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  1. No, I really don't know how Kelly got the nickname "Spike" and really don't remember how long it took for us to travel the 234 miles to South Bend from Linton but I do remember the difficulty we had getting home. Our bus carrying the band members broke down in Plymouth, Indiana, not far from SB. We had to spend the day in Plymouth while the bus was being repaired. We finally got home late that evening. As a band member. I recall we spent a few Saturdays during the summer selling "Band Tags" for 50 cents each downtown in Linton to raise enough money for us to make the trip and stay overnight in a South Bend hotel. That trip and the 1946 football game was a memorable highlight of my time at LHS.
    3 points
  2. As a means to continue to improve the overall level of high school football in Indiana, to continue to push for the drive to maintain competitive balance, to improve the level of community support and live game attendance, and to address the increasing expenses of long distance athletic event travel, Hoosier Highschool Football endorses the creation of a new athletic conference designed to achieve these objectives. This 8 school conference is yet to be named: Kokomo 4A Jefferson 6A Harrison 5A WLF 3A McCutcheon 5A Western 4A Lebanon 4A Logansport 4A HHF believes that all of these schools have a high level of commitment to high school football, have high quality and experienced staffs, solid feeder programs, a willingness to invest in necessary additional resources, and enjoy strong administrative, community, fan and alumni support.
    3 points
  3. Track Sectional with PAC teams last night. Gibson Southern won the sectional 31 team title. Michael Herren from Gibson Southern won the 100 (11.24), 200 (22.64) and was on the winning 4x100 team (3 of 4 and (maybe/hopefully all 4) are GS football players this fall). (44.68) Left to right Daniel Thomas, Sean DeLong, Michael Herren, Mason Scheller (all sophomores). Final Team Standings - Top 3 1. Gibson Southern 166 2. Princeton 153 3. South Knox 84 GS athletes who advance to Regional are listed!! Congrats to all athletes & coaches on a great night!!
    3 points
  4. I speak of this from actual experience. Leo staff talked to us here at Tarboro High School in Tarboro, NC. We have been running the T (we refer to it as the Tarboro T) since the 1950's. It is ingrained in our town. Our rec legs, middle schools, JV and Varsity all run the same offense. You can say what you what you want about the offense. But since 2008 we have played for Ten State Championships winning Seven of them. We have average over that time 35 points per game. So don't question the offense. If you preach the right thing and coach at the highest levels. Any offense can and will work. Teach what you know and get people to believe. That's what it is about. Just our opinion. We don't plan change our offense and we will still intended to compete for State Championships. Tarboro Football
    3 points
  5. I knew those free cheeseburgers at McDonald's for the A's we got on report cards was a slippery slope.
    3 points
  6. I went to the local tavern after the game and was still shivering from that game Whiting ain’t scared they’ve played mater dei, Andrean and frontier recently. They take on all comers
    2 points
  7. Rising Programs ***************************************** While the bluebloods of Indiana High School Football continue to dominate their respective classes, there are many others that are investing in their football operations and positioning themselves for a run at greater success. Hoosier Highschool Football recognizes the following programs who are getting it done on and off the field: Greenfield Central Former North Central Farmersburg coach Travis Nolting is in the midst of a major turnaround effort at Greenfield Central. Inheriting a winless program 4 years ago, GC is building, numbers are way up, a comprehensive strength and conditioning program has been installed, and the Cougars are primed and ready to take the next step up the Hoosier Heritage Conference ladder and push New Palestine and Mount Vernon in conference play. Delta Another Hoosier Heritage team, Delta, is also rebuilding and Chris Overholt has a deep and experienced roster returning for the 2022 season. Biggest news for the Eagles is the drop down to class 3A where Delta can be a real dark horse contender in its first year in this new classification. Muncie Central The Bearcats have been off the radar for years, but Muncie Central made the state's best off season coaching hire, bringing in Centerville head coach Kyle Padgett. Padgett and his staff are in the process of rebuilding the program from the bottom up, starting with an all-in change in culture, commitment, and effort. It won't happen overnight, but look for MC to make significant strides over the next several seasons, as long as they can hold on to their new coach. Laville The Lancers have quietly made significant improvements in the rough and tumble Hoosier North Athletic Conference. Will Hostrawser has a big, physical football team that will be in position to compete for a conference title this season and possibly make a postseason run in class 2A out of the North. South Bend St Joseph The St Joe program has been down for several years, while crosstown rival Mishawaka Marian has become a statewide power in class 3A. Former coach Ben Downey returns to the sidelines, and he will have the state's number two ranked player, Daeh McCullough, transferring in from Bloomington South to help him reestablish St Joe Indian football as a premier private school program in South Bend. Hanover Central HC is the fastest growing