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Oklahoma and Texas to SEC


DE
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Guest DT
8 minutes ago, Bash Riprock said:

Agree....OK State has great facilities.  Strong in wrestling, baseball and golf...basketball has been solid.  Not sure about the academic rankings and how they fit with the Big 10.  I've heard Iowa is already pushing hard for Iowa State.  

Hard to see GT, UVA and Carolina's ever leaving the ACC....but then again, hard to see all the changes happening now a few years ago.....

I think Texas and perhaps even OU may learn what Arkansas learned leaving the SWC for the SEC....winning is going to get a whole lot tougher......

OK State is not an AAU school, so they will not be invited to Big Ten.

Iowa State is an AAU school, and with Iowa's backing, they are sure to get in.

Self will be gone soon enough.  KU to the BT is a 100 year committment and beyond.  Plus their poor football helps balance out a top heavy football conference.  

Arkansas will welcome UT and OU to the SEC with open arms.  Texas recruiting will open back up for the Hogs, which thay have lost over the past 20 years.  And remember, Arkansas-Texas was a bigger game than OU - Texas for decades before the Big 12 split them apart.  

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8 minutes ago, DT said:

OK State is not an AAU school, so they will not be invited to Big Ten.

Iowa State is an AAU school, and with Iowa's backing, they are sure to get in.

Self will be gone soon enough.  KU to the BT is a 100 year committment and beyond.  Plus their poor football helps balance out a top heavy football conference.  

Arkansas will welcome UT and OU to the SEC with open arms.  Texas recruiting will open back up for the Hogs, which thay have lost over the past 20 years.  And remember, Arkansas-Texas was a bigger game than OU - Texas for decades before the Big 12 split them apart.  

AAU schools?

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16 minutes ago, DT said:

OK State is not an AAU school, so they will not be invited to Big Ten.

 

I am not disagreeing about OSU.  What about Nebraska?  Are they the only non-AAU school in the Big 10?

4 minutes ago, DE said:

Thank you.  I have never heard of this.

@DTWhat does AAU schools have to do with it?

I know I am not DT....

https://www.aau.edu/who-we-are

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Bash Riprock said:

I am seeing this list has Michigan St. and no Rutgers (unless I missed them).  The other list I read (https://www.aau.edu/who-we-are/our-members) did not have MSU, but did have Rutgers.

1 minute ago, Bash Riprock said:

I am not disagreeing about OSU.  What about Nebraska?  Are they the only non-AAU school in the Big 10?

I know I am not DT....

https://www.aau.edu/who-we-are

 

 

Thank you again.

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It appears out of the 14 members of the B1G Conference, University of Nebraska is the only non AAU school.

I also didn't realize how small their enrollment was compared to the rest of the conference, excluding private Northwestern.

***Not to do with the B1G conference, but I had no idea Tulane was a private university until reading through all these lists.

Very interesting.  Thank you fellas for pointing me to new information.

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Guest DT
27 minutes ago, DE said:

AAU schools?

Association of American Universities - It is an academic accreditation that BT requires for all members.  Nebraska lost their ranking briefly several years ago and took a lot of guff from the conference academic hierarchy.

Usually only major land grant schjools have the accredation.

KU has it.  KSU does not

OU has it.  OSU does not.

Iowa has it.  ISU also has it.  Hence they are likely in.

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59 minutes ago, DT said:

Association of American Universities - It is an academic accreditation that BT requires for all members.  Nebraska lost their ranking briefly several years ago and took a lot of guff from the conference academic hierarchy.

Usually only major land grant schjools have the accredation.

KU has it.  KSU does not

OU has it.  OSU does not.

Iowa has it.  ISU also has it.  Hence they are likely in.

With college athletics essentially becoming de facto semi-pro leagues in the revenue generating sports, should academic accreditation really be gauged? OU and UT happened for one reason: $$$. The term student-athlete really doesn’t apply anymore.

Kansas and Iowa really do nothing for the B10 if you look at the bigger picture. Neither of those schools football programs are going to move the needle in media re-negotiations and they’re simple going to cut into the existing members revenue share.

There’s 3-4 schools from a financial standpoint that make sense; Notre Dame, Clemson, UCLA and USC. If you can’t get any of them, don’t bother. Sometimes less is more

 

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And then there’s this:

https://saturdayblitz.com/2021/07/25/college-football-realignment-what-does-the-acc-do-next/

Notre Dame, Penn State would make sense in the ACC

What will happen to ACC football in the midst of what looks like another round of realignment in college football? How about adding Notre Dame and Penn State? 

