977 through 1987 and was named to the Pro Bowl in four consecutive years, 1980 through 1983. He played on the Rams' 1979–1980 Super Bowl XIV team. He was the Rams' wide receivers coach from 2010 to 2011. He was named the Wichita Eagle's high school football player of the decade for the 1970s.[9] Chad Greenway – (born January 12, 1983) is a former American football linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Iowa, and was drafted by the Vikings in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He was a two-time Pro Bowl selection (2011, 2012) and Second-team All-Pro (2012). He was awarded the Ed Block Courage Award (2007) and was the NFC Combined Tackles Leader (2010) and also ranked #70 in the Top 100 NFL Players of 2013. Jack Pardee (Six-man) – (April 19, 1936 – April 1, 2013) was an American football linebacker and the only head coach to helm a team in college football, the National Football League, the United States Football League, the World Football League, and the Canadian Football League. Pardee was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1986. As a teenager, Pardee moved to Christoval, Texas, where he excelled as a member of the six-man football team.[10] He was an All-American linebacker at Texas A&M University and a two-time All-Pro with the Los Angeles Rams (1963) and the Washington Redskins (1971). He was one of the few six-man players to ever make it to the NFL, and his knowledge of that wide-open game would serve him well as a coach. Dean Steinkuhler – (born January 27, 1961) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons in the 1980s and 1990s. Steinkuhler played college football for the University of Nebraska, and was recognized as an All-American. While playing collegiately, he won the Outland Trophy (1983), Lombardi Award (1983), and the UPI Lineman of the Year (1983). He was selected in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Houston Oilers of the NFL. Steinkuhler is also remembered for being the player who picked up quarterback Turner Gill's intentional fumble in the 1984 Orange Bowl and ran it 19 yards for a touchdown in a play dubbed the "Fumblerooski". Roland Woolsey – (born August 11, 1953 in Provo, Utah) is a former professional American football player who played in four NFL seasons for the Dallas Cowboys, Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and the St. Louis Cardinals. He played college football at Boise State University.
  3. Notable reduced-player football alumni[edit] Every year, eight-man football players, as well as other reduced-player football players, receive scholarships and/or opportunities to play collegiately. Below is a list of notable reduced-player football alumni. [8] Leighton Vander Esch — (born February 8, 1996) is an American football linebacker for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted in the 1st Round of the 2018 NFL draft with the 19th overall pick. He was also named to the 2018 Pro Bowl. Tarik Cohen — (born July 26, 1995) is an American football running back for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). Cohen played the same position for North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University before being selected in the fourth round of the 2017 NFL Draft. He was also named to the 2018 Pro Bowl. Rashaan Salaam – (October 8, 1974 – December 5, 2016) was a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons during the 1990s. Salaam played college football for the University of Colorado and won the 1994 Heisman Trophy. He was picked by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Bears and Cleveland Browns of the NFL. Collegiately, in addition to winning the Heisman Trophy, Salaam was a unanimous All-American selection and awarded the Walter Camp Award (1994), Doak Walker Award (1994), and Jim Brown Award (1994). His NFL career lasted five seasons, along with two seasons spent in the Canadian Football League. He is the youngest player to rush for 1,000 yards in a season (21 years, 77 days old). Josh Brown – (born April 29, 1979) is an American football placekicker, formerly for the New York Giants of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the seventh round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Nebraska. Brown was a member of the 2005 Seattle Seahawks NFC Champion team. He was also awarded the PFW Golden Toe Award in 2006. Nolan Cromwell – (born January 30, 1955) is an American football player and coach who currently serves as a senior offensive assistant for the Cleveland Browns. He was an All-Pro safety for the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL and played for the University of Kansas in college, where he earned All-American honors. Cromwell played for the Rams from 1977 through 1987 and was named to the Pro Bowl in four consecutive years, 1980 through 1983. He played on the Rams' 1979–1980 Super Bowl XIV team. He was the Rams' wide receivers coach from 2010 to 2011. He was named the Wichita Eagle's high school football player of the decade for the 1970s.[9] Chad Greenway – (born January 12, 1983) is a former American football linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Iowa, and was drafted by the Vikings in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He was a two-time Pro Bowl selection (2011, 2012) and Second-team All-Pro (2012). He was awarded the Ed Block Courage Award (2007) and was the NFC Combined Tackles Leader (2010) and also ranked #70 in the Top 100 NFL Players of 2013. Jack Pardee (Six-man) – (April 19, 1936 – April 1, 2013) was an American football linebacker and the only head coach to helm a team in college football, the National Football League, the United States Football League, the World Football League, and the Canadian Football League. Pardee was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1986. As a teenager, Pardee moved to Christoval, Texas, where he excelled as a member of the six-man football team.[10] He was an All-American linebacker at Texas A&M University and a two-time All-Pro with the Los Angeles Rams (1963) and the Washington Redskins (1971). He was one of the few six-man players to ever make it to the NFL, and his knowledge of that wide-open game would serve him well as a coach. Dean Steinkuhler – (born January 27, 1961) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons in the 1980s and 1990s. Steinkuhler played college football for the University of Nebraska, and was recognized as an All-American. While playing collegiately, he won the Outland Trophy (1983), Lombardi Award (1983), and the UPI Lineman of the Year (1983). He was selected in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Houston Oilers of the NFL. Steinkuhler is also remembered for being the player who picked up quarterback Turner Gill's intentional fumble in the 1984 Orange Bowl and ran it 19 yards for a touchdown in a play dubbed the "Fumblerooski". Roland Woolsey – (born August 11, 1953 in Provo, Utah) is a former professional American football player who played in four NFL seasons for the Dallas Cowboys, Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and the St. Louis Cardinals. He played college football at Boise State University.