school in Northwest Indiana, and has one of the strongest overall athletic programs in the Region, if not the state. The Wildcats will be playing their final season in the Greater South Shore Conference before stepping up to the Northwest Crossroads in 2023. Coach Brian Parker has complete and total buy in to his football program and the Cats will be a contender in the postseason over the next several years Scottsburg After restarting the program in 2014, coach Kyle Mullins and his staff enjoyed their best season ever last year, and the Warriors look to continue to keep the momentum moving as the talent and skill level increases significantly and roster numbers improve at all levels of the program Bedford North Lawrence BNL has struggled to gain footing in the Hoosier Hills Conference and in class 5a. The Stars drop down to Class 4A this year which will give this program a needed shot in the arm and a boost in confidence as it looks ahead to the fall season. Derrick Barker is a solid young coach and he is getting more BNL athletes to come out and play football. Watch for the Stars to have some success in 4A. Owen Valley Robert Gibson turned around the Patriot program in his first season in 2021, winning 10 games for the first time since 1999 and establishing the program as a top challenger moving forward in the Western Indiana Conference. Gibson immediately implemented several program upgrades upon his arrival, and got complete and total buyin as the players embraced the new culture and leadership. Gibson will be at the top of any coaching search list in the state of Indiana given his early success North Judson Coach Brett Lambert has this program positioned for a deep run in the 1A postseason tournament, and the Blue Jays will also be in contention in the Hoosier North Athletic Conference. Lots of talent and speed up and down the roster and plenty of experienced returning help along the lines will position Judson for success in 2022 Hamilton Southeastern Westfield has risen to the top of the conference with two consecutive trips to the class 6A State finals, while Zionsville, Brownsburg, and Avon have all garnered more than their fair share of media attention over the past few seasons. Michael Kelly is building a rock solid program at HSE and the Royals will be deep, talented, and experienced, as they take a run at Westfield this year in the Hoosier Crossroads and position as a dark horse contender in 6A . West Lafayette Harrison Harrison, like HSE, has been overshadowed by its local rivals, but the time has come for the Raiders to step up and make a statement on the statewide stage. Harrison is the state's largest class 5A School in terms of enrollment, and Coach Terry Peebles has a big, bruising roster and a powerful offense that is designed to punish and wear down opposing defenses. Franklin Central The Flashes have struggled since arriving into the Hoosier Crossroads Conference 5 years ago, but that is about to change under the leadership of two-time state championship head coach Jason West. West, who won titles at Warren Central and Lawrence Central, has this program on the fast track and the Flashes will compete at a much higher level in 2022 and in short order will be contending for a conference championship. Lebanon Despite being the largest school in the Sagamore Conference, the Tigers have enjoyed little success given the outperformance of smaller rivals Danville, Tri-West, and Western Boone. Jeff Smock is a terrific young coach and has this program moving in the right direction. With significant improvements in size and speed, overall depth improvement, and a more experienced staff, look for the Tigers to start to leverage their size advantage over there smaller conference neighbors. Calumet Cody French has a solid program building at Calumet High School in Northwest Indiana, as the Warriors continue to improve their win total and look to advance in the postseason tournament. Calumet has invested heavily in equipment and facilities, as well as in its coaching staff over the past several years, and the Warriors are emerging as a top flight class 3A public school program in the far north. Crown Point The Crown Point School Administration made the state's biggest football coaching higher of the 2020 off season, bringing in Homewood Flossmoor ,Illinois head coach Craig Buzea, a Griffith graduate who led Portage to the state championship game in 1994. Buzea had a stellar 10-year run at HF, and expectations are that he will turn Crown Point into the north's top 6A threat to MIC dominance of the postseason tournament. Look for the Bulldogs to make significant strides in Buzea's second year, challenge for a Duneland championship, and have some success in the 6A postseason.
    2 points
  8. 2 points
  9. We completely hijacked HHF's thread on Rising Programs, lol. Meet me over at the Next Level if you want to continue your beat down. Maybe start a new thread titled Indianapolis vs Fort Wayne so we can discuss our "cute" little football programs in more detail. Maybe we can further look into why Fort Wayne sends more players to the NFL, per capita, than Indy does. Or maybe we can talk about the 7 on 7 team from Fort Wayne who won the IMG National Championship a few years back. Then we can move onto the SAC's 22 state titles by six different teams. Might even be fun to put together Indy's all time team and match it up with Fort Wayne's. Tough hill for FW to climb being 1/5 the size of Indy, might be fun trying though.
    2 points
  10. Sorry for barging into your hotel room, but I just thought I’d side with temp on this one…. ND and Mich are in pretty much the same boat…. and I think you meant bi-annually, not semi-annually.