College football seems on the cusp of another major realignment. How will the ACC respond to the reported power moves made by the SEC?

This past week it was reported Texas and Oklahoma were going to make a move to the SEC. This set off a chain of speculation across the college football world. Questions abound from what a new 16 team SEC would look like to what the remaining eight members of the Big 12 would do to is this only the beginning of super conferences?

The ACC certainly is not immune to this latest potential seismic shift in college football. Some have speculated the conference could be raided itself for teams. While possible, it seems unlikely with the ACC’s grant of media rights running through 2036. If a school left, their media rights would still remain with the ACC.

Despite a nice contract with ESPN and the ACC Network, the ACC remains at the bottom of the Power 5 in media rights revenue. In the last couple of seasons, Big Ten schools on average earned about $20-25 million more than ACC schools. The expansion would allow the ACC to renegotiate their contracts and needs to be seriously considered by the conference.

The first school that is a no-brainer to add is Notre Dame. The Fighting Irish have been the forbidden crown jewel that some conferences have been trying to add for years. The Big Ten flirted with the Irish in the past but the school ultimately decided to keep its football independence.

In recent times Notre Dame is partially aligned with ACC football. The Irish would get to keep their independence but they do have five scheduled football games a year versus ACC football teams.

Last year during the pandemic Notre Dame was a member of the ACC for the odd season but it worked and the conference got two members into the College Football Playoff for the first time.

Also, the ACC media rights contract does state that if Notre Dame does join a conference before 2036, it must be the ACC.

It will be a hard sell to finally get Notre Dame to join a conference but what a coup it would be for new conference commissioner James Phillips. How much more of a coup would it be to pull in another big football program? This is where Penn State comes in.

ACC should target Penn State?

I can already hear the naysayers on this. No way would the Nittany Lions ever leave the Big Ten, the richest conference in today’s landscape. The 30-year marriage of Penn State and the Big Ten has had rocky moments but overall has been a success for both parties.

The keywords in the above paragraph are “today’s landscape”. If both Notre Dame and Penn State were to join the ACC, that’s another huge seismic shift. It would certainly give the ACC leverage to renegotiate their media deals. The money would likely increase significantly, putting the ACC in the upper tier of media rights.

While Penn State has built some rivalries with Big Ten members, their biggest long-time rivals are in the ACC. Playing rivals Pitt, Syracuse, and Boston College on the regular again is rather enticing.

Of course, playing Notre Dame and Miami would be fun along with adding new matchups with Virginia, Virginia Tech, and North Carolina.

A move like this would leave the Big Ten hanging. Adding a school from the remaining eight Big 12 schools would not carry the same weight as the Nittany Lions.

All of this is highly speculative and of course, is unlikely to happen. It is fun to formulate different scenarios with college football realignment. If the ACC could pull off not one but two major additions in Notre Dame and Penn State, they would likely leapfrog right behind the SEC in regards to money and power.

 

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6 hours ago, DT said:

You would not want KU basketball in the Big Ten?

No thanks, the school has nothing else to offer. No wrestling , soccer, swimming, all the sports that big ten schools excel in and are known for. Football  at Kansas ?  

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14 hours ago, Footballking16 said:

With college athletics essentially becoming de facto semi-pro leagues in the revenue generating sports, should academic accreditation really be gauged? OU and UT happened for one reason: $$$. The term student-athlete really doesn’t apply anymore.

Kansas and Iowa really do nothing for the B10 if you look at the bigger picture. Neither of those schools football programs are going to move the needle in media re-negotiations and they’re simple going to cut into the existing members revenue share.

There’s 3-4 schools from a financial standpoint that make sense; Notre Dame, Clemson, UCLA and USC. If you can’t get any of them, don’t bother. Sometimes less is more

 

Agreed regarding revenue share. I do think B1G schools take the academic accreditation seriously. The University of Chicago is still a member of the Big Ten Academic Alliance. I actually wouldn't be surprised if the Big Ten, ACC, and Pac 12 all stood firm.

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2 minutes ago, Boilernation said:

Yes. A lot of smoke around him. He has an awful reputation among college coaches as being dirty. 

Thank you. 