  4. I would recommend co-ops for Indiana as well. In my opinion, the only contraction Indiana needs is in the number of school corporations.
  5. Baseball is the court jester. My brother-in-law was a standout for the Vikings back in the day.
  6. Yep. One of the reasons so many immigrants flock to America. Have you seen what protestors in Hong Kong are carrying around with them to reiterate and support their stance? The American flag...
  7. Barr-Reeve and Loogootee don't even field soccer teams. Basketball is king along US Hwy. 50....
  8. I am right here Irish. You can tag me so I can see what you are saying. We live in the GREATEST country EVER. The state does not mandate masks be worn. The nation does not mandate masks be worn. It is our choice. I made a choice. Costco could have asked me to leave. They did not.
  9. It's a disingenuous question to ask if mourning how someone dies is an either/or proposition. All of them are sad stories, but to draw on them for this particular conversation is an apples and oranges comparison. Car accidents, swimming accidents, and gun violence are not contagious viruses that have caused a world wide pandemic. I would add that the responsibility in the situations you mentioned does not fall on a school or coach; where it definitely will for covid.
  10. Yep. A conference championship game is essential.
  11. I already addressed this in another thread, but for you my friend, I will address it again.....Yes. If my employer says I MUST wear a mask, I will. Agreed.
  12. No problem. I’m all for it. More direct path to the playoff.
  13. It’s more like “speed” vs “power”. You do see some novel schemes. When we played Eureka County, the only thing the QB said before snapping the ball was “GO!” His team mates already knew what to do, and they’d switch formations between plays. For some reason, they’d have one random player deep in the backfield. We did a lot of RPO.
  14. My biggest problem all along has been the unwillingness of those who say "science is the answer", yet refuse to look at factual data and only make decisions based on emotion (fear). There was a 16 year killed in an accidental shooting here in Evansville last week. https://www.courierpress.com/story/news/2020/07/06/juvenile-dead-after-sunday-night-shooting-police/5382529002/ The week before that, two teens were killed in a car crash. https://www.courierpress.com/story/news/2020/06/28/names-2-teens-killed-vanderburgh-co-crash-friday-released/3275314001/ The week before that, an 18 year old died in a swimming accident near Jasper - at a graduation party! https://duboiscountyherald.com/b/jasper-man-who-died-after-falling-into-lake-identified If you want to only worry about football players, I can remind you that Mario McCullough of Cathedral was shot and killed in March. Are these deaths not tragic? Can we not mourn their passing because they didn't die of COVID? Football players have died of heat stroke. Football players have been paralyzed. Football players have had life-changing broken bones, ACL tears, etc. We know the risks. We take precautions. We play football.
  15. Can Costco fire him? Are young eyes upon him at Costco? Personal vs professional my friend. If Costco refused him service, he has other options.
  16. I don't disagree.....but again, none of those numbers matter for the school or community for a kid that does lose his/her life from having it. In a lawsuit happy society, schools are really forced to overreact in a situation like this rather than just keep going no matter the consequences.
  17. Thanks, and I agree. I tell my students that same message, we all have to do things in life we don't want to. That said, it just does not seem to be be consistent with what he told us about his Costco experience.
  18. From a funding standpoint, how does the 8 man differ from 11 man? Same equipment/supply costs, still have to pay coaches, refs,etc. I would assume most of these schools have a field of some sort inside of their track, but who knows what upgrades or updates are needed. Logistically, I just don't see how schools that have made the choice not to play 11 man football for years can make the financial commitment for 8 man when it clearly hasn't been important to them. Remember, expressing interest is not the same as actually signing up and playing.
  19. YES. He said he would. He also wore it on the plane to FL. When my wife says we are going over to the in-laws house but I really just want to stay home and watch football, do I still go? YES. We all do things in life we don’t want to despite our opinions. It’s called being an adult.
  20. Today
  21. While true, you can’t stop the world based on the “potential” of one kid passing away from it. I hate to sound unempathetic but if there is a 99.8% recovery rate, someone is going to make up the .2%. There are outliers. I'd never wish death upon anyone, especially an adolescent but we can’t all live in a bubble. Students 18 and under are more likely to die in a car/bus accident on the way to/from school statistically. Should we also stop transportation?
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