    2 points
  11. The Evansville track scene is the deepest in a long time. Brodie and Thomas, as well as Eli McDurmon, are all medals contenders at the state finals and lead the way. But two other football guys like Dasmon Johnson (EM) and Drew Martin (MD) advanced to regional as well. Johnson was 7th in the 100 and Martin was 7th in the 200. So top 7 in the city was good enough for top 16 in the regional. That is amazing.
    2 points
  12. I wanna say Carroll (Fort Wayne). This opinion is pretty bold considering the Chargers haven't even made it past regionals in 12 years under Dinan. His record is 90-45, but many of those victories came against schools with much smaller enrollments. That being said, he's had a few teams that were pretty good. Last year was his best, but he unfortunately ran into Westfield's best. He tutored under Russ Isaacs for ten years, so he knows what it takes to build and maintain a program. And Carroll just continues to grow in student population. I wouldn't be surprised if they surpass the 3000 mark in five years. They have outstanding facilities. I think the Chargers could be a player at the 6A level for years to come. But they need to prove that last year's defense wasn't just a one year fluke.
    2 points
  13. WL yawns thru the vast majority of their regular season schedule. Nearly every conference game is over at halftime. Is that really good for the long term health of the program? With a stronger regular season slate, you might be looking at 2 or 3 more state titles during that 7 year span.
    2 points
  14. In 2019, Cass played them Twice in a three week spam. It was a meat grinder for Cass. They played Western, WL, HH, WL, and Pioneer in a 5 week run. Western has no business in the Hoosier if they ever want to be player in 4a.
    2 points
  15. Biden's Baby Formula Airlift Stunt Should Never Have Been Necessary https://reason.com/2022/05/19/bidens-baby-formula-airlift-stunt-should-never-have-been-necessary/ Agreed. Another failure of government regulation and "planning". The free and open market will always, always perform better.
    2 points
  16. Just a reminder, this is high school football. One community's kids lining up against another community's kids. There has NEVER been "competitive balance" and it is not (much to DT's chagrin, I'm sure) the IHSAA's goal to ensure "competitive balance." There will always be haves and have-nots, and sometimes, they cycle, even in football-crazed communities like Sheridan and New Palestine where there's the occasional down year ... and sometimes, long-moribund programs put together a great year ... and most will be in the middle. But there's really no such thing as competitive balance in high school sports. Coaching turnover has been an issue since the leather helmet days. We read more about it now because we have access to statewide info, but we've always seen a lot of coaching turnover - either from coaches going to bigger programs or getting the boot for not winning enough. Now, we're seeing coaches leave head coaching jobs for assistant jobs and/or leaving the profession entirely. A decade ago, it was in part because teaching jobs were hard to find and we had a lot of lay coaches or coaches who taught in a different building than where they coached. Now, that's not as big of an issue, but there's always a lot of churn.
    2 points
  17. Saw that movie the night before my first — and only — marathon. I know that’s a bit trite, but I was pretty desperate at that point.
    2 points
  18. I had no idea until I heard about this as well. Really incredible story. Also read ND has not offered Daeh and isn't likely to end up playing college ball in South Bend. I thought for sure he would be heading to ND with his dad but sounds like that may not be the case which makes me wonder why he de-committed from IU? Good question, was wondering the same thing.
    2 points
  19. And I agree with you on that. Trust me we don't just stay in our base T all the time, we run twins, pro, over, unbalanced etc... But for us it is about basing our culture and doing what works for us. We've had years in the past when success wasn't met. My point is it's not always the offense you are running but more of the belief that you put into it. You can be the smartest spread guy in the world and still go 0-10. We still after all the success. How can we improve. Our goal is to continue to win, so what can we do day to day to get better? It's more about those things. Putting kids in places to be successful and making sure they believe that they can be successful.
    2 points
  20. https://www.jconline.com/story/sports/college/purdue/football/2022/05/18/purdue-athletics-begin-paying-bonuses-academic-achievement-fall-us-supreme-court-v-alston-case/9818706002/ Hmm, so I assume students attending Purdue on a academic scholarship, who probably spend as much extra time on achieving academic excellence as scholarship athletes spend on achieving athletic excellence, can also receive a similar bonus?