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Watching Paul Finebaum show and there is a guest, Steve Berkowitz from USA Today speaking about his article. 
 

The analysis says if SEC adds Texas and Oklahoma, the conference could generate as much revenue as ncaa. 😮 

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Although I whipped that dead horse, AAU membership is a big thing.  I have also heard that the SEC ahs been in talking with Michigan and Ohio State about joining.  Then again, I also read a report wanting the ACC and SEC to merge.  I can't say I like either scenario. 

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23 hours ago, DE said:

It appears out of the 14 members of the B1G Conference, University of Nebraska is the only non AAU school.

I also didn't realize how small their enrollment was compared to the rest of the conference, excluding private Northwestern.

***Not to do with the B1G conference, but I had no idea Tulane was a private university until reading through all these lists.

Very interesting.  Thank you fellas for pointing me to new information.

I love Tulane and would have went there if I would have had the chance.  Papa & Mama Gipper vetoed it.

Edited by Gipper
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7 hours ago, Boilernation said:

Agreed regarding revenue share. I do think B1G schools take the academic accreditation seriously. The University of Chicago is still a member of the Big Ten Academic Alliance. I actually wouldn't be surprised if the Big Ten, ACC, and Pac 12 all stood firm.

I would be cool with that.  Sure, potential expansion can be fun, but:

Notre dame will not come, Kansas is hideously bad in football. Iowa State doesn't bring in any new TV markets (nor does Cincinnati, but there's no way in hell OSU lets that happen), I like Pitt, but are they an AAU member?  They seem pretty happy in the ACC and the same can be said for Syracuse and Boston College.  While I'm on the ACC, although I'd love UNC, UVA and Georgia Tech, there are far too many others to consider such as Duke, NC State, and Virginia Tech.  CU-Boulder and the Southern California Pac-12 schools would make for some great road trips, they're just too far away.   

 

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3 hours ago, DE said:

Watching Paul Finebaum show and there is a guest, Steve Berkowitz from USA Today speaking about his article. 
 

The analysis says if SEC adds Texas and Oklahoma, the conference could generate as much revenue as ncaa. 😮 

Further into his show, Jackie Sherrill was a guest.  He had great insight to the A&M/Texas hatred.

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14 hours ago, DE said:

Further into his show, Jackie Sherrill was a guest.  He had great insight to the A&M/Texas hatred.

I would imagine that hatred runs deep into Business and Politics. Oklahoma will be interesting if OSU is left with no other options than to join up with Houston, Memphis, CIncinnati, etc. I could foresee a lot of new anomosity between those two schools. The OSU President already released a statement that slams OU.

 

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As the landscape moves more and more toward 3-4 major power conferences, how does this ultimately impact the low or non-revenue generating sports?  As distances continue to increase between schools, how does this fair toward sports such as wrestling, swimming, gymnastics, etc.?  For example, the only school in the SEC that has wrestling is Missouri and that program competes in the MAC.  

I recently think about where Stanford was heading before the school changed their minds with the elimination of a number of collegiate sports.

Is the future less collegiate sports and more club sports?  Is that a good thing?  Thoughts??  I am not stating that is the future, but it does have me thinking....

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1 hour ago, Bash Riprock said:

As the landscape moves more and more toward 3-4 major power conferences, how does this ultimately impact the low or non-revenue generating sports?  As distances continue to increase between schools, how does this fair toward sports such as wrestling, swimming, gymnastics, etc.?  For example, the only school in the SEC that has wrestling is Missouri and that program competes in the MAC.  

I recently think about where Stanford was heading before the school changed their minds with the elimination of a number of collegiate sports.

Is the future less collegiate sports and more club sports?  Is that a good thing?  Thoughts??  I am not stating that is the future, but it does have me thinking....

That's the unintended consequences of NIL. With State and potentially Federal Law stating that the NCAA can't regulate players profiting off their image and likeness, what purpose does the NCAA stand to serve anymore? As you proposed, you'll likely see anywhere from 3-5 super conferences all collude and then collectively form their own league in basketball and football and negotiate their own TV deals and cutting off the heads of the rest of the remaining NCAA member schools. 

The NCAA as it stands today makes billions of dollars off TV deals for March Madness and the CFB Playoff that they redistribute back to the member schools to fund scholarship programs. Unless you're in one of those super conferences I don't know how you survive? I think you'll start to see many schools go the club model route. In general its bad if you ask me. 

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