    2 points
  21. 2 points
  22. From what I understand, they ran a version of the Full T? (Double TEs, 3 Backs) You only have to look a little bit to the north to find some schools that are really, really good in it. Zeeland West's HC Jon Schilito has won 4 state titles and 300+ games in it. Hudsonville Unity Christian just set the state scoring record with it (803 in a 14 game schedule). 1 formation, ball in the air 4-6 times a game. It doesn't look like what people watch on Saturdays and Sundays and so they don't like. Pioneer runs the Delaware Wing-T, and you see some other Indiana Teams dabble with Wing T concepts. Plymouth ran some T in the last 00s, last I've seen Full House T in Indiana was Dave Sharpe at Laporte. Is he running it at Noblesville? Michigan has more T and Wing-T.....Indiana seems to have more Option. It's been interesting to compare HS football in the 2 states during my time in each.
    2 points
  23. While you never say never, there is a long tradition in the NCC, and football is not a real priority there. Basketball rules the roost in that league and always will. There may be a day when some of the eastern NCC schools - especially Richmond and maybe Muncie Central or Anderson - break away and form a new league, but I'm not sure Western and West Lafayette want to get into a league with big 5A and 6A schools.
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Cody is 23. And just know seeing all this
    1 point
  27. Not sure if anyone is familiar with Coach McCullough's background, but it is a remarkable story. I actually had a chance to meet him as he came to the school to meet our RB at that time. It was a great chat, but before I knew this story. https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/29324031/kc-chiefs-rb-coach-deland-mccullough-jaw-dropping-story-search-family
    1 point
  28. I agree with this 100%. If your teams at Taboro had a ton of talent and you weren't winning state championships (or sectional for that matter), you might have some thoughts about what you can do differently, though. "We've always done things this way" is fine if you're still churning out championships. Trust me, I'm not pounding the table for every program to move to the spread. I'm a fan of Adams Central and we run the ball 90% of the time out of the wing-t. We've also gone to semistate 4 out of the last 6 seasons and made a trip to LOS in 21. If we went 10 years without a sectional championship and we were averaging 11 pts/game in post season losses, I hope the staff would consider changes that can be made to get over the hump. What works for one program won't necessarily work for another. Staffs of talented rosters need to maximize their potential. Running the same system for 20 years is fantastic as long as it produces postseason championships, assuming that's how you define success. I think Leo is at the point where regular season success and NE8 championships just aren't enough to deem a season a success.
    1 point
  29. https://www.indystar.com/story/news/education/2022/05/18/purdue-back-a-boiler-loan-program-students-income-contract/9590978002/ Note: Story is behind a paywall. Caveat Emptor rears it's ugly head again.
    1 point
  30. I have no "inside" source, but I'm told by multiple people they expect this next year to be "quiet" publicly and then in 23-24 an announcement for some significant changes to the Indy Metro conference landscape. Most of those people have different opinions on what that will be. Personally, I would like to see HCC remain relatively unchanged but see Carmel/CG basically rotate around the HCC football world as semi-permanent non-conf games...that's a voting bloc of one, and I don't actually get a vote. My gut tells me there will be more domino's to drop and chairs to shuffle.
    1 point
  31. Could kind of see this one coming.....leaves both of his brothers at IU. Unless they soon both move north to join him. Question....at most schools, does a child of a parent working at a school get free schooling without taking up a scholly? In other words, if Daeh ends up playing at ND, does he take up one of the alotted scholarships or would he get free schooling through his father as an employee?
    1 point
  32. Update on our 7vs7 tournament. We have one spot open in each division so let me know if you want in. I also attached the location, rules, scoring system, and other info. Big State: Small State: Mooresville 1 1 Mooresville 2 Tri West 1 2 South Newton 1 Perry Meridian 1 3 Perry Meridian 2 Heritage Christian 1 4 Heritage Christian 2 Southport 1 5 Southport 2 South Dearborn 1 6 South Dearborn 2 Northview 1 7 Northview 2 Decatur Central 1 8 Decatur Central 2 Riverton Parke 1 9 Riverton Parke 2 Indian Creek 1 10 Indian Creek 2 Gibson Southern 1 11 Gibson Southern 2 Monrovia 1 12 Cascade 1 Lutheran 1 13 Monrovia 2 Speedway 1 14 Brown County 1 Lawrence North 1 15 Lutheran 2 Hamilton Heights 1 16 Triton 1 IPS George Washington 1 17 Lawrence North 2 Indiana Deaf 1 18 Lawrence North 3 Yorktown 1 19 Hamilton Heights 2 20 7 on 7 Rules.docx
    1 point
  33. If it hasn't been made clear already, Northridge without a doubt is the school that will continue to push Warsaw athletically across all sports. For at least a decade or more now, the Raiders and Tigers have been the two schools battling it out for the All-Conference trophy, and there is no reason to think it won't continue to be those two schools moving forward. Two pieces of amazing news for the Northridge and Middlebury community! Outstanding!
    1 point
  34. Nina Jankowicz's Faulty Record, Not Her Critics, Doomed the Disinformation Board https://reason.com/2022/05/18/disinformation-board-nina-jankowicz-taylor-lorenz-pause-dhs/ More: Even more: Yet more still: That's the explicit message of the article, and it's hammered home over and over again: expressing concerns about Jankowicz and the Disinformation Governance Board is an act of sabotage by bad-faith right-wing harassers against a noble public servant. The Washington Post does not grapple with legitimate criticisms of Jankowicz. The article doesn't even acknowledge that any exist. Bad people oppose Jankowicz, in the Post's framing, and if you oppose Jankowicz, you're probably one of them. Yet there is good reason to be skeptical of both the Disinformation Governance Board and Jankowicz's fitness to run it. Informal efforts to police disinformation on social media are beset with serious challenges, as moderators and fact-checkers routinely make odious mistakes: Just today, Facebook dubiously censored a recipe for homemade baby formula. The social media site's fact-checkers have previously flagged Reason articles as spreading false information, only to later admit the articles in question were accurate. John Stossel, host of Stossel TV and a contributor to Reason, is currently suing Facebook for characterizing his videos as misleading, even though fact-checkers eventually conceded he was right. Government disinformation cops are no better; time and time again, public health officials circulated false information about COVID-19, and suppressed perfectly legitimate discussion of the theory that the virus originated from a lab leak. And when The New York Post reported on the salacious contents of Hunter Biden's laptop just weeks before the election, the story was widely dismissed by so-called disinformation experts and government security experts on grounds that they presumed it to be Russian malfeasance. "Hunter Biden Story Is Russian Disinfo, Dozens of Former Intel Officials Say," reported Politico back in October 2020. Jankowicz repeatedly made public statements indicating that she held this view, too. She shared national security officials' "high confidence" that the Hunter Biden story was part of a Russian influence campaign. She described the idea that the laptop had been left behind at a repair shop as "a fairy tale." This was a critical test of whether disinformation experts could check their innate tendency to ascribe everything unfavorable to the Democratic Party as Russian nefariousness, and they utterly failed. Jankowicz failed as well. Somewhere in Lorenz's article, amid the repetitive praising of Jankowicz's qualifications, anonymously sourced lamentations that DHS will no longer be able to recruit effectively, and broad characterization of criticism as nothing more than sexist harassment, perhaps that failure deserved a mention. The article reads like it was ghostwritten by Jankowicz herself, which makes the underlying scoop less impressive: It's easy to get a government official to cooperate for a news article when the news article takes the form of PR.
    1 point
  35. https://mises.org/wire/medical-revolt-coming This, of course is what the cartel has worked so hard to change. Without question, hospitals and their industry pals have bribed legislators and bureaucrats to avoid the same competitive market discipline that made the economic miracle of this country the envy of the world. For this reason, we must always focus on the consumer's interests and completely discount any poor-mouthing claims of the sellers, claims which give cover to the dysfunctional arrangement we now endure. Let's go back even further, to the nineteenth century, when French economic Frédéric Bastiat penned his famous satirical essay "The Candlemakers' Petition" in 1845. Here's what he had to say about giving the seller the advantage over the buyer: Mises and Bastiat knew full well what would happen if the buyer was placed at a disadvantage, whatever excuse the sellers or producers used. Before I continue, we should distinguish between mutually beneficial exchange and a zero-sum, or leveraged, exchange. Always remember that the buyer and seller never voluntarily come together to exchange unless it is to the advantage of both. The seller of the milk values three dollars more than his milk, and the buyer values the milk more than his three dollars. Both parties emerge from the transaction improved from their prior position. A zero-sum exchange, in contrast, is where one party wins at the other's expense. In this type of exchange, the buyer or the seller is victimized by the other party. This is the business model of government, and this is the business model of the medical cronies government enables. Think predator and prey. Think of yourself as clean sheets and the cronies as Amber Heard. While there are two methods of exchange, there are two types of buyers: legitimate and illegitimate. A legitimate buyer respects mutually beneficial exchange and is represented by individual patients and any others who work as a good-faith proxy on an individual's behalf, whether a self-funded plan or a cost-sharing ministry. Government and traditional insurance companies are illegitimate, zero-sum buyers, whose hit-and-run model is based on leveraged exchange and whose interests are diametrically opposed to the interests of patients. Patient and consumer misery are consistent with their goals. Government buyers in countries with universal care plans take this to the extreme with coerced euthanasia plans, as a citizen death helps their balance sheet. Doctors in Great Britain are actually paid a bounty for any sick or elderly patients they can lead to the euthanasia slaughterhouse. There are also two types of sellers: those who seek to maximize revenue and those who seek to maximize delivery of value. The resulting combinations of these buyer and seller types can result in one or even both parties, buyer and seller, acting in bad faith. Think pure bad faith when a hospital owns an insurance company. Think pure bad faith with an accountable care organization model, where a hospital basically owns an HMO. The patient is completely disenfranchised, vulnerable, without an advocate, as both the buyer and the seller are illegitimate. Things are a little better for the patient when only one of the parties to the exchange is illegitimate—say, when a legitimate cost-sharing ministry or self-funded employer buys from a price-gouging hospital. The patient experience is maximized when both parties are legitimate and seek mutual benefit. In this instance of symbiotic legitimacy, the provision of a substandard service invites the merciless market forces that will put one out of business. The quality question is therefore solved when both buyer and seller are legitimate. Quality is "baked in," as FMMA cofounder Jay Kempton says. When government places consumers at a disadvantage, prices soar and quality plummets. This is clear in any market where hospital consolidation has taken place. It became crystal clear when the number of insurance companies was intentionally downsized by the Unaffordable Care Act's medical loss ratio. The before- and after-Obamacare stock price of UnitedHealthcare makes the point that when consumer choice is limited, prices soar. When government places sellers like hospitals or physicians at a disadvantage, with price controls or a heavy regulatory burden, shortages materialize and quality plummets. Burdensome regulations are crafted by industry participants large enough to survive—and as smaller sellers surrender, the ensuing consolidation that leads to higher prices results. The result of all this: government can more easily sell disadvantaged consumers than disadvantaged sellers, because the sellers are more willing to spend big money for advantages that can make them rich. The one thing the cronies fear is an equal playing field, the real competition of the free market. This is the core goal of the crony cartel, escaping real competition and ensuring that the seller always has the advantage. Don't be fooled when a big insurance company and a big hospital system provide a theatrical display where one agrees to play the victim to the other, hoping people will pick sides. This is an important part of ensuring the scam stays alive, as this theatrical distraction provides an important decoy for the real play, one where the hospital and the carrier work side by side. It hasn't always been this way. I was fortunate during my premed years to shadow two great and extremely busy surgeons, Dr. Don Garrett and Dr. Richard Allgood. There were two hospitals in town, neither one of which could survive without these two. Drs. Garrett and Allgood never hesitated to move patients from one hospital to the other if one hospital failed to provide what the patients needed. These hospitals had to compete with each other for their referrals, and failure to do so meant disaster for them. The hospitals were accountable to all the referring physicians, essentially the proxy buyers for their patients. I should point out that the better the physician's reputation, the busier they were, and therefore the hospital that couldn't cater to the great doctors was punished even more severely, a quality control measure largely absent today. This was the case all over the country. As late as 1990, when I started my practice in Oklahoma City, physicians and surgeons, some of whom—like Norman Imes, who is in this room—moved their patients or threatened to move their patients to other facilities if the hospital didn't provide what their patients needed. In Oklahoma City, Deaconess Hospital, right across the street from the huge Baptist Hospital, provided a quality check and ensured that both hospitals had to provide a quality experience for the patients and for the referring physicians. It was not uncommon for a physician to move all of his patients from one hospital to another until conditions improved. The Surgery Center of Oklahoma was successful early on due to the failure of area hospitals to provide orthopedic surgeons what they needed to care for their patients. The role of the federal government in this power shift, away from patient and physician choice, is painfully clear and, once again, the obvious result of the auctioning of our consumer choices to the medical sellers. Medical sellers have been purchasing the choices of consumers and patients for a long time, and they are good at it. In Nashville a few weeks ago, a Washington insider told me the following story about the passage of Obamacare. Industry representatives and lobbyists had locked arms in opposition to Obamacare, assuming they would almost certainly be victimized by it. One by one, opponents were picked off. Those remaining and opposed wondered what was going on. The administration simply followed the money. Where were the biggest lobbies? The American Hospital Association, initially opposed to Obamacare, was told that their biggest fear, it seemed, was competition, primarily from physician-owned facilities. Therefore, if the AHA would support this law, Barry Soetoro (Obama's real name), would see to it that new physician-owned facilities were banned and those in existence would be prohibited from expanding. The hospitals abandoned the opposition. The insurance carriers, initially opposed, were promised a medical loss ratio, which would put all but four or five of them out of business. They, too, left the opposition. Last but not least, Big Pharma was told that it seemed their future profitability would come from biologic drugs, as the growth in generic drugs would eat into their margins. They were promised a twenty-year ban on competition from biologics produced in foreign countries. They, too, left the opposition, and the next week, the FDA [Food and Drug Administration] declared foreign biologics unsafe. As outrageous as this is, it is a broken record. Government intervenes on behalf of the few who can afford to buy their intervention, and the vast majority, the rest of us, pay the price. One incredibly disruptive intervention was when the federal government through its bankrupt arm Medicare decided to pay double for physician services delivered by hospital-employed physicians. It should come as no surprise that the percentage of independently practicing physicians has been on the decline ever since. This cynical move was meant to protect hospitals from the competition and demands for quality that physicians like Drs. Garrett, Allgood, Imes, and many others had made. Currently, hospitals are no longer accountable to their medical staff, having purchased a large part of their staff, essentially making geldings of them all. Patients are now largely denied the advocacy they had in the past, when independent physicians went to bat for them, voting with their feet. If a hospital was no good, physicians walked away. Now, if a hospital is no good, the hospital continues to see the flow of referrals from their kept referral sources, who are financially penalized for doing anything else. "Whose bread I eat, his song I must sing." When someone asks me how I know free market facilities and physicians can provide quality, I tell them that referrals in a free market are not guaranteed, buyers can walk away. I would argue that the quality of care delivered by a medical facility is directly related to the extent to which that facility is accountable to its medical staff. "What percentage of your medical staff is employed?" should be a question those attempting to measure quality should ask. To be clear, hospitals with an employed staff do not have to be any good to retain business, a result of the corporate rather than physician control of patient care. Clearly, the root cause has been a shift in the balance of power, where the medical seller, the hospital, has gained the upper hand over the patient and their advocate. This shift in power to the seller, in most cases the hospital, has become the new normal, and so ingrained in the industry that those who provide more efficient, cheaper, and better services are paradoxically criticized rather than applauded, as these fragile hospital systems might not survive a challenge to the fortress they've built. Not only has the balance of power been shifted, but any challenge to this balance also meets a swift and brutal response, usually on "fairness" and "social" grounds. When the late Tom Coburn, one of the Surgery Center of Oklahoma's greatest defenders, was told by a hospital executive that it wasn't fair to compare his hospital to the Surgery Center of Oklahoma, Coburn said, "You are right. They pay tax." Tax advantages are one thing. Certificates of need, blacklisting by insurance carriers, banning of physician-owned facilities by the Unaffordable Care Act: these are just a few examples of power granted to the sellers by the legislative concubines, always at the expense of the buyer. This power shift has been with us so long that even those who claim to be free marketeers can get sucked in. Here is a comment at the website mises.org in response to a very positive article about a patient experience at the Surgery Center of Oklahoma. This comment is a tribute to the success of the hospital poor-mouthing propaganda campaign: Ah. The poor hospital, suffering with so much uncertainty. The author of this comment is not unique, having succumbed to the supposed plight of the seller, discounting the buyer's role. "In what other industry are the problems of the seller the buyer's problem?" asks Jay Kempton. How is it that craftsmen and others in the market provide quotes with the uncertainty they face? Many years ago, I solicited a bid from a carpenter to build a deck in my backyard. He made some measurements, asked what type of wood I had in mind, and gave me a bid. He encountered some difficulty setting his posts due to a rock formation not far under the surface, but this wasn't his first rodeo, and he had made an allowance for this. Difficulties that he had encountered in the past were baked into his margin. If these difficulties didn't materialize, he was more profitable. If they did, he had made an allowance. A margin based on the idea of a bell curve is not that difficult and is exactly how our prices are constructed at the Surgery Center of Oklahoma. Why are hospitals exempt from this discipline? Why is the uncertainty every other industry must endure intolerable in the medical industry? Or to the point of our message today, why are the difficulties of the seller of any interest whatsoever to the buyer or the public at large? How can this ever change? This will change when the medical buyer, like every other consumer, lays true claim to his proper place and votes with his feet when treated with contempt. Hospital executives don't worry about buyers with choices. They cannot fathom the idea that there is any such thing as a choice in an industry devoted to limiting choice. With their heads in the sand, drunk with arrogance, the time is now for buyers, particularly the self-funded buyers, to act. They can begin by understanding and embracing their rightful place and therefore the power they wield and then acting with confidence. As Matt Ohrt has said, "Quit feeding the beast," and demand that sellers accommodate your preferences. As the awareness of our free market movement spreads, the shift in power to the consumer is inevitable, a shift that is already increasingly visible. The eternal challenge of government has been the subjugation of the many by the few, for if the few awaken to government's countless scams, the mass of people will become unmanageable and ungovernable. They will revolt. The challenge of the medical industry complex has also been the subjugation of the many by the few. The healthcare system in this country is not a disaster for everyone, after all. It is an orgy of robbery of the many by the few. Governments and this medical cartel use the same methods to maintain control, using fear, primarily. Fear, along with the purposeful placement of the seller at an advantage, and therefore placing the consumer and patient at a disadvantage, has kept the masses from rising up. Until now. The revolution has begun, and the traditional mold is crumbling. The alternative healthcare nation is within view. The time for the confident medical consumer has arrived, and the time has also arrived for price gougers and the rest of the bandits to fear a discriminating buyer and in enterprise recognize the customer as captain, as Mises did. Agreed. We need a medical revolution in the country, one where the consumer is the captain of the ship.
    1 point
  36. One wedge issue after another coming into the mid-terms........ Race, Abortion, Climate..... BLM founder blames her admitted "mistakes" on "White guilt money"...... https://nypost.com/2022/05/18/blm-co-founder-patrisse-cullors-says-white-guilt-money-mistakes-weaponized-against-her/
    1 point
  37. While not specifically football news, some exciting additions/ news coming out of Middlebury this past week with the hiring of a strength and conditioning specialist and the announcement of a new gym/ athletic center.
    1 point
  38. I haven't seen/heard the complaints about Leo's offense under Sauder, but I do understand the frustration with the lack postseason success. I'm assuming that Coach Sauder and his staff would trade most, if not all, of their conference championships for sectional & regional championships. I'm not saying that had they run a more modern offense they would've had more postseason success, but I do understand how people can draw that conclusion. Since Coach Sauder has taken over, Leo has averaged 11.6 points per game in their postseason losses. Many of those teams had expectations to make it out of sectional and only 2 of them did (0 since 2011). Most of those losses boasted some solid defensive performances as well. Like it or not, the game is changing and more importantly, the strengths and abilities of opponents are changing. There are more teams now, especially in the upper classes, that are equipped with size, strength and speed (opposed to simply being a bruising team or a speed team). Teams can definitely have postseason success running more "traditional" offensive systems, but the results of the Leo's last 10 postseasons are suggesting that what they're doing isn't enough. If anyone says that Leo's offensive system worked, that's fine. It won a ton of regular season games. But if you say that, you're also saying that Leo maximized their postseason potential the last 10 years and I'm not sure that's the case. I do think Coach Sauder was a fantastic coach and his win totals reflect that. I just think that Leo may have left some meat on the bone the last 10 years and their offensive system may have been a part of that.
    1 point
  39. Another interesting school for the near future is Whiteland. Growing incredibly quickly and could possibly get to the size of a Center Grove within 5-6 years (only about a 10 minute drive between Whiteland and CG). You have to think that it would outgrow the Mid-State conference. Not sure how that plays out, but do keep in mind CG will either try to get back in the HCC or create a new conference. From very good sources, I believe a new conference will be formed within 5 years and CG will be at the helm of it. Maybe Whiteland will try and continue that growth and look for something larger.
    1 point
  40. My kids go to Northrop. School spirit=low. School culture=low. School identity=low. New principal=often. Once, my daughter called to tell me that there was no teacher in the room. I quickly called the office and they said that there was a teacher in the room. I told her I would patch in my daughter three-way calling if she'd like to talk to my daughter and the invisible teacher in the room at the same time. Oh, the stories I hear and the amazing videos I see every day. A long time ago, I was an instructional coach with Leo on my coaching list...not really there much, but it was wonderful when I was there.
    1 point
  41. 6A: Carmel is always in the mix, Cathedral is always loaded but last year would've been their year to compete in 6A. Don't count out the MIC powers. It's going to be a toss-up as always. 5A: Maybe the most wide-open division. Decatur Central has a lot of talent and its recent roadblocks Cathedral & New Pal are now out of the way. This might be the year a Region team gets it done. 4A: Roncalli & Mt. Vernon both suffered heavy graduation losses. New Pal returns nearly everybody from a 5A sectional champion, including at least four players with D1 offers and an RB with two 1,000-yard seasons. I don't think they'll fly under the radar long. Brebeuf is good - even without Strickland, their front 6 on defense is excellent and they're well-coached. I'd move New Pal & Brebeuf into the "can win it all" category. I don't know what Memorial has coming back, but they've been to back-to-back semistates. They may be the favorite.
    1 point
  42. PPV level entertainment here. Love it.
    1 point
  43. People seem to forget the real reason Carmel and CG decided to look at HCC. I agree with you. Also, I find it funny that there are still a handful of the remaining MIC schools who have reached out to Carmel and CG about keeping them on the schedule. Kind of funny to me...
    1 point
  44. You need to get in your Prius with Bernie stickers and drive through the Webos area and find the sprawl. I swear to God you do
    1 point